Doing it in the cold


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28/09/2012 10:5

What will be discussed As our global climate warms up, the climate for action has been getting colder. For many of us, climate change has been forced way down the agenda. Regulatory uncertainty and risk, especially over Feed In Tariff, and meagre returns has caused a flight of capital. This session will discuss ways of doing and funding low carbon heat and power, in a cold financial climate. We will look at: -Benefits of renewable heat, mainly communal heating with heat pumps and biomass boilers, with case studies -Barriers and pitfalls and how to address these -Funding structures to give the property owner optimal benefits given their varying resources and ability or willingness to take on risk -Best use of RHI, CESP and CERT -Solar PV - life after 2011 FIT Review: structuring solar PV programmes with meagre Feed In Tariff levels: Who Should Attend Local Authorities and Housing Associations Private Landlords Anyone with an interest in low carbon residential heat and power. What delegates will learn Delegates will learn from the experience of iPower and its delivery partners: - about a distinctive approach to delivering low carbon heat and power -what benefits have been achieved from renewable heat installations, and barriers and risks involved -how a response can be made to the solar PV opportunity, despite low FIT levels -about options for structuring and financing low carbon energy to suit differing levels of resource and ability to take on risk.

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