Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Boston Tea Party becomes first coffee chain to ban all disposable cups

It is refreshing to see a smaller coffee chain operator actually tackling the problem head on. I haven''t used any of their coffee shops but will now certainly attempt to try one out!

Mondelez calls for 'brave' collaboration to bring cocoa supply chain out of poverty

It''s crucial to recognise the limite of the programme essentialy consisting on forming farmers.famers know how to increase theirs cacoa productions.the question how would th production profite to them given that the price ils always low.i think another chain should ne brought to th me.The transformation. Transforming cacoa at place will bring more to farmers than thousand of formation that only profit to professionnals...

Mondelez calls for 'brave' collaboration to bring cocoa supply chain out of poverty

It''s crucial to recognise the limite of the programme essentialy consisting on forming farmers.famers know how to increase theirs cacoa productions.the question how would th production profite to them given that the price ils always low.i think another chain should ne brought to th me.The transformation. Transforming cacoa at place will bring more to farmers than thousand of formation that only profit to professionnals...

Mondelez calls for 'brave' collaboration to bring cocoa supply chain out of poverty

It''s crucial to recognise the limite of the programme essentialy consisting on forming farmers.famers know how to increase theirs cacoa productions.the question how would th production profite to them given that the price ils always low.i think another chain should ne brought to th me.The transformation. Transforming cacoa at place will bring more to farmers than thousand of formation that only profit to professionnals...

Open cast coal mine rejection faces High Court challenge

Anyone else find it ironic that they make this appeal citing "security of supply" when the UK has just gone 55 hours without using any coal for Power Generation demonstrating that our reliance on "King Coal" is waning? I also know the location of this proposed extraction site and it would damage a beautiful part of Northumberland - so why don''t we keep the coal in the ground for when/if we really need it?

Ban new petrol and diesel cars in 2030, not 2040, says thinktank

Hi Stephe8dn has 995698

EXCLUSIVE: Costa aims to lead industry transformation with pledge to recycle half a billion coffee c

While this is a step in the right direction, does this action/commitment include the lids (etc) or just the mug? Beyond this, as they seem to state, the better practice will be to remove single use takeaway cups completely from the use chain.

Costa aims to lead industry transformation with pledge to recycle half a billion coffee cups

It is fantastic to see positive recycling stories making the national press, consumers need to know not only that they can recycle paper cups but how. Many coffee shops now have instore recycling, with Starbucks offering to recycle any brand of paper cups, and if you arrive home with your paper cups there are over 300 bringbanks around the country, many in the councils recycling centres, and for the lucky few there is even kerb side collections.

Inside Heathrow 2.0: One week left to register for webinar featuring Airport's chief executive

What sustainable solutions are being put in place for the management of the additional hydrocarbon and glycol run off into the wetlands the expansion of Heathrow will create. Are sustainable solutions being implemented " proactively" to reduce the creation of contamination or "reactively" to deal with the additional contamination that will be result of larger and busier facility in the future.

TODAY AT 2PM: Live behaviour change webinar featuring Tesco and RBS

Do these businesses measure the failure or success through employee engagement metrics in the activity or through the measurement of the objectives / targets of the activity itself?

London startup performs UK's first blockchain energy trade

As Arthur Dally might have said "All nice little earners", no doubt. Any activity has its cost, and those who foot the bill. As always, the end consumer. Ah me! Richard Phillips

Sky and National Geographic join forces in fight against marine plastic pollution

Education is the key to reducing this problem. Especially amongst the younger generations to make them think twice about how they dispose of their waste. Plastic per se isn''t the problem but litter is. Then we need to improve the waste management processes in poorer countries so that waste doesn''t just get dumped to end up in streams and rivers and eventually the sea. The Yellow River and the Ganges/Bhamrhaputra deposit the vast majority of plastic waste into the oceans. Stopping this tidal wave of waste at source will have a massive impact on the oceans

World's largest brewer develops greener way to put bubbles in beer

What a shame this firm''s products are among the least flavoured in their class! Any measures to cut energy inputs must be good, but why not put the money saved into putting more hops into the brews?

The Problem with Solar (and other Renewables) - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Following on about the Thermodynamic Hot Water System I mentioned. Well we took the plunge and got it installed. It''s been garbage and frankly has left me with a sour taste about the whole domestic "renewables" industry. Talk about snake oil. I''m never going to trust any sales person from any aspect of the renewables industry ever again. The biggest load of garbage, hype and baloney ever.

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

It''s not the water source, but the difference in durability for single use vs reusable bottles. Single use bottles degrade faster and therefore are more likely to have plastic leach into the water if reused.

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

I love that Pret is making so many clear actions towards sustainability, but why do they still offer only plastic teaspoons and put milk in a single-use espresso cup? It''d be more symbolic, in my opinion, for their stores to phase out the use of these items for eat-in customers at the very least before implementing a reusable bottle scheme that some customers may be priced out of.

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

I think the sex hormone argument may be overstated - why should refilling a bottle with tap water result in more plasticisers leaching into the water than when it is filled at source? A reused bottle is unlikely to have (tap) water in it for more than a few hours; a bottle of water bought from a convenience store may have had the water in contact with the plastic for several months.

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

A bit steep at 20 although it will make a difference.

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

Single use "plastic bottles" may release plastic into the water which can interfere with sex hormones. (https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/why-not-re-use-plastic-water-danger-dirty-bacteria-bottles-sex-hormones-toilet-a7809696.html). It would be interesting to see a correlation with single use plastic bottle uptake with the reported decrease in fertility rates in the western world. How has supply in glass bottles / cans changed over to plastic bottles during this time period?

Pret launches reusable bottle range to slash consumer plastics waste

My current water bottle is --- a Pret single use carbonated water bottle, reused multiple times with tap water. I''m not sure why more people don''t do this - carbonated water bottles in particular last a long time; I sometimes use non-UK bottles to make it obvious that they are not sold. Many bottles have a "do not reuse" warning - but I have never understood why a single-use bottle should be inherently less safe trhan a multiple use bottle, such as those sold to cyclists.

Video How Landsec is achieving a sustainable future for the built environment

The 10 in the 4th para of the comment above is, of course GBP10 but the pound sign was stripped off!

Video How Landsec is achieving a sustainable future for the built environment

Hi Caroline, I want to pick up on one point in what is otherwise a great demonstration of commitment to sustainability... I am assuming that your claim to procure 100% Renewable Energy is achieved by buying "ordinary" energy which have REGOs attached (Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin), rather than by paying the actual cost of the generation (ROCS/FITS/CFDs) which are borne by all electricity consumers. If this is the case, then the aspiration for the procurement of 100% renewable to "contribute to the 2 oC warming target" could be misplaced - in fact it could actually undermine action on climate change and open up Landsec to possible criticisms, for reasons I want to explain here. One way of thinking about these REGOs is as follows. It is as if my neighbour made a charity contribution of 10 to a cause and I then "bought" the rights to claim this donation exclusively for myself from the charity concerned for just a few pence and published this good deed in my annual report as if it was mine. The fact is that REGOs are not an indication that renewable electricity has been made possible by an organisation - they are merely indications that a given amount of renewable electricity has been *_delivered_* to a user. The "good deed" of creating that renewable electricity in the first place was done by all electricity consumers users who paid the "green levies" on their bills. REGOS, as you know, cost between zero and a few pence per MW - nothing like the cost of creating new renewable generation capacity. I have seen no evidence that they do anything to expand the market despite claims by proponents to the contrary. European REGOS are dominated by very low cost certificates from Scandinavian countries who have large hydro generation and this is one reason that they have been banned in Germany. Furthermore, claiming emissions reductions by acquiring REGOs is incompatible with "PAS 2050:2011 Specification for the assessment of the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of goods and services (2011)", and so I would urge Landsec to use the "location method" of the GHG Protocol rather than the flawed "market method" which allows organisations to claim these reductions as if they are responsible for them. This issue with the reporting standard is because the reduction in emissions in generation is recorded in a decreased average grid factor for all UK energy users (who after all paid for this) which invalidates the same emissions reductions being claimed again by individual organisations (see 7.9.4.1 of the Standard). Claiming these reductions as one''s own using the market method is quite simply double-counting and misleading (despite the Protocol allowing this). Why is this important? Another way to think of REGOS is as permits to pollute - they enable the buyers to sidestep their responsibility to reduce emission. Claims of 100% renewable electricity use have potentially a negative effect on the real objective of reducing absolute CO2 emissions - they enable organisations to give the impression that they - through their own actions - have dramatically lowered their own emissions and so it takes the pressure off concerted efforts on efficiency such as implementing ISO 50001, which takes real effort. The practical test is what effect REGOs and statements of 100% renewable energy use have on progress in addressing climate change? I would say REGOS and the whole RE100 movement represent a negative influence as they a) add nothing to new renewable energy generation (at least I have seen no peer-reviewed evidence of this) and b) give the illusion that an organisation is addressing climate change thereby reducing the pressure on them to take responsibility for their emissions. I was at a recent summit here in Manchester where Kevin Anderson, professor of energy and climate change at the University of Manchester stated that at present rates we will "spend" our carbon budget to meet 2oC warming in just 7 years. There is a real need for urgency in our response. Clearly because of these issues, there is also a reputational risk if an organisation were ever seen to be "gaming" the system, which is why I have always advised my clients to steer well clear from "easy" renewable energy claims and instead focus on making real and deep cuts to emissions in their own operations. On a similar note, I would also urge caution on "science-based" targets (a meaningless term which implies that no other targets have science behind them). I am assuming that the 80% you quote is the goal for the UK economy as a whole - much of which will have nothing to do with Landsec, but will be a product of the wider decarbonisation of electricity generation, transport, land-use, dematerialisation of goods and services, and so forth. Indeed over half the 80% is likely to be achieved by other organisations decarbonisation of your supplies - not something that Landsec (or any other property company) can or should claim for itself (unless you wish to be open to accusations of being "free riders"). This concept of only taking credit for what you have actually influenced is called "additionality" amongst sustainability practitioners and while not in the public parlance it is nevertheless important for folks who want to establish themselves as leaders to be aware of this test of claims. A much more relevant "scientific" target is the Committee on Climate Change''s sectoral target for the UK commercial property sector. If you achieve (or, indeed, exceed) these targets then you are truly making your contribution to the overall goal of 80% across the UK economy. I appreciate the desire to take a leadership position on Climate Change, which is to be applauded. Other initiatives such as the EP100 and placing solar panels on your buildings will have a real impact on the only measure that counts - absolute CO2 emissions. My observations, made in a personal capacity, are not offered as criticisms but as a perspective on what I believe leadership in this complex area requires, borne out of some experience but without a claim to know all the answers! So that you may calibrate my comments, you may be interested to know that I have over 25 year''s experience leading large climate change teams in several major UK consultancies, I am a Fellow of the Energy Institute, a Chartered Energy Manager and am passionate about helping organisations to recognise the risks around climate change and getting them to respond effectively. I have recently written a comprehensive book "Energy and Resource Efficiency without the tears - the complete guide to delivering value and sustaining change in organisations", available free of charge as a PDF at www.sustainsuccess.co.uk. All the best with you efforts, I would be delighted to engage further with you on these topics should you wish, and to be corrected/challenged on any of the points above. Niall Enright BA, MA (Cantab), FEI, CEM

Waitrose to remove disposable coffee cups from stores by autumn

I have noticed that the plastic window in the brown paper bags that Waitrose sell bread in has disappeared. I used to rip it out before recycling. Perhaps it is just a local thing.

