Mattress recycling springs into action with diversion drive

Plans to divert over one million mattresses from landfill by 2012 are underway with the opening of a new recycling facility in Telford.

No rest till recovery: John Neill with a pile of used mattresses

No rest till recovery: John Neill with a pile of used mattresses

The factory is the first of ten plants Shropshire-based JBS Fibre Recovery intends to build across the UK by the end of the year as it looks to capitalise upon this niche market.

JBS has already recycled 180,000 used mattresses over the past 12 months and has now invested more than £500,000 in its first dedicated centre at Stafford Park.

According to the National Bed Federation, around two million mattresses are manufactured in the UK every year, but remain tricky to dispose of with many recycling centres unable to process the diverse range of materials.

The JBS facility, which has the capacity to recycle over 150,000 mattresses a year, splits the item down into five separate components - fabric, polyurethane foam, metal springs, flock, and the base.

The first four components are fully recyclable, leaving the base to be processed through anaerobic digestion.

JBS Fibre Recovery director, John Neill, said: "This new facility gives us the additional capacity to work alongside stakeholders including Wolverhampton City Council, Telford and Wrekin Council, major retailers such as John Lewis, bed manufacturing companies, and the general public."

He added: "We also believe the new centre will contribute to a decline in anti-social behaviour such as the fly-tipping of unwanted mattresses."

Maxine Perella


anaerobic digestion


Waste & resource management
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