Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive

DEFINITION: EU legislation which aims to reduce the waste and improve the environmental performance of all materials involved in the life cycle of the electrical and electronic equipment. WEEE, such as household appliances, tools and toys, are dependent upon electrical currents or electromagnetic fields under 100 volt AC or 1500 volt DC.

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