Scotland smashes onshore wind record

So-called Carbon Capture and "Storage" (and LEAK) CCS (or CCS-L as it should be called) is a fossil fuel industry scam that cannot reliably store carbon dioxide gas without it leaking sooner or later. Any "climate change plan" is doomed for which CCS-L is vital for it to work, as the Scottish government freely admits its plan is. "The Scottish Government is continuing to support the development of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) as a vital technology to meet our long-term emissions reductions targets." - Statement by the Scottish Government Back to reality. So because CCS-L doesn''t work, won''t ever work then we can easily deduce that the Scottish government WILL NOT EVER "meet their long-term emissions reductions targets", not with that plan that they just published. Any CCS-L dependent climate change plan is a house of cards. Luckily, if Scotland wants and needs a credible climate change plan then here is mine, which I have published under this title "Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020" Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/ * Wind, storage and back-up system designer * Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme * Off-Shore Electricity from Wind, Solar and Hydrogen Power * World''s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? * Modelling of wind and pumped-storage power * Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020 * South America GREAT for Renewable Energy

'Invisible' cement polluters urged to double climate efforts

Why on earth has been EMC cement been actively ignored by the European cement industry for the last 25 years. EMC cement - OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) finely inter-ground with sand or puzzoulanes with up to 50% OPC reduction (and hence CO2 reduction). Bridges built in Norway 20 years ago, one plant operating in Texas, USA. emccement.com

Waitrose to remove disposable coffee cups from stores by autumn

May be a bold move - but the sub title could also be "Waitrose to remove disposable customers from their stores"

Final call for edie readers to take the 'Mission Possible' sustainability survey

Excelente Iniciativa y Campa a en Difundir Modelos de Negocios Sostenibles,Gestion de Recursos Naturales,Energias Renovables,Entorno Construido,Movilidad y Liderazgo Empresarial FELICITACIONES.

Scotland smashes onshore wind record

Keiron is on the ball, as usual! A major consequence of wind farm installation is the damage done to bird and bat population; the total UK death toll is estimated at some three million. This damage is also prevalent on the continent. But it makes money, not too much useful power, but then, that was never the purpose. Richard Phillips

Scotland smashes onshore wind record

March 2018??? Between the 24th and 26th, the whole of the UK''s 18GW of installed wind power, only about 1GW or less was being generated, and at midday on 26th, generation stood at 0.28GW, about one sixtieth of the potential. To quote total generation in GWhours, is a deliberately misleading act. Electricity is useful only at the moment of generation. As Eric Morecambe might have said "All the right electricity; but not necessarily at the right time". How many times does it have to be said?? But big money rules, and science and engineering are thrown out of the window. However, the longer the run, the bigger the crash. Richard Phillips

Scotland smashes onshore wind record

Hardly a shock when they''ve been installing these monsters all over the Highlands like there''s no tomorrow. Breaking records is easy if you keep changing the goalposts so hardly a news item. But what about the damage these wind farms are doing to the landscape of the Highlands? A fragile ecosystem that the SNP claimed it would protect as a wilderness? Millions of tonnes of concrete poured over peat bogs, thousands of miles of access roads bulldozed across the hills changing drainage patterns, scarring the land. Then what happens when the wind doesn''t blow, which does happen up here, and all these turbines become net consumers of power? I''m all for not burning stuff to generate power but the great wind rush is doing more damage to the environment and destroying one of the biggest assets Scotland has, its stunning landscape, than keeping Longannet Power Station open ever would.

Paving the way to a better built environment - The UK Green Building Council Blog

"The UK's built environment accounts directly for 22% of the UK's carbon footprint - rising to 42% if one includes emissions from road and rail transport" Whilst I doubt that rail transport of construction materials contributes much at all to the UK''s carbon footprint. The unnecessary quarrying, crushing and trucking to site of stone to replace existing site soils most certainly does. With the construction of HS2 later this year, massive amounts of crushed stone will quarried for trucking to the numerous construction sites. It has been calculated that the overall environmental impact of using stone for the construction of temporary haul roads and working platforms is between 172 and 240% higher than stabilising the existing site soils. That is fine most people would expect that to be true. What is not fine for those people living or working in the many, mostly rural construction areas will be the road chaos as "pay by load" tipper truckers thunder through small villages and along inadequate country lanes. The Human Toxicity impact of trucking stone to these sites is going to be a far higher count, with levels increasing by a factor of between 277 and 360% over treating just the existing soils. As working with the soils on site is faster, easier and in most cases safer and cheaper. How can this be justified, products are now available to treat all site soils to strengths way beyond those achievable with stone. Prepare for the storm the construction industry in the UK are not listening or learning. Les Ellaby PowerCem Technologies (UK) Ltd

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

@Ben there is nothing special about "baseload" power. Baseload is just a definition of the minimum amount of power required and is therefore suitable for continuous generators such as nuclear. The statistics are not massaged. They are what actually happened and illustrates how flexible the grid is coping with periods as you say when the sun doesn''t shine. It has always been this way. The daily large swings from maximum to minimum have always been there and the grid has coped. New technology is making this task a lot easier and if solar and wind didn''t exist things like demand side response would still be important because the extra flexibility means the existing grid can be run more efficiently and therefore cheaply. Grab the solar and wind when you can but keep a hand close to the big red button on the gas generators. But they are already doing that.

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

@Ben - and even if the wind is blowing if it isn''t above a minimum speed the blades may be turning but the wind turbine is a net consumer of power

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

Solar don''t work in the dark and wind doesn''t blow all the time. You can hype it up all you want and massage the statistics all you like. It wont be long till the renewable split between baseload power generation and renewables will cause blackouts. http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

Solar don''t work in the dark and wind doesn''t blow all the time. You can hype it up all you want and massage the statistics all you like. It wont be long till the renewable split between baseload power generation and renewables will cause blackouts. http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/

How are YOU going to achieve a sustainable future? Take the Mission Possible survey

Sustainability is like an apprenticeship being able to put humans into the sustainability equation so that most see a reason to want to be part of the sustainable future and those that do not have a choice. Join the effort or do not and be left behind until you figure out it to your advantage to be involved. Whether its an individual, non-profit, corporation small or unicorn, or government we all now have one simple reality. We have no border only barrier to problems coming home at a cost no one can now afford due to 20th century silo thinking that still believe money and self-interest for the few is the key to a sustainable world for the few , but growing problems for the community and government . their 20th century tools now have little positive impact and in some cases all it is doing is driving the cost of living and doing business beyond the one thing all at the top require to have asustainable world is not more money by a means for the masses to beable to spend, but not waste on a very small planet with 9 billion and headed to space and do not want to repeat our negative out comes of exploration and dealing with those that are different.

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Well the deed has been done and the EvoHome installed. First thing I have to say is how easy it was to install. Even a Geologist can do it :-). Took a couple of hours to change all the TRVs, bind them to the controller etc and set up the schedules. Even replacing the dumb master thermostat for the smart relay was easy. The only thing I didn''t get was the HW control unit as we were planning on installing a renewable HW system (more on that disaster in a separate blog post I think). Early days as to how much it will save, going to take a year to really get an idea as I know how much oil we bought last year (3000+ litres) so need to compare like for like to get as accurate figure as possible. However the early indications suggest we should have a more comfortable, efficient home thanks to the precision temperature setting, the scheduling of when heat is actually required and where (we have 12 heating zones now all individually programmed) and being able to get rid of that stupid master thermostat. We don''t control our energy efficient lighting from a single switch in the hall so why do we still do it with our central heating?

Waitrose builds on plastics pledge by switching to paper straws in cafes

Roger, we will investigate and report back, next week. Luke might you (it takes 3 mins) sign our petition at https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/stircrazy-1-pret-a-manger-plastic-stirrers-why ?

Inside Heathrow 2.0: edie webinar to discuss Airport's sustainability progress

What progress has been made with Sustainability Plan Goal 6.2 ? launch a cycling plan and strayegy in 2017 ? deliver cycling infrastructure into the Central Terminal Area in 2017 ? Still waiting.......

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

Roger - I agree the grid is capable of dealing with large fluctuations in demand but that is down to the flexibility of the supply and the traditional "baseload" generators. I just wanted to make sure the fact that on many occasions we had to rely on coal fired stations to make up for the lack of any renewables. In an ideal world we would be able to manage without backup systems but it is an unwise man that works without a safety net

Waitrose builds on plastics pledge by switching to paper straws in cafes

I noticed that bread bought this week from Waitrose was in a single paper bag. Bread bought last week had a plastic "window" in the same bag making it a recycling problem. It seems to me that the plastic straw problem is confined to families with young children, a period of a few years. I have spent years ripping out the plastic film in waitrose bread bags. the straw problem could have been stopped years ago and nobody would have noticed.

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

Keiron, I think that the point of this story is that there were many days when fewer coal fired stations were required thanks to wind and solar. An idle coal burner may be costing some money but it is not creating CO2. With accurate forecasting and the availability of flexible gas generation and a few other techniques, the grid can better utilise the available wind and solar. Don t forget the grid spends all day switching generation off and on. On March 6th for example the supply changed from a peak of about 45GW to 27GW in a few hours so the grid is equipped to cope with intermittent wind and solar. Some may argue that we are wasting money by having back up for renewables but that extra money is the price of carbon reduction.

Waitrose builds on plastics pledge by switching to paper straws in cafes

Our thoughts are - we couldn''t think of a single-use plastic (SUP) that was more superfluous, more forgettable and needless. We use them |(stirrers) and they then last for centuries (unless you incinerate). There are such plentiful and easy alternatives - metal teaspoon, bamboo, FSC-certified wood from sustainable sources. Re-thinking use of plastic at the most core level, starts a process of challenging every bit of SUP. And this #StirCrazy campaign is just the beginning of a series of campaigns, challenging them all, in time. Three questions to you Edie readers please: 1) what other SUPs are easy to be challenged? and 2) Can you improve our slogan "Re-think you use of plastic - don''t stir with it. We don''t!" Please let us know - here on Edie, and at info@clearpublicspace.org? and 3) you could sign our petition at https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/stircrazy-1-pret-a-manger-plastic-stirrers-why ? That would really help 1/3 of our first year objectives! thanks thanks

In Practice: The 'world-first' closed-loop glass recycling facility

We had, what can be classed as a closed-loop glass recycling system, when we used to return glass bottles, back to the suppliers, to be re-used, again and again. Not just thrown on-mass into a recycling bin, to be used as aggregate or to be sent to China.

