Traceability

DEFINITION: A concept that ensures the reliability and visibility of sustainability claims associated with products along the supply chain. Traceability ensures good practice in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment and anti-corruption.

See also: Supply chain

See also: Sustainable procurement

See also: Producer responsibility

Related items

The supply chain can account for more than 90% of a company's environmental footprint

Scope 3 and the supply chain: How businesses are taking sustainability leadership to a new frontier

Not too long ago, sustainable leadership was defined by those 'getting their own house in order' through emissions reductions, but as the pace required to reduce emissions grows, so too does the efforts from businesses to assist the supply chain in decarbonising. Here, edie looks at some of the transformational ways businesses are engaging with suppliers.

Deforestation will be mitigated through supply chain engagement, recycled material sourcing and investment in innovation

World Rainforest Day: Dozens of retailers commit to deforestation-free fashion supply chains

Ralph Lauren, Ted Baker, Sainsbury's and Asda are among a coalition of 45 major businesses jointly pledging to eliminate deforestation from their fashion supply chains, as part of a collaborative initiative coordinated by non-profit Canopy.

The new commitments will also focus on supply chain emissions and regenerative practices 

Unilever launches €1bn climate and nature fund, targets net-zero emissions by 2039

Consumer goods giant Unilever has unveiled a new set of sustainability commitments, pledging to end its contribution to deforestation, promote regenerative agriculture, transition to biodegradable ingredients and reach net-zero emissions for products by 2039 - all supported by a new €1bn Climate and Nature fund.

No company assessed could prove that workers across the supply chain had the right to unionise

World's largest ICT companies failing to tackle human rights abuses in supply chains

In a new analysis of how the world's 49 largest ICT businesses are protecting against human rights abuses in their supply chains, the average score is just 30%.

Princes states that export PRNs (PERNs) are less transparent, due to a limited ability to ensure compliance outside of the UK

Princes commits to no export waste

Food and drink firm Princes has committed to ensuring that all of its packaging is recycled and handled solely by UK re-processors, rather than exporting the waste abroad, to gain more certainty that its packaging is recycled or dealt with appropriately.

The coronavirus has exposed a lack of focus on supply chain sustainability

Coronavirus and globalisation: What next for supply chain sustainability?

Covid-19 has brought global economies to a standstill and knocked the confidence in global and connected trade. Would businesses benefit from pivoting to more localised value chains, or do global supply chains enable a global shift towards a climate-resilient future?

The investors forming the coalition noted that 13 of the 17 banks that financed the Dakota Access Pipeline project were also signatories to the Equator Principles

Equator Principles: Global banks failing to uphold environmental and social risk agreements

An investor coalition representing more than $2.9trn has urged global banks to strengthen efforts that protect the rights of indigenous people and the environment that they rely on.