Hazardous waste

DEFINITION: Waste is considered hazardous if it is harmful to humans or the environment. Examples include: batteries, mineral oils, chemicals etc. Hazardous waste must be dealt with separately
to non-hazardous waste and consignment notes should be exchanged for each transfer.

See also: Energy-from-waste (EfW)

See also: Residual waste

See also: Zero waste

See also: Waste Framework Directive

See also: Waste stream

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