Co-op unveils 50% recycled plastic bottles for own-brand water

On the subject of a deposit return scheme just hop on a short flight to Stavanger or Oslo and go into any supermarket and see how they do it. Cans and plastic bottles get fed into a unit like a vending machine where they are scanned and the machine pays out - kids get their pocket money this way. And dont ask who pays for it - the consumer is the only one who can pay either directly or indirectly - the question is only one of how to get it kick started and that is not difficult either.

Wind and solar make more electricity than nuclear for first time in UK

All well and good but remember there have been many days when we had to switch coal fired stations on to fill the gap in supply when wind and solar were producing next to nothing. Solar of course doesn''t provide any power at night and very limited when it is raining, snowing or plain old fashioned overcast. Wind turbines need a minimum wind speed to produce enough electricity to power themselves, below this they are actually net consumers of power. By way of examples: 09:20 2nd Nov 2017 - wind and solar 0.8 and 1.2GW out of 42.5GW demand. Coal 4.5GW, Nuclear 8.3GW, Gas 24.2GW 09:13 19th Feb 2018 - wind and solar 2.3GW and 0.16GW out of 43GW demand. Coal 3.9GW, Nuclear 8.0GW, Gas 23.6GW 11:35 6th March 2018 - wind and solar 2.5GW and 3GW out of 44GW demand. Coal 7.3GW, Nuclear 8.3GW, Gas 18.9GW These are just 3 examples but there were many other periods when renewables were providing less than 10% of UK demand and for prolonged periods of time. Whilst yes there are times when the balance is reversed it is not reliable enough to switch off coal, nuclear or gas anytime soon. There needs to be a degree of perspective maintained in the discussion. I would also like to point out that I believe we will have to cut our reliance on burning things to generate electricity in the future but that we can not rely on irregular supplies such as wind and solar without backup options.

Sustainability a competitive advantage for business, says Nespresso boss

I wonder what the life-cycle impacts of the capsules are, even if they use the kerbside collection service? The plastic bags they are collected in, the physical moving around of the collection vehicles, etc.? Somehow I suspect that it''s not at all good.

Mars launches Farmer Income Lab to help eradicate smallholder poverty

Thanks for sharing the blog. Eradicating the poverty in the rural areas is very important for the economic development. Thus, many of the NGO''s like mission humanitaire (http://www.mission-humanitaire-afrique.org) work hard to eradicate the poverty by helping the less fortunate people.

'Unanswered questions': Green community reacts to the UK's deposit return scheme plans

Now retired, but spent a lifetime being part of change. Including creating Blockchain technology in 1995 that helped test new ways of doing things, up until 2010 when the formally trained thinking got in the way of innovation and collaboration. So required me as the founder to return as Interim CEO/Pres. Remove money and self-interest and every problem has a solution. It is not want you do, but how you do it. Most formally trained believe technology is the key to a more sustainable world. In reality, it just a tool that requires a little innovation and collaboration and simplifying not what you do, but how you do it. Then apply technology to simplify how you do it so that people become a key part of the solution, not always seen as a financial liability and a reality inflation based on paying more to get less may be sustainable for a privileged few. The Glocal economic engine sustainability is based on the masses having the means to support that system or it will collapse due to not understanding now simple economic and business works and what happens when humans are left with not left to lose and make bad choices. Due to reacting before thinking, Then realize their in a situation that was easy to get into but how hard to get out of. Think of the solution to going green all about removing money as the barrier to being the incentive but think outside the box on how to make it simple.

Elephant dung paper and 'Farming Trees': the best green innovations of the week

Considering the aggravation I''m having at the moment with existing compostable packaging and finding a composting plant to take the waste, I think we''re coming at this from the wrong angle.

Elephant dung paper and 'Farming Trees': the best green innovations of the week

i''m sure the development and use of bioplastics will grow rapidly in the near future, with the increased focus on conventional plastic disposal. Any development is to be applauded, but the issue of disposal of coffee pods is somewhat more complex, when many contain a range of materials including metals. Be interesting to see how industrial composting and AD plants will respond and cope with that.

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

@Keiron. Fair points and it depends on how deep you are getting into decarbonisation. Gas with CCS is likely to be part of the solution to decarbonise electricity but when you need to start decarbonising heat in industry and in the home hydrogen is potentially a big player and there is then good synergy with transport. If you want to go deeper on this look at work that has been done by the ETI

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

@Andrew - Again we take a perfectly usable fuel and convert it into something else using steam which has to be created in some way. Correct me if I am wrong here but isn''t that extremely inefficient? How do you create the steam for instance? Why not just develop CCS for natural gas power stations and cut out the middle man? Given the majority of homes in Britain use gas for heating isn''t it preferable to keep the gas for that than wastefully convert it to Hydrogen and still have an issue with CO2 emissions.

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

To pick up on earlier comments the first thing to remember is that hydrogen isn''t really a fuel but an energy vector which can move and store large amounts of clean energy. You can equally ask why do you take electricity, turn it into chemical energy in a battery then turn it back into electricity! But more importantly whilst using electrolysis is a good way to get hydrogen going at a small scale, the most practical and cost effective way of making clean hydrogen at the scale needed to make a difference will be through steam methane reforming of natural gas with CCS

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

The reason why its important to invest in hydrogen as like petrol and diesel engines it can be scaled to any size big or small. The electric vehicle is ideal and very important for the every day driver going to work and back, what about haulage/logistics or the emergency services? They need the power and certainty that hydrogen provides.

ESOS - The Challenges Last Time - The Eshcon blog

It is also worth noting that the Phase 1 Evidence Pack must be issued to the Phase 2 Lead Assessor. This is not in the EA Guide but it is in the legislation.

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

@Gary - kind of agree with you, why waste the electricity to create Hydrogen to then use the Hydrogen to create electricity? Does seem mad. Only reason I can see for a FCEV is for the Fuel Cell to act in the same way an ICE does in current hybrids to extend the range by offering onboard power generation. For people like myself who live in remote areas this is a big concern. It can easily be 50 miles between charge points which for smaller EV''s can be at the limit of range in winter, which then means an 80% charge which means even less range to get to the next charge point. A Fuel Cell on board could extend the range to make it comfortable to drive from Fort William to Glasgow.

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

Why waste millions on hydrogen vehicles when fully electric vehicles will be the more efficient and cleaner transport means for the future?

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

Why waste millions on hydrogen vehicles when fully electric vehicles will be the more efficient and cleaner transport means for the future?

World Water Day - How we can ensure resilience of our water supplies - The BITC blog

Interesting article and thought provoking as we have long considered Britain to be awash with water. It certainly seems like it here in Fort William :-) Perhaps one way to help people realise how much water they are using is "smart" meters that show exactly how much water they are using. Instead of the meter in the street or stuck in a cupboard bring it out in to the open like the smart meters used by power companies. Even little things like turning the tap off while you brush your teeth or wash you hands can have an impact. When we are on the boat with a very limited water store (310 litres) we even turn the shower off while we soap up and shampoo our hair. A limited supply focusses the mind wonderfully on how much you use. Another option would be to research some way to reuse the "grey" water safely for non consumptive uses, such as flushing the loo or watering the garden. Using potable water to flush the loo just seems like a tremendous waste, of water and energy.

Shell opens first-of-its-kind hydrogen refuelling station

While this is a step towards eventually weaning our personal transport from burning oil there is still the major problems with Hydrogen that keep getting swept under the carpet. Firstly it is highly explosive and has to be kept stored under high pressure. This means very heavy, very strong pressure tanks. Hydrogen also leaks so if you leave the car for a few days you could come back to an empty tank. Secondly producing Hydrogen by electrolysis needs massive amounts of electricity and very pure water which needs large chemical filters. It takes nearly 3 times as much energy to produce the hydrogen than you get back from it. Making Hydrogen one of the most inefficient fuels for transportation. And don''t say "we will use the excess electricity" as where is the excess? Even now with the coal, oil and gas power stations available there is not an excess of clean electricity. In the future this is likely to be even less available as our electricity demand is only going to increase.

UPS's London delivery fleet powered by 'world-first' smart charging system

Hi Alex, As the article states, this charging system is believed to be a world-first on this scale. Thanks, George

Onshore wind and solar could compete for subsidies in CfDs

Great, that means more acres of pristine Highland wilderness ripped up for concrete bases and the stunning scenery decimated by unsightly white monstrosities. The environmental damage wind farms cause to delicate habitats in the Highlands is untold. Watersheds disrupted, peat bogs destroyed, massive erosion due to ripping up the ground cover. This truly is a case where being "green" is nothing of the sort. Start building these ghastly things around London, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and other major metropolitan areas where the people that demand the power are. Stop destroying the remote wild areas of the country. And no I am not a NIMBY. I can see the hydroelectric supply pipes for the Lochaber Smelter from my window and I''d happily have an additional set of them if it meant another 80MW hydro power station in the town.

Leeds cuts ribbon on 'revolutionary' ?35m heat network

Hi there, I''d suggest having a look at Casey Cole''s twitter. https://twitter.com/caseyguru There should be some links to his blog which will contain a lot of the answers about district heating industry assumptions you''re probably looking for.

Behaviour change: Tesco and RBS to discuss engagement strategies in edie's next webinar

Improving business results AND the lives of the employees that drive those results through engagement is great. But wouldn''t it be better to address that directly, by empower employees to think and act like owners? Industry leaders, like Southwest Airlines, Capital One and BHP Billiton, and hundreds of private companies empower employees to think and act like owners, driving and participating in the profitable growth of the company. These Forbes and Harvard Business Review articles provide more background: https://hbr.org/2018/01/more-than-a-paycheck http://www.forbes.com/sites/fotschcase/2016/05/31/engage-your-employees-in-making-money/

UPS's London delivery fleet powered by 'world-first' smart charging system

World''s First Smart charging System. Great UPS FAKE NEWS. There are already hundreds of SCSystems out on the market.

Leeds cuts ribbon on 'revolutionary' ?35m heat network

I took Eon to court last year as they stamped price promise guarantee that their heat networks would not cost more than alternatives however the comparator relied upon the heat provider was based on combi boilers as oppose to regular gas boilers. Also Eon selected 5 combi boilers that were more suitable for for 4-5bed houses as oppose to a modern 2bed 1bath flat. The leading heat provider failed to also declare the effectiveness of the heat units that require more energy than alternatives. What is a concern the industry base their calculation on the customers meter readings and not measuring the effectiveness of the heat units. By providing oversized heat plates inside a limited insulated heat unit with a delay opening control valve leads to poor efficiency on an alleged environmental friendly heating system. By measuring the performance of the heat box it s quite possible there is no environmental benefit in comparison to alternatives. By cross referencing a customers usage in the summer with their water consumption it s possible to identify a customer used enough energy to heat all their mains water to 38c including the toilet water. Where is the data showing the performance of a simply Day to Day usage of these heat networks?

