How to save the UK's water


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11/01/2013 13:0

Video: How to save the UK's water
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Jetchem Systems Limited and Superjet

The Jetchem Group is widely regarded as the leading manufacturer of High and Ultra High Pressure Water Jetting equipment and accessories in the UK. With depots placed throughout the country working alongside our fleet of service vehicles and personnel, we aim to bring you not only great products at great prices but also a five star level of service and care.

Medium voltage drives improve life cycle costs at Pumping Station

The first UK installation of a new type of medium voltage AC drive has been commissioned at Yorkshire Water's Blackburn Meadows Wastewater Treatment Works in Sheffield. Six ACS 2000 drives from ABB have replaced a DC drive system used to control a set of pumps. The multi-pump arrangement is used to transfer wastewater 25 metres below ground to the head of the treatment works. Medium voltage drives were selected instead of low voltage drives due to the long cable lengths and overall project costs including the electrical distribution system, variable-speed drives and motors.

WWT Round Table - Fats, Oils and Grease

Wastewater industry leaders gathered at the latest WWT Industry Forum in central London recently to debate the increasing problems presented by fats, oils and grease (FOG). Chaired by Steve Ntifo, environment and science adviser at Water UK, participants at the 'round table' event included influential representatives from organisations such as the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, United Utilities, Thames Water, South West Water and Severn Trent Water, as well as leading figures from event sponsors Anglian Water and Environmental Biotech UK.

WWT Round Table - Water Regulation

Senior representatives from Government, water companies, and water industry regulators met on 28 October to discuss the current regulatory regime's capacity to meet future challenges.Against the backdrop of the Cave and Walker reviews, the coalition Government is currently involved in a number of initiatives to assess changes to the sector's regulatory framework.The Round Table, which was held at the Institute of Directors in London, brought together representatives from all of these constituencies to discuss their aspirations, and outline their predictions, for the future shape of water industry regulation in the UK.The participants included Ofwat chief executive, Regina Finn; Ian Barker, the Environment Agency's head of water; Anne McIntosh MP, chair of the All Party Parliamentary Water Group and senior representatives from Severn Trent Water, Anglian Water, Thames Water and Scottish Water.Chairing the debate was Bob Baty, former executive director, South West Water. The proposition under discussion was: How does regulation of the UK water industry need to change in the new economic and environmental climate?Most participants agreed that climatic, economic and social changes mean the current regulatory system may no longer be able to ensure the levels of performance the industry has achieved since privatisation in 1989.Other key points included:- The role of competition in meeting the new challenges- The need to raise customer awareness about the economic, social and environmental value of water- A call for clarity on legislators' long-term goals for the water sectorThe Round Table was organised by WWT magazine in partnership with Black & Veatch

Energy Aid

Energy Aid launched to boost developing world power access A new charity has been set up with the aim of getting the estimated 1bn people who live without electricity on the grid. Related articles CCS has 'no friends' but must get Britain's backing Dirty biomass could lead to 'carbon fraud' claim green campaigners Drax turbine upgrade will deliver 40% efficiency gain CCS is 'unattractive but vital' to meeting carbon targets Biomass cleaner than coal and could benefit forests Energy Aid, which will be globally launched next week, was showcased last night (December 1) at the London offices of backers IBM. The idea behind the charity is to help the people the UN thinks have no power and the 2.7bn it estimates have to cook with biomass, wood, dung, coal and other solid fuels every year. The charity aims to emulate the success of Water Aid, but will operate through partner organisations on the ground rather than going in themselves. Energy Aid chief executive, Jonathon Steel, told edie energy: "We don't have plans to build infrastructure ourselves. "Water Aid has done a lot of good work on the ground, but it's taken them two decades in some cases to get there. "Our objective is to identify partners, and we're not going to be religious about who we partner with, and find the best solutions for the people." Mr Steel also rejected the idea increasing access to energy in the third world could be detrimental to efforts to cut global emissions, saying adding all the people without power to the gird would increase world-wide emissions by just 0.7%. He added: "Energy can be a route out of poverty for the people who have no access to electricity. "As a result the charity will identify and address issues preventing large portions of the population from using electricity safely such as helping the people who cook using solid fuels to avoid indoor smoke from cooking stoves. "Deaths from this surpasses the death toll caused by Malaria, indoor smoke kills 1.4 million people each year, most of which are women and children." IBM UK and Ireland chief executive and chair of Energy Aid's trustees, Stephen Leonard, said: "Just over a year ago at the IBM Sustainability Summit at Start held in London, one particular idea emerged that has since caught many people's imagination - the idea of Energy Aid. "Providing universal energy access is one of the most important challenges of our time but no one organisation can do this alone and collaborative approaches are now needed." Practical Action chief executive and founding Trustee, Simon Trace, "The creation of Energy Aid was inspired by the work of Practical Action, we have been working for over 40 years with communities providing them with the tools and opportunity they need to lift themselves out of poverty. "Practical Action is an expert in energy solutions for the developing world and we are proud to be involved in this exciting initiative."

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