SC Johnson boosts wind deployment to close gap on renewables target

SC Johnson increased its use of renewable energy to 29.9% in 2011 pushing the business closer to its 2016 target of 33%, according to its latest sustainability report.

SC Johnson's wind turbines at the Waxdale facility

SC Johnson's wind turbines at the Waxdale facility

The company set new sustainability objectives last year, after completing its 2006-2010 corporate energy and emissions goals.

Within its 2016 targets, SC Johnson will aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from global manufacturing sites by 48% from a 2000 baseline. The report shows that in 2011 the company reduced GHG emissions by 42% from a 2000 baseline.

The company increased its renewable energy consumption last year with new wind turbines at its Waxdale manufacturing facility,  located in Mt. Pleasant, Wisconsin in the US, which became operational in December 2012.

SC Johnson's two 415ft wind turbines will be able to generate about 15% of electrical energy onsite and 8,000,000KWh of electricity per year.

With the addition of the two turbines, the site will be able to generate, on average, 100% of electrical energy onsite. The remainder of Waxdale's electrical energy is provided by two cogeneration units installed during the last decade, which produce electrical energy and steam.

Approximately 45% will be renewable energy from landfill gases used by one cogeneration unit, and 40% will be clean energy from natural gas used by the second cogeneration unit. Together, the turbines and cogeneration systems enable Waxdale to reduce carbon emissions associated with powering the facility by 6,000 metric tons annually.

Read here on SC Johnson's consumer engagment drive from the company's sustainbility manager Will Archer

Leigh Stringer


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