The Crown Estate deploys London's first air purifying CityTree

This is interesting and an exciting development. Perhaps in a few years we will see the sides of entire buildings being "greened"? Not just with things like this but with proper vertical, hanging gardens, rooftop gardens and even window boxes full of green plants all doing their bit to clean the air in our towns and cities.

The path to public-sector sustainability is paved with good intentions - The Carbon Trust blog

Fine words, but some of the basics are being ignored. Someone within the Carbon Trust needs to do a deep survey into the costs of hard water, such as wasting energy in water heating and cooling systems, increased maintenance and downtime and most importantly the cost to this fragile earth of having to replace equipment, appliances and fixtures & fittings that do not survive their designed life due to damage caused by hard water limescale

Why cities are switching to renewables - The CDP Blog

Given the vast acreage of roof space in towns and cities sitting there empty it annoys me that people in towns like to brag about "going green" and being 100% renewable when their power comes from building wind farms in pristine wilderness areas like the Scottish Highlands. Time for every large town and city in UK to step up to the plate and put words into action. Stop destroying the countryside and put the power generation where it is needed, on your own doorsteps. If Burlington can do it I see no reason why London can''t

In Practice: The UK's Northern hydrogen heating grid trial

Thanks! Very interesting piece, including Stats & Facts, albeit, I see nothing here regarding Anaerobic Gas utilisation i.e. when AG producing matter is all around: sometimes already used for Electricity production into National Grid Thanks again

Are reuse and refill missing pieces of our sustainable packaging jigsaw? - The sustainable innovatio

Chris, I agree that we have to get away from single use (anything) particularly given how little is recycled (for all the various reasons including not being clean). That''s more where I was coming from with the old milk bottles as we knew they were being cleaned, refilled and reused. Think you are right that we need to look at all these kinds of things on a case by case basis as what works for one thing might not be appropriate elsewhere.

Are reuse and refill missing pieces of our sustainable packaging jigsaw? - The sustainable innovatio

Hi Kieron and Dominic, Thanks for the comments. I''ve actually read, counter-intuitively, that glass milk bottle refills are worse than our single-use recycled bottles (https://juliahailesblog.blogspot.co.uk/2018/01/a-lot-of-rubbish-is-talked-about.html, based I think on WRAP studies). Other research suggests that glass bottle refills work best for local/regional supply chains. I don''t think this invalidates my call for more packaging refill & reuse, just that you need to take things in a case-by-case, and category-by-category basis. Thanks again. Chris

Veolia opens 'world-first' closed-loop glass recycling facility

An excellent project but we must not lose sight of the fact that bottles can have a life of around 12 round trips if they are returned, washed and reused before they must be recycled. All the glass manufacturing is done in the NE of the country meaning a glass bottle is transported many miles before its single use and then many miles back for recycling. So much energy could be saved by reusing the glass bottle locally

Greater Manchester launches ?15m infrastructure renewables fund

Customers using district heating need to be very cautious with regards to the marketing claims . My property is associated with a heat network whereby the supplier offered price promise guarantee and fair price policy . The comparator used by the energy company was a misrepresentation to the equipment and service provided - so I took them to court. They did attempt to use the customer protection scheme Heat Trust as an independent comparator but they failed to disclose in their witness report the self regulator online comparator was based on a combi as oppose to a heat-only HIU that requires a customer to preheat their hot water. Also there was a concern the Head of Community at Eon was also a director of the Heat Trust - impartiality? During the first court hearing the judge concluded the session with we could be on a tip of an iceberg . After two court hearings judgement went against the energy giant who was ordered to pay approximately 50% heat charges back covering almost 3yrs usage plus court fees. The comparator also fails to factor the performance and behaviour of supplied HIU. Due to the configuration unbeknown to the customer some heat boxes could consume more KWh in comparison to alternatives. Therefore the comparison is not as straightforward as associated with some online comparators.

Greater Manchester launches ?15m infrastructure renewables fund

Customers using district heating need to be very cautious with regards to the marketing claims . My property is associated with a heat network whereby the supplier offered price promise guarantee and fair price policy . The comparator used by the energy company was a misrepresentation to the equipment and service provided - so I took them to court. They did attempt to use the customer protection scheme Heat Trust as an independent comparator but they failed to disclose in their witness report the self regulator online comparator was based on a combi as oppose to a heat-only HIU that requires a customer to preheat their hot water. Also there was a concern the Head of Community at Eon was also a director of the Heat Trust - impartiality? During the first court hearing the judge concluded the session with we could be on a tip of an iceberg . After two court hearings judgement went against the energy giant who was ordered to pay approximately 50% heat charges back covering almost 3yrs usage plus court fees. The comparator also fails to factor the performance and behaviour of supplied HIU. Due to the configuration unbeknown to the customer some heat boxes could consume more KWh in comparison to alternatives. Therefore the comparison is not as straightforward as associated with some online comparators.

Moss-covered recycled tyre combats air pollution on the go

What happens when the moss gets covered in dust and grime from the road, potentially clogging up the plants? Also, what effect would salt and other chemicals have on the plants? I wonder if this has been tested at all?

Moss-covered recycled tyre combats air pollution on the go

Oh dear, greenwash at its finest! I have two main objections to this: 1) Biosecurity. Moss would act as a carrier for plant and animal life that would be more or less indiscriminately moved around. I can''t see the EU allowing a car with moss tyres to cross an external border, but I suppose that would mean we wouldn''t see them in England. 2) More seriously, the effect is negligible. A typical car doing 10,000 miles a year emits at least 3 tonnes of CO2. the article envisage them being fitted on "2.5 million travelling vehicles" (odd turn of phrase) that would have emissions of at least 7.5mn tonnes annually. I say "at least", as I imagine their calculations include buses, taxis and delivery vehicles, some of which may, of course, have three or more axles. Even so, if it could save 4,000 tCO2 that represents approximately 0.05% of the emissions from those same vehicles. The initial WHO quote on air quality refers to particulates not CO2. The rolling moss would not, I suspect, address this, as PM10 from tyres comes from the rubber surface in contact with the road (necessary for grip) as the tyre is gradually worn down. I don''t see how these tyres will address that issue at all, unless the 3D printing process using recycled tyres somehow produces a surface less prone to scrubbing down. Or are the particulates somehow trapped in the moss, like a filter? Oh, was this released early? Should it have been issued on 1st April?

Plastic-free aisles and seaweed sachets: Six brand new business plans to tackle plastic waste

The initiative by Ecoplaza is good step toward sustainable supply chain. It is inspirational, contagious shall help many more to think in this direction and motivate innovators for next level of solution.

Are reuse and refill missing pieces of our sustainable packaging jigsaw? - The sustainable innovatio

Good article, thanks. Agree inertia is a huge issue with this, and health and safety concerns/risk perception by business in particular, but have started to see it happen with Ecover at local healthfood stores, and some Unilever brands do now if I recall correctly. Interestingly Kieron I recently heard an article saying a glass milk bottle needs to be reused 20 times before the carbon emissions & energy use are level with single-use recycled plastic bottles! Of course, the potential plastic waste reduction still makes it a positive move in another way

?555bn pension funds questioned over climate risk 'misunderstandings'

I would like to make two points: - 1. The Bank of England''s June report on the financial risks associated with climate change addressed a number of issues, including the point at which fossil fuel assets will very suddenly become almost worthless. See page 103 of this pdf and note in the small print the reference to "uncertainties in climate processes and feedbacks". Those fedbacks have now begun to emerge and at significant force (e.g. albedo in the Arctic and the release of methane from melting permafrost). Financial investors desperately need to pay very close attention to the science. https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/quarterly-bulletin/2017/the-banks-response-to-climate-change.pdf?la=en&hash=7DF676C781E5FAEE994C2A210A6B9EEE44879387 2. The Taskforce should note that the UK has ratified COP21. We are no longer aiming to keep temperatures to 2C, we have promised the world that we will contribute to keeping temperatures "to well below 2C and pursue efforts towards 1.5C".

The wrong side of history? 7 baffling climate-sceptic quotes

In Marco Rubio''s defence "Governments can''t change the weather" anymore than Canute could turn back the tide. We can''t control climate either as climate is just ''weather averaged over a given area for a given period of time''. What we can do though is minimise our impact on our planet which may have an effect on weather and therefore climate

Ikea boosts sustainable products and renewable energy sourcing

"generating the equivalent of 73% of the energy it used " The pivotal word is "equivalent". Electricity is only usable at the moment of generation. All renewable electricity is fed to the grid, but if more is needed we call on standby generation. Standby is essential, but uneconomic. Renewable electricity may be described as "All the right electricity, but not necessarily at the right time". Richard Phillips

Ofwat accuses water firms of being ill-prepared for adverse weather

Severe Freeze? It wasn''t that severe or for that long. What was the lowest overnight temperature during the Beast from the East, about -10, we see that and lower in parts of Scotland every winter but our pipes don''t freeze all the time. Plus it takes time for the ground to freeze to depth, which is why Ground Source Heat Pumps are touted as a sustainable option for heating. So what I want to know is how did these Mains water pipes freeze when temperatures were not that low or for that long? Was it all domestic mains pipes that were unlagged that froze and burst or is there something else at play here? Lastly what does this mean for GSHP if water pipes can freeze underground if it gets a "wee bit chilly" for a week?

Energy innovation: Next edie webinar to explore 'smart grid of the future'

All well and good, renewable smart grids are the only way ahead. However, we need to face some harsh realities when talking about "ROI" Growth or "Business opportunities" when transitioning from the high energy of fossil fuel and it''s many uses (80% of everything we do) , to renewable energy infrastructure. We had a 50 to 1 "Net Energy" ratio available for the economy (society) 30 years ago and now we have a NET ENERGY of between 8 and 13 to 1. By any measure something has to give, our lives are about to be forcibly simplified as "cheap" fossil fuel-derived energy runs out. We need to dig up the materials for renewables too, solar panels, turbines and other equipment (Electric Cars and IT infrastructure?) need energy to make them, transport them and use them. The UK uses 1.25 watts per square metre or about 124kWh/person/day. Wind can produce 2.5 Watts per metre squared..... so...... as long as we are okay with HALF the UK land mass (or sea and land mass equivalent) covered in wind turbines we will be fine? Or Solar Panels (0.5kWh/m2) across the whole of Yorkshire? We need to do the maths and get real about the impact heading our way. There is no escaping the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics, regardless of the technology; we have never created any "new" energy in all of human history. A question to answer is "What kind of lifestyle can we expect from a "Low NET ENERGY" economy? We can''t go on using 24% of the Earth''s photosynthesis, it simply is not sustainable.

The big plastics debate: Industry must be fearless in zero-waste pursuit, Iceland claims

I find this all very exciting as it is an example of consumer thoughts about packaging waste starting to drive innovation. This is being used no doubt to increase market share for Iceland but this is a good thing if it forces the issue of other retailers following suit. Goodbye plastic rubbish!!

