Energy Mapping - Maximizing Environmental & Revenue Opportunities using Geographic Analysis


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28/09/2012 10:5

The Climate Change Act commits the UK Government to reduce carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. Incentives to help reach this target include Feed-in Tariffs, the Renewable Heat Incentive, Green Deal and CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme. These create opportunities to make savings through greater energy efficiency and generate income streams through the use of zero and low carbon technologies such as solar and CHP. To maximize energy savings and income generation, a robust evidence base is needed to plan strategic options and to communicate potential to stakeholders. Geographic analysis and visualisation can play a pivotal role in creating this and disseminating it to different audiences. This presentation will show how the strategic planning of energy use and generation is inherently spatial in nature and cannot be done without the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics covered will include: - Creating a property level evidence base to support decisions making - Delivering the evidence base to stakeholders - Promoting opportunities to customers/citizens Delegates will learn how tools inherent within GIS can be used with methodologies and approaches from experts in low carbon and energy efficiency to derive the information required to make evidence based decisions which justify expenditure and maximize the return in terms of revenue and carbon reduction. Examples will be drawn on work undertaken by industry experts, Esri UK and Local Authorities including Nottingham City Council. This presentation should be attended by those with an interest in the strategic planning and mapping of energy demand and future generation.

Video: Energy Mapping - Maximizing Environmental & Revenue Opportunities using Geographic Analysis
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