School grows its own to teach sustainability

An east London school for young people with special needs has just harvested its first crop of vegetables.

Pupils at the William Morris school in Waltham Forest, which helps youngsters aged 11 to 19, are celebrating a bumper crop of corns, beetroots, onions and much more.

Built less than a year ago the vegetable garden is teaching pupils about where food comes from as they eat much of what they grow.

The plot also has the potential to offer the pupils a career once their education is over.

The school's head teacher, Ian Johnston, and the head of technology, Dennis Penessa, explain in this video about the project.

Mr Johnston said he hoped the garden would not only teach his pupils about the food chain, but also give them the possibility of a future career.

He said: "With 2012 in the offing and the increase in the number of parks in the area and with Waltham Forest being a host borough we felt there may be sustainable employment opportunities there.

"And we can give our kids a little start in that direction."

Luke Walsh




Energy efficiency & low-carbon
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