Sir Richard Branson: Commercial low-carbon jet fuel 'within touching distance'

The scale of the climate crisis demands that aviation becomes carbon neutral. In addition the COP 21 commitment requires that we adopt policies that will keep global temperatures "well below 2C". So, while this fuel project has the potential to reduce emissions, it most certainly does not provide a path to zero carbon emissions. Consequently the environmental movement, indeed all those who worry about the pace of climate change, will continue to demand a large reduction in the aviation sector and that the industry be required to pay now for full carbon capture & sequestration of CO2 equivalent to that which the sector emits.

Network Rail to roll out free water fountains at national stations

It would be good to see water fountains rolled out for dogs across the nation. The UK and the US spend as much money on dogs as on children according to many statistics. Dogs thrive on Alkaline Water as do Humans, whilst looking at water fountains you should take a look at a company called WET Water Enhanced Technologies

Are reuse and refill missing pieces of our sustainable packaging jigsaw? - The sustainable innovatio

Time to bring back the Milkman with his electric milk float and all those old fashioned yet ultimately reuse-able, refillable and recyclable glass pint bottles. If I remember Unigate used to use each bottle 20 times before it was melted down to make a new one. Now that''s sustainable.

Renewable output rises by more than a quarter in the UK

With the current cold weather the grid is currently running on 22% coal power. Dirty power is still required to make the short falls in demand and will so until a major breakthrough is made in efficient storage solutions, even then we''ll still need baseload generating systems. The only solution that fits this need is nuclear power. We will have to build another 15 Hinckley point power station just to power the electric cars by 2045 but saying there isn''t enough copper in the ground to power all these electric cars. The electrical infrastructure needs major investment to support the energy hungry devices of the future you can check how much dirty power is being used live on the grid http://www.gridwatch.templar.co.uk/ The statistic in this article are a stretch of the truth at best

Plastic-free aisles and seaweed sachets: Six brand new business plans to tackle plastic waste

The Ekoplaza store looks like plastic to me. Even if it''s a biodegradable plastic, it''s still plastic. It still needs a disposal route and the logical one would be into food waste collections. However, that is not allowed in the UK; I suspect that it''s not allowed in the Netherlands either. That means that we would be replacing one plastic that can''t be recovered with another plastic that can''t be recovered.

British retailers linked to polluting supplier factories

Why does it take, again and again, third party reports to identify supply chain malpractice? These brands are profitable and pay dividends to shareholders- maybe a little more money spent by the brands on their own supply chain auditing would be appropriate?

German court rules cities can ban diesel cars to tackle pollution

Above: "Experts estimate that excessive amounts of nitrogen oxides or NOx in the air kill between 6,000 and 13,000 people in Germany every year" -picture. Would this be, by some remote chance, a repetition of the "pollution kills 40.000 per year in the UK??? I would suggest that this is another example of the uninformed grabbing a figure which is actually an epidemiological figure of "equivalent lives", a method of expressing a small statistical shortening of the lives of the whole population by a few days or weeks. Something any individual will be unable to detect. But it sure scares the hell out of the non-epidemiologist, the general population in fact. But only if it is good for the "green" businesses. Richard Phillips

B Corp businesses grow 28 times faster than national average

Katie Hill from B Lab UK - Edie: thank you for printing this great news story about B Corps who are delivering good performance as well as creating positive impact. I would like to clarify for readers that the 14% annual growth rate refers to the 44 UK B Corps across a range of sectors that have re-certified after 2 years as a B Corp. This is not referring to the whole of the B Corp community as we do not have that data yet. Every B Corp has to go through re-certification after two years to ensure that they still meet our standards. Please do see more information at www.bcorporation.uk Thank you!

NAO: Renewable Heat Incentive has not achieved value for money

As the Chairman of Vbboiler.co.uk, funding boiler retrofits on a pay as you save basis, we concur with the comment "people don t behave like automata driven by economic information we respond as people, and changing your heating system, like having your house insulated, is a major upheaval, . unfortunately the benefits of energy saving measures don''t outweigh the perceived inconvenience. But who can blame the clients if installers and used car sales man are perceived as the least desirable people.

NAO: Renewable Heat Incentive has not achieved value for money

@Chris - in addition I would like to point out that my sustainable hot water system is capable of providing 300l of hot water to 60C every day regardless of weather or sunlight, day and night. We still have the emergency electric immersion as a back up for when it is extremely cold (that is below -10C for a prolonged period) but fundamentally we do not need the boiler at all. Now if that shouldn''t qualify it for some kind of assistance or reward then I don''t know what should. That''s my argument about the RHI it rewards systems that still rely on fossil fuels but ignores one that doesn''t.

NAO: Renewable Heat Incentive has not achieved value for money

@ Chris - well I stand corrected on your particular version of Solar Thermal but for where I live in the NW Highlands any form of solar suffers from the unescapable truth that it is frequently miserable, cold and during winter dark.

NAO: Renewable Heat Incentive has not achieved value for money

Well, Keiron; We have a solar thermal panel that enables us to turn off our boiler for ALL our hot water needs from April to October, and even on a dull day in winter will raise the bottom half of our 250 litre tank to 25 degrees c. On a sunny day last week, in mid February, it raised the whole tank to the cut-off temperature of 67c. Hardly "virtually useless." Please get your facts right! You are .also wrong on wood burning. A decent burner produces minimal particulates and NOx, and only transport costs add to any global warming.

Government 'dragging its feet' over deposit return scheme for plastics, MPs claim

Recycling plastic packaging materials is difficult mainly due to the great variety, produced to meet its many applications. Specialist packaging is not producible from waste but needs specific formulation. The problem lies in the disposal of materials of great variety from a great many specific sources. Drink bottles arise from two sources; the clear plastic bottles, and the opaque variety. these are easily distinguished. The specific collection of these bottles, mixed with no other waste, would provide a simple recycling route for these materials. The residual mixture, which could include a variety of food packaging, is best disposed of by burning, under highly controlled conditions, in an electrical generating plant, perhaps, under advantageous conditions, also providing some district heating. The process is not a technically difficult one, but administratively requires countywide national Governmental organisation. Private undertakings, specified to be the first choice by the Thatcher Government, will be disjointed and cherry picking; only profit making processes would be approached. Herein lies the problem, not technology but Governmental. It won''t be done until we have a number of physical scientifically qualified Ministers in the Cabinet, and that is long way off; at present they listen only to business lobbies, hence today''s chaos. Here endeth the first lesson!

NAO: Renewable Heat Incentive has not achieved value for money

Quelle Surprise!! For a start the RHI does not actually encourage clean energy as it is fundamentally flawed towards inefficient systems and to burning wood, which is now being shown to create more air pollution than "smokeless" fuels. As an example I have installed an Thermodynamic Hot Water System that works in the same way as Ground, Air and Water source heat pumps to give me 100% of my hot water needs without burning anything (bar a few watts to power the pump). British built, clean, green and sustainable but NOT elegible for RHI. Solar Thermal though is although it is virtually useless in UK and at best only provides 30% of hot water needs. Time to totally revamp the system of domestic (and industry) subsidies to properly encourage people to move away from traditional heating and hot water systems and to encourage British companies to design and develop the next generation of sustainable heating

Plastics and packaging: The UK's 'waste mountain' in charts

Again, it is its end reprocessing that has fallen down. It''s ok to recycle it, but who is prepared to take the collected material ? With mixed paper at 10 per tonne, no-one is going to make a profit, so why lose money to process it ? China doesn''t want our collected plastic. Waste to Energy is the key. With a greater power demand looming from EVs, we need power. We have a mountain of waste - use it. Industrial emissions are not a problem, because the cleaning process is so good these days.

Plastics and packaging: The UK's 'waste mountain' in charts

Are UK recycling rates stagnating because there is not a coordinated recycling scheme across the country, WRAP said there is a plan to do something by 2024 but that is not going to help recycling rates today. Once we have a coordinated recycling scheme across the country, packaging manufacturers can put clear instructions on the packaging as how best to dispose of it, i.e wash out and put in purple bin, we can then have national marketing campaigns, and best of all consumers can make a informed choice when purchasing products, knowing if it is recyclable or not.

Renewable output rises by more than a quarter in the UK

How to lie with statistics Most of the statements are partial observations, generalized to average performance figures. Is it that bad with CO2 reduction and renewables in the UK?

Renewable output rises by more than a quarter in the UK

I''m not convinced by the statement that "carbon intensity of less 100gCO2/kWh" when solar panels have a carbon life cycle cost from cradle to grave of 80gCO2/kWh. This is all good news but wait until the grid hits 45% to 60% renewables then we will start to see rolling blackouts and grid response shortages that will effect the power stability in the coming years. Solar and wind doesn''t work in the dark on a still breathless night, the only thing saving the grid are large 150Mw instantaneous gas fired turbines that emit more pollution than a standard combined cycle gas fired plant,. we''re a long way away from any storage solution that will support the grids current input by renewables , a long way ....

Sustainability index reveals North-South divide among local authorities

It is a myth that there is an issue about the financial stability of Councils. First Councils cannot go broke.Second their reserves have increased 150% in real terms over the last 10years. Councils are like despots the world over.Keep repeating a lie often enough and it becomes a false fact Best Tony Williams

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

Hmmm, missing some key points still:- 1) You need high quality de-ionised water to make electrolytic hydrogen - you there fire need a water purification system which itself consumes energy. Can t just use sea water... 2) if you did make hydrogen out at sea how do you get it on land? Liquefaction is an minus 260 deg C and would freeze the water around the pipes and affect marine life...as well as using up 25-30% of the energy. 3) Carbon capture and storage is another myth - you need to liquify CO2 (whichbuses energy) then pump it out to sea and down 1km into old oil wells where the underground temp is around 80 deg C so would gasify the CO2 and cause pressure increase. Might be why no one has done it yet. 4) if you could do CCS then the North Sea could hold only 10-15 years worth of CO2 then what... We need realistic, cost effective and pragmatic solutions not the continuous promise of jam tomorrow ....

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

The fuel cells currently use platinum but the amount is measured in grammes and not kilogrammes as for lithium and cobalt in battery vehicles. The amount of platinum is only two or three times that used in a car''s catalytic converter. The good news is that research is very close to producing a commercial fuel cell that does not need platinum. Hydrogen reforming needs to be combined with carbon capture. We have enough old gas fields for this. However, electrolysis using renewable energy should not suffer from shortage of water as we are an island nation. With the recent development in wind turbines I would be interested to hear the opportunities, logistics and costs for deep and water-far from shore generation and compression of hydrogen. A big concern I have is the social impact of battery vehicles. They suit those with the off-road charging facilities but not those with more humble dwellings or in city centres. Also as fuel stations reduce due to increased EVs life will become more difficult for those members off our society that cannot afford these vehicles. Future developments may produce batteries that do not use rare elements. However, looking at whole life pollution some current Tesla vehicles are more polluting than modern petrol cars. Whatever happens smart road taxes is the only way forward for government to maintain their tax revenues.

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

How Twinings is championing women's rights in the tea supply chain

What about the #plastic impact? Twinings are silent on their tea bags and packaging. They introduced plastic pouches and synthetic bags to add insult to injury.

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

Many specialists in the energy arena, including me, are skeptical that the widespread increase in EV transport is going to be successful anytime soon.. Looking back 40 years, the CEO of IBM was quoted as saying " The PC will never catch on". If true that would explain why the USA called the desktop IBM PC "peanut" The user reality for a wholly Battery driven vehicle is a lot different to the ICE solution. Just wait until they find out the cost and practicality of an SUV and MPV EV. Mitsubishi has a saleable version that can use plug-in charging, onboard charging when mobile and the ICE. However, what is it''s environmental credentials? So let us not forget what the CEO said about his peanut

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

There are some fundamental issues with both hydrogen and electricity if we are to use them in transport. 1), to liquify hydrogen users between 25 and 30% of the energy in the hydrogen itself, affecting the efficiency of the system . 2) how do you produce the hydrogen in the first place. If you use steam methane Reformation then the carbon footprint is sonme 28% worse than using diesel. If you produce hydrogen from renewable electricity then you need Copious amounts of pure water and large-scale renewable and nuclear electric generation. Currently the UK producers over 700 terrawatt hours of electricity but only just over 320 terrawatt hours is available at point of use the rest is lost during transmission and distribution (see Annex H DUKES). If the energy used in transport is translated into electrical energy Then we would need over 400 TW hours of additional electricity at point of use, in other words we would have to more than double the current electrical generation capability. Please look at the digest of UK energy statistics apoendix H for the details on the transmission losses for electricity. We haven t as a nation started to address the sheer amount of electricity we will need to fulfil the future aspirations and we know how long it takes to build a single nuclear power station let alone copious amounts. Meanwhile hydrogen fuel cells need precious metals which have to be mined and supplied In addition currently hydrogen fuel cell technology is over 10 times the price of an internal combustion engine and therefore the cost of the vehicles is going to be prohibitive for the vast majority of the worlds population to be able to afford. In addition the cost of batteries though reducing is still some five times the cost of an internal combustion engine and still has a long way to go before they are affordable as mass transit whilst maintaining the profitability that the manufacturers of vehicles will need. There is a long way to go before we achieve what we believe is achievable and it will require some pretty strong political will. Finally none of the above takes into account the loss of fuel duty from fossil feels that will need to be replaced by the new technologies, how will the government recover lost revenue at the same time as funding these future technologies when we can t afford to fund our A and E Departments.

City of London energy-efficient lighting plans to save ?500,000 a year

Of course we could just turn the lights off

Ikea joins Big Clean Switch to offer 100% renewable energy tariff

It is 07.45, demand on the Grid is 40.2GW; coal is at 5.73GW, gas at 21.5GW, nuclear at 7.5GW; AND WIND AT 0.66GW, A WHOLE 1.64% OF DEMAND. 100% renewable tariff and supply???, that''s the tariff, not the supply!!! Richard Phillips

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

The move to battery cars is not certain. The better alternative is a hydrogen fuel cell car. It is more efficient, more convenient and more easily integrated into our current infrastructure, does not have adverse social implications that battery cars do, will not require a massive expansion of our electricity grid, does not generate significant pollution through the mining of minerals for the batteries and does not depend on a commodity that is relatively rare and will be tradable and subject to markets being cornered by countries and individuals. A more balanced approach is required in reporting on this extremely important subject. The Japanese are planning to have tens of thousands of Hydrogen FC cars on the road by 2020. Please provide

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

If National Grid is planning the EV charging points, will they/ should they be treated as a supplier? Ofgem has stated that DSO/ DNO will not be allowed to supply and charge for energy from Energy Storage schemes

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

If National Grid is planning the EV charging points, will they/ should they be treated as a supplier? Ofgem has stated that DSO/ DNO will not be allowed to supply and charge for energy from Energy Storage schemes

Behaviour change - the key to energy efficiency - The Jade Advisory blog

Totally agree. If we can all reduce our energy demand by 10% that is equivalent of Hinkley C not needing to be built. While we seem to be pretty good at improving our energy efficiency at home, where the bills hit our wallets directly, we are woefully pathetic at saving energy everywhere else. Imagine if you got a bonus each year because the business saved X on the lecky bill just because you switched off your computer at night or turned the lights off at 5pm? That said we can all make massive differences with small changes to the way we manage electricity. Simple things like turning the thermostat down a degree on the Central Heating, switching lights off, avoiding standby mode. One of the big ones is turning down the thermostat on the hot water. Unless you have a tank you do not need to heat the hot water to more than 50C but most households have the tank thermostat at 65C or more. Not only a waste of heat but dangerous too.

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

Nobody talks about the cost of the electricity to the vehicle user who is going to pay for this investment. Electricity pays no fuel duty so how will the government replace lost revenue? Is appears to me that everybody assumes electricity price will either be free or very low clearly economic s would say otherwise

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

Great news. Difficult to see how motorway drivers who will, presumably, want to charge their vehicles not sell energy, can contribute to capacity though..... It is the short journey commuter/home worker, long term parker who will provide such capacity and those will need much more numerous rapid chargers dotted around our towns and cities, not out on motorways. Agree that the suggested charging currents are massive and that will need not only high-temperature cabling but also suitable on-board vehicle systems. F1 has presumably, learnt some tricks.....

'Important milestone': National Grid eyes up ultra-rapid motorway EV charging fleet

Again, no understanding of basic physics leads you to publish items with frothing enthusiasm without any consideration of simple practicality. 350kW rate of charging at, say, 500V (above the voltage of the battery being charged) implies a current of 700Amps. 700Amps not only requires huge cabling, it''s also highly dangerous to handle. Perhaps you should have one or two scientists on your payroll?

Glastonbury Festival to ban water bottles from 2019

Obviously eliminate, reuse at at the top of the list, but we now need to be pushing recycling, so it is great to see recycling paper cups in this article, if you are interested in further reading on recycling paper cups have a look at http://www.ace-uk.co.uk/media-centre/news/fourteen-organisations-sign-ground-breaking-agreement-with-ace-uk-to-boost-paper-cup-recycling/ Or if you want to set up instore recycling have a look at simplycups.co.uk It has never been easier to recycle papercups, if we have to use a disposable item, the least we can do is recycle it.

Report: Green businesses double performance of fossil fuel peers

Yep!!!! Its all about money, but not the provision of reasonably priced electricity ! Richard Phillips

UK is plugged in, as global car industry speeds away from fossil fuels - The CDP Blog

My current issue with Electric Vehicles (EV) is still range. I''m actually in the market for a new, small, car after a write off so I did look at the EV offerings. Living in the Highlands means you need the ability to drive a fair distance. The nearest "big" city is Inverness, 65 miles away and Glasgow is 107 miles. Even with rapid chargers (to 80%) these are still borderline getting there on a single charge with most small EVs. In winter in a Leaf I''d have to recharge at Tyndrum to reach Glasgow and that assumes a FULL charge not a rapid to 80%. I don''t want or need a big car but the only EVs with a suitable range (at present) are big SUV types. This includes most of the Plug in Hybrid EVs too. Until the kind of cars that many people want to drive are PHEV or EV, with at least a 200 mile REAL WORLD range and not theoretical (I mean in winter with the lights, heating, radio, windscreen wipers etc on) then they will remain an unviable option for those living in rural areas. With time and development I do see a day when {virtually} all vehicles on our roads will be zero or ultra low emission but don''t kill off the Internal Combustion Engine just yet. It''s flexibility, range and ultra rapid (ie a 55litre tank and 350-500mile range in 5 mins) refuelling plus its ability to supply on board electrical power and heat mean it still has a future.

Mine shaft energy storage and post-consumer packaging: the best green innovations of the week

Consuming power to Lift the weight during "lower" cost energy periods is based on the concept that there are hours in the day of lower energy usage. They are still there. However, the distribution use of charges costs at winter rates will be spread out further in every 24 hours, from April 18. With UOS costs reaching 60% of delivered energy cost, the renewable energy supply has to be on the load side of the lifting energy demand

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

The London Assembly report is quite wrong as the burning of such waste generates green electricity and heat for a capital city with an enormous appetite for these essentials - without using fossil fuels. Burning plastic waste takes that material out of circulation completely and eliminates any chance of it ending up in the ocean many recycling cycles later. Burning food waste is better than anaerobic digestion because you get the energy out of that waste without expensive AD plant and without the leftover digestate which still has to be disposed of after AD and there is limited potential for it to be used as fertiliser and it still requires transport to the site where the fertiliser is required, burning it provides useful electricity and heat and there is limited emission if the EfW plant exhaust is properly cleaned.

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

The London Assembly report is quite wrong as the burning of such waste generates green electricity and heat for a capital city with an enormous appetite for these essentials - without using fossil fuels. Burning plastic waste takes that material out of circulation completely and eliminates any chance of it ending up in the ocean many recycling cycles later. Burning food waste is better than anaerobic digestion because you get the energy out of that waste without expensive AD plant and without the leftover digestate which still has to be disposed of after AD and there is limited potential for it to be used as fertiliser and it still requires transport to the site where the fertiliser is required, burning it provides useful electricity and heat and there is limited emission if the EfW plant exhaust is properly cleaned.

Mine shaft energy storage and post-consumer packaging: the best green innovations of the week

Sometimes you read content wondering how much of it is - and I hate using this phrase - ''fake news''. I got that feeling reading about astronauts eating their own faeces (if it isn''t, it should be!) and ''gravitricty'' with no information about the mechanics of production.

Sustainable Business Covered podcast: Thames tours with Tideway

Ever looked out at the stern of the river ''buses''. The level of diesel smoke pollution is enormous when they accelerate between stops. Seems a bit strange to write a report on pollution from one of the most polluting forms of river transport.

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

Leonie Cooper needs to get a grip on reality. There is no alternative to W2E. Recycling only works if somebody somewhere has a commercially viable system to process recyclables. China doesn''t want our plastic. Mixed waste paper is 10 per tonne. How can the councils or private sector make that work? Without W2E, we will drown in un-recyclable plastics in the years to come.

BBC vows to 'lead the way' with single-use plastics ban by 2020

I am so encouraged by this action. I hope the government is also encouraged. Meanwhile, we are storing our single use plastics until we can find a way for them to be recycled: meat trays, fruit trays, margarine and yoghurt containers,, plastic wrapping, broken plant pots, bubble wrap, etc.

Top investors call on global food brands to make plant-based shift

Hi Haydn, The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that livestock systems account for 14.5% of total global GHG emissions from human activities. Thanks, George

Top investors call on global food brands to make plant-based shift

Could you please inform me of what source you are quoting Ghg livestock at 14:5% of total emissions Thank you Haydn evans

London, Barcelona or Singapore: Which will be the best smart city in the world?

It is good to see London amongst the leaders and making a big contribution.

Achieving a sustainable future is Mission Possible - Cranfield University Blog

Mission Possible is ambitious but achievable. If we all put a bit of effort, I am sure we can make it possible. Mariale, Thanks for sharing and inspiring. Best, Alberto

8 global sustainability trends to watch out for in 2018 - The Schneider Electric blog

This is highly valuable and informative blog for people who love sustainability and sustainability professionals.

8 global sustainability trends to watch out for in 2018 - The Schneider Electric blog

This is highly valuable and informative blog for people who love sustainability and sustainability professionals.

Plastics now a 'competitive issue' for business, CIWM chief warns

I wonder when all the noise quietens down, the papers move to the next emergency, whether anything will have changed ? I remember talking to a major coffee retailer last year, six months after the coffee cups scandal exploded. He admitted that beyond a few meetings to show the outside world they are attempting to do something, his business model had not changed at all. Nor had his chain lost one pound of sales. Indeed they continue to sell coffee in non recyclable cups. If we want things to stay as they are, things have to change or words to that effect from The Leopard.

Auto giants launch EV-sharing platform in China

Time for a car-sharing app in UK? Electric cars ideal, but not a prerequisite to get the system going.

How business can play a part in the new Northern Forest - The Creative Concern blog

The need for timber trees and professional management in new planting projects By Chris Yarrow Nowadays woodland management and silviculture often feature as after-thoughts in the case of new tree planting in Britain. Is this because the initiators are too engrossed in raising funds, getting consents and persuading politicians? Is it because, in these days of multi-purpose forestry, nobody is prepared to agree a suitable mix of benefits? Or is that no-one can guarantee funding to care for and administer the resulting woodlands? For the past four decades public debate about trees and woodlands has been dominated by environmental aspects, and commercial afforestation, especially of productive conifers, has dropped off markedly. It is easy to promote a simple message such as exotics bad; natives good , just as many were swayed by the message Make America great again. The implication of such simplistic slogans on British forestry is that timber production and planting the most appropriate trees for the site are lost in the clamour of thinking that we are saving the environment by simply increasing woodland cover. Work in established plantations has often overturned original long-term objectives by felling trees, irrespective of commercial or aesthetic merit, purely because they are considered to be alien. Under pressure from naturalist and other pressure groups, PAWS Restoration is now official policy. Very little communication with the public currently deals with woodland management, compared with, for example, coverage of tree-planting events. (Hemery, undated). Perhaps the multiplicity of forestry organisations in this country means that the profession and industry fail to come together to speak with one voice, and the well-funded environmental groups are better organised at influencing Government on matters of forest policy. As Roger Richardson argued last year, as a profession we tend to preach to the converted (Richardson, 2017) and we have only ourselves to blame if the public ignores us. Although tending trees for timber goes on for several decades, UK grants for tree-planting have far outweighed support for management, and we are all familiar with neglected plantations direly in need of thinning, pest control, or access for harvesting. It is no surprise, therefore, that over forty percent of English woods are neglected. Production of good timber is the result of long-term skilled application of good silviculture. With a lifetime s experience as a chartered forester I know only too well how under-appreciated are the skills of my profession compared with almost any other. Who among us has not seen inappropriate, or downright amateur prescriptions handed out by untrained advisers or those with another agenda? The recent announcement of the creation of a new Northern Forest will be welcomed by many. It is proposed to plant over a 25-year period 62,000 acres between Liverpool and Hull, incorporating five community forests, at a cost of 500 million, and starting in Bolton this March. Apparently, the project will be overseen by The Woodland Trust and the Community Forest Trust. The Government has pledged 5.7 million, but it is anticipated that most of the funding will come from charities. Among the stated objectives of landscape, conservation and flood control benefits, there is no mention of timber production. With eighty percent of our timber needs met by imports, should we not, post-Brexit, be looking to increase our self-sufficiency in any new large-scale afforestation? I do not argue that timber production is always a profitable venture, but its inclusion of a nurse crop in a multiple-use management regime can assist establishment, as well as offset early costs. This will be especially true in planting up often-inhospitable Pennine sites, and Britain s foresters can claim unparalleled expertise in this field. The increasing demand for biofuel and plastic substitutes is reason alone to include exposure-tolerant conifer nurse species. By doing so a whole raft of benefits would accrue, not least of which would be better-formed broadleaves, if these are the long-term objective. On suitable locations a catch-crop of Christmas trees can offset establishment costs, as well as provide an attraction for visits and associated purchases, activities and the like. At Wilderness Wood we sold some 2,500 trees each Christmas, and our source for a number of years was an area we re-established after the 1987 Great Storm (Yarrow, 2015). I do not posit that our 63-acre venture would be applicable to all conditions, but elements of its management would fit into some areas within easy access to population centres. The source of plants is of considerable concern if we wish to obtain useable timber. The Forestry Commission set up Registered Seed Stands many years ago complemented by the BIHIP in 1991, rebranded as the Future Trees Trust, in order to improve planting stock of trees planted in the UK. Who of us has not had to inspect or manage a stand where the seed source must have been sweepings off a road or a parkland tree? One such 1960 stand in Wilderness Wood had beech so badly forked there was hardly a tree worth retaining, and in the interests of good silviculture, the stand became principally the pine with which it had been planted (Yarrow, op. cit.). Let us hope that, among the laudable aims of genetic diversity and local provenance, tree form is now to be given adequate status. It seems inconceivable that bodies, including Natural Resources Wales under its Acorns Antics programme, are encouraging schoolchildren to collect mast for replanting local forests and woodlands, irrespective of tree quality. (Natural Resources Wales, 2017). Would any farmer let a runt ram loose in his herd of prize ewes just because it was local? No reasonable person can suggest that timber trees of good form are in any way incompatible with all the other benefits that a multiple-use wood can offer, unless they crave impenetrable thickets of overgrown scrub. Sadly, there is no shortage of such woods for them to seek out and enjoy from the edges! Surely it is time that groups such as Woodland Heritage and Future Trees Trust were actively involved in the planning stages of all new planting initiatives of any size. In this way our successors will have worthwhile trees, as well as a protected landscape. Refs. HEMERY, G.(Undated) Reviving a wood culture in the UK In: The State of the UK s Forests, Woods and Trees, Woodland Trust. NATURAL RESOURCES WALES (Newsletter, 28/11/2017) Acorn Antics Achievement RICHARDSON, R. (2017) Future success? Woodland Heritage YARROW, C. (2015) Thirty Years in Wilderness Wood. Troubador The above will be published in this year''s Woodland Heritage magazine. Let me know if you would like an amended version. Chris Yarrow.

Transport becomes nation's biggest polluter as UK emissions drop 5%

Why won''t the government implement a 2p/litre charge on motor fuel? It would raise a huge amount for the NHS etc, and drivers would hardly notice, as this would be well within local variations of fuel prices at the pumps. Also, why do they not subsidise the formation of a national car-share scheme, which could be managed on an Uber style basis? Anyone up for starting such a scheme?

Transport becomes nation's biggest polluter as UK emissions drop 5%

Why won''t the government implement a 2p/litre charge on motor fuel? It would raise a huge amount for the NHS etc, and drivers would hardly notice, as this would be well within local variations of fuel prices at the pumps. Also, why do they not subsidise the formation of a national car-share scheme, which could be managed on an Uber style basis? Anyone up for starting such a scheme?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

I also wish to know who is going to validate this material ? There is only currently one standard that certifies biodegradable packaging and this is the EN13432 on compostability. Will Polymateria request certification under this standard ? If not, what validation are they suggesting ?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

I wish to know also whether this is an oxo degradable plastic. The EU announced its intention to restrict the use of such materials in their communication of January 16th 2018. If this is not plastic with an additive, then what is it ?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

Tesla uses a lot of plastics and material mixes that effectively prevent recycling. Not a great comparison. If Dunne means he''s putting his money where his mouth is then the billions of investment in UK recycling industry and new technologies would be good to hear about. Walk the walk.

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

@Dan - one big issue with glass is weight. I''m all for aluminium though as it will help secure the local jobs at the aluminium foundry here in Fort William. Plastic is perfect for many packaging uses because it is inert, clear, flexible and lightweight. There is nothing intrinsically wrong with plastic just the way we all abuse it by throwing it away recklessly

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

lets just get back to glass packaging and aluminium and forget plastic

British universities show commitment to 'safeguard the climate'

Note that it is ; The University for the Creative Arts (UCA). not The University for the Creative Sciences. . The key is relevant knowledge. Richard Phillips

Circular economy takes centre stage at Davos

The plastic filth keeps circling our lives. Clean conceptional intentions are paramount to designing out & stronger minds required to stop/remove the residual stockpiles. The most dependent & worst new use of plastic is Amazon Go concept.

Plastics now a 'competitive issue' for business, CIWM chief warns

Find some opinions who where for weeks "most read" in Flanders. One is translated in English, others will follow. https://www.mo.be/en/opinion/plastic-poison-and-thats-that https://www.mo.be/opinie/belgi-recyclagekampioen-een-geruststellende-leugen-ontmaskerd

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

What a pity that Mr Dunne didnt check out the science first. The EU , Defra, Loughborough University, Ellen Macarthur Foundation, The Association of Plastics Recyclers and others have all condemned oxo-fragmentable additives and approaches as being damaging to the environment. He should look at the time scales, the actual pathway of these products and the destination of the millions of micro plastic particles created by this technology into the eco-system and the impact on long term circular economy recycling. Then he might reconsider that he will become the "Trump of Plastics" not letting "fake science" get in the way of sales to well meaning customer who all want the problem to "go away". Its not too late to do a little reading and reconsider hopping on to the wrong slippery slide to reality which will eventually come.

We have a problem and a lot of plastics - The Carbon Smart blog

Why no mention of using mixed plastic waste to make sustainable heavy-duty composite products in place of tropical hardwood, creosote treated softwood and concrete. Don''t cost any more and provide far longer maintenance free service lives, offering exceptional whole life performance allied to their recyclability. Rod Fox - Revaluetech ltd.

Triodos launches UK's 'most sustainable' personal current account

Do they allow Bitcoin Transactions?

Triodos launches UK's 'most sustainable' personal current account

Do they allow Bitcoin Transactions?

Capacity Market Auction: 'Bizarre' Government policies blocking renewables funding

Unless renewables are supported by energy storage they are far more appropriate for base-load than for top-up. I don''t suppose there were many renewables bids in this auction. Let''s just rejoice that renewables now form a major element of our base load generation

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

Perhaps a totally new way of looking at plastic, how we use it and how we abuse it is what is needed. Tesla shook up the car world with its innovative approach to motoring so I wish Polymateria success doing the same to plastics.

Plastic bag charge: 10 fascinating facts about the scheme's sustainability success

The current government speak of 9 billion fewer plastic bags being used without speaking of minimizing production. At the risk of dependence on taxation as the main tool at regulating consumption, we risk losing the opportunity to reduce pollutant packaging waste further by not giving equal weight to public education and business regulation. If we really want a circular, sustainable economy, we may also have to learn to do without products and processes that pollute.If we hadn''t used them in the first place, the problems with non bio degradable products would be minimized. What''s wrong with a return to paper carriers, like we used to have in the UK at grocers shops, at least they have the potential to be sustainable produced and are bio degradable. Minimizing the use of packing materials and their toxicity is surely part of the solution to reducing environmental pollution that affects us all. Education of the production cycle and the effects of pollutant waste packaging is another important part of the question of how to reduce waste.Without the will at personal and political level, the statements of intent for improving the production of renewables and cleanup of existing pollutants, will mean little relative to the scale of the problem. By consuming smarter and minimizing packaging the future issue of disposal is already minimized. Companies like blue17 vintage and others, such as thrift stores in the retail recycling industry have been doing the above for years by offering reused clothing and packaging, including using plastic carrier bags instead of new and incentivizing customers to bring their own bags. Patagonia is a pioneer of using recycled fabrics in it''s garment manufacturing.If a well known brand such as this can adapt and prosper, why not others. It''s excellent that the companies above, in this article do what they do to minimize production and consumption of pollutants, but so much more is needed from everyone who produces and consumes, as it starts with us.

Mustard jet fuel and edible beer packaging: the best green innovations of the week

but how environmentally friendly are biofuels for aircraft, if we have to divert 1,000''s of hecteres of food production to make it?

Aldi pledges to halve food waste by 2030

50% in 12 years, perhaps no waste by mid century. Wonder why Aldi customers support such inefficiency through present pricing arrangements.

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

After several weeks of researching, head scratching and puzzling through various building regulations, protocols, systems and gizmos I have come to a conclusion about my upgrade to smart heating control. I''m going for the Honeywell EvoHome Connect system. This is by far and away the simplest, but also the most logical and therefore powerful, system. Not only that but it is tried and tested being on version 3.0 compared to some of the other systems which are still very much Beta. The beauty of the EvoHome is it is designed and built to control your heating (and hot water). Nothing fancy no over complications just does exactly what it says on the tin. It even gets rid of the stupid hall thermostat and controls the heating based on the demand from every room in the house (well up to 12 zones where a zone can be more than 1 room). I will update once it is installed and we''ve got it running then keep you advised on how it works and how much it is saving us in terms of energy.

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

David, that is true but that said it might still be a viable option that enables much more storage capacity and smoothing of supplies. And it''s not exactly difficult to operate a timer switch :-)

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

Hi Keiron, I think there is a problem with off peak electric prices which could be changed: I understand that at present the low off-peak rates are paid for by higher rates (than standard) for other times, so the supplier doesn''t lose if you don''t make the effort to time when your energy hungry equipment is switched on, which is a lot of hassle and probably why most people don''t bother. Since the name of the game at the moment is to encourage users to balance the consumption throughout 24 hours, these tariffs need to change.

From environmental expert to CEO: E.ON boss Michael Lewis reflects on his remarkable sustainability

Some serious work to do on the customer experience front from experience.

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

@David - that''s actually a pretty good suggestion. I''m like you in that I don''t see how solar panels on my house in Fort William can ever produce enough electricity to keep a battery topped up let alone charge it from flat to full in a day. It simply isn''t sunny enough here (250+ days rain a year). As the Highlands produces far more electricity than it needs from Hydro and Wind it is a bit of a no-brainer to offer us the option of charging a battery during the night to reduce load during the day. That said there is already the Economy 7 and Economy 10 tariffs which you could use to charge up a battery but would this be an economical option?

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

A great idea coupling domestic PV (and wind) electricity to a battery storage system; a no-brainer to save power during the day to use at night, however for those of us who cannot afford, or like me, not allowed to install PV on my roof because I am in a conservation area, another idea would be to allow consumers to charge their battery with off-peak electricity (usually 8 hours at night) to use it during the day, without the need for PV.

Co-op goes plastic free for own-brand teabags

In response to Mark Woodward, it would seem probable that the tiny amount of bioplastic needed to seal a teabag could biodegrade in a home composter - which is the best place for a teabag to end up - but this is indeed not clear from the article. As for cornstarch being a "virtuous" resource, in fact a lot of pesticides, mineral fertiliser and water are generally used to grow maize, unless it''s organic.

Water firms back national scheme to cut plastic bottle use

Having just returned from a trip to Venice, I found no opportunity to refill my water bottle at either Gatwick or Marco Polo airports. As one is unallowed to take liquids past the security control I wonder whether this is a ploy to make passengers purchase expensive bottles of water, just as they have to process past an interminable array of shops, in the expectation that such arrangements will contribute to airport profits.

Nissan sheds light on 'world first' vehicle-to-grid project

This is an excellent idea but I wonder how the Grid is going to handle the possibility of hundreds of vehicles all discharging into the Grid at the same time. Surely this will break the G83 limit of 16 Amps per phase. The only solution I can think of is the G83 connection system from Clean Power Solutions that allows any amount of generation or storage to be connected to the Grid as a G83 connection. It has been seen by all of the DNO''s and they have agreed that it is a G83 connection even if there is 100 kW behind the meter

Heathrow launches Sustainable Innovation Prize to assist expansion aims

Sorry for the pernickety comment, but the plural of ''aircraft'' is ''aircraft'' - no ''s'' at the end!

Co-op goes plastic free for own-brand teabags

It is fantastic that companies are thinking about this, but we have to be careful, bioplastics will only make a difference in industrial composting, it will not break down in home composting. BioPlastics could be defined as hard-to-recycle plastics as very few end-users would have access to industrial composting. Landfill sites are designed so nothing breaks down in them. The great benefit to BioPlastics is that are from a renewable resource like cornstarch

Plastics: We're at war with the symptoms, not the cause - Matt Mace's blog

Agree!

Introducing the Climate Coaching Blog Series - The Jade Advisory blog

Good initiative !!

The Environment Agency launches new water quality testing service

Water runs off from up stream fields above my land that lead to a leat that flows to the local estuary, where there are water sports, many birds and other wildlife. At times, due to the drainage, or lack of it, the runoff from these fields reaches stream-like levels. My concern is that this water, and what it carries through the embodied silt, is foul smelling and I am always careful to wear latex gloves when handling anything brought down with this water. The smell seems to be like that of animal slurry and nitrates. Moreover, I keep domestic wildfowl who are exposed to the foul water. Question: how could I ensure that this runoff water is tested?

Transparent solar cells and hydrogen bikes: the best green innovations of the week

Transparent Solar Panels could have a major impact on our energy generation capacity. Just image the Shard covered in them? That''s a huge surface area generating power, even if it is only a few watts per window. Do this on all the major skyscrapers in London and suddenly we are talking megawatts. And the best thing? Practically invisible. Even the power infrastructure to distribute it is invisible as it is already there. No need to build 100m high transmission pylons across the country. The only problem is still the fact solar doesn''t do squat at night and very little when it''s overcast, foggy or raining but I still think transparent solar panels are a no brainer and should be being installed as standard on all tower blocks and skyscrapers

What does the future role look like for the sustainability manager?

Good conference, that said, I am not sure how sustainability functions like energy management, waste management, climate change risk and opportunity analysis and some compliance requirements of sustainability (ESOS, EU ETS, CRC, Waste Packaging Reporting Obligation etc.) can be managed by a non sustainability expert. Empowering team to deliver supporting approaches for effective sustainability will not deliver lasting value for businesses if sustainability leadership is lacking. Like many other areas of businesses, health & safety & finance aware/empowered employees does not equate to lack of leaderships in the areas. It is important for companies to identify the purpose of sustainability to their brand and explore it to deliver year on year tangible value to the business.

Businesses accelerate progress towards 100% renewables

I do wonder whether if, at any one moment, the power being consumed by the organisations committed to 100% renewable energy (electricity), is less than the power being generated by renewable sources. As well as these organisations, there are many private consumers who pay to utilise only "renewable" power. During those times when atmospheric conditions make it possible only to generate small amounts of power, and storage is exhausted, reliance has to be placed on fossil or nuclear backup; the reliable sources. Is close account taken of these matters? The organisation seems to be more one concerned with administration than electrical engineering, and, I suspect, based more upon profitable business interests than environmental concern Richard Phillips

Keele University launches Europe's first at-scale smart energy living laboratory

@ Roger - indeed the adage "if it ain''t broke don''t fix it" comes in to the equation. If, like Richard, your system works and does what you need it too there is little need to "upgrade". If like me however you have a defective Master Thermostat and your heating system isn''t set up to work at optimal for your needs then the investment in a "smart" system is justified and could pay back in only a few years.

Keele University launches Europe's first at-scale smart energy living laboratory

Richard, Dont be daunted. The cost of these controls has fallen and I expect you have already gone through a couple of technology installs like setting up your router. You dont have to do it everyday and once it is done its done. Every little helps and you may already be in the situation where you have a short return.

Jaguar Land Rover cuts UK production amid Brexit and diesel uncertainty

If they don''t embrace EV they should seriously consider shutting down! The Automotive industry''s inept market predictions and reliance upon Gov. intervention to survive is being exposed by their failure to keep up with the Chinese, Japanese/US and Koreans particularly in solid state battery development technology. Dyson will be the next big UK based player in this market........

Plastics: We're at war with the symptoms, not the cause - Matt Mace's blog

A great article. But confused between wanting to reduce plastics, but then talks about paper cups, the latte levy is a smoke screen for the real issue, a cordinated recycling scheme across the country, so we can have national advertising campaigns to increase recycling rates, 2025 is far too long to wait for this to happen. Obviously if we can make PRN S more successful like in France it will help the situation.

Keele University launches Europe's first at-scale smart energy living laboratory

@Richard - indeed the "wax-stat" TRV does a great job but it is a very basic job. You set it to a desired temperature, say III (which is about 21C according to Mistral) and that is the temperature you will get in your room. All the time regardless of how your room is used. With a programmable TRV you can set it to be warmer when you use the room, say 21C in the evening in the living room, but cooler otherwise, say 18C in the living room during the day. If the boiler is not having to supply heat to rooms it doesn''t need to you burn less fuel. Then there is the "dumb" master thermostat in the hall. How many people end up having that set to 25C just to make sure the rest of the house is warm but the boiler is running trying to heat a cold hall to sub tropical temperatures? Add in hot water control so you only have to heat the tank (if fitted) to 55C most days but once a week up it to 62C for legionella control and you can save more fuel. Many HW tanks are set far too hot wasting fuel and potentially leading to injury from scalding. A smart heating system, or should we say a programmable heating system, gives the user much more control over their heating requirements so by fine tuning when and where heat is needed less fuel is wasted. For many smaller homes yes this could be hammer and walnut but for larger homes, offices, guesthouses etc smart could be a big energy (and money) saver

Keele University launches Europe's first at-scale smart energy living laboratory

This does seem to have something about it of the use of a sledge hammer to kill a gnat. I have thermostat valves, the "wax-stat" on every water radiator in the house, and a gas fired heater (boiler, which never boils, trouble if it does). It works well. I am driven to consider these complex "smart" systems as good examples of diminishing returns. Richard Phillips

Report: