Geothermal energy

DEFINITION: Heat energy generated and stored in the earth. Geothermal energy is accessed by drilling water or steam wells in a process similar to drilling for oil. That steam is then converted into power much the same way as a traditional power stations, using turbines, generators and transformers.

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The RHI consultation had attracted criticism for proposing to slash tariffs for biomass heat by 45%, which was projected by the Government to lead to a 98% drop in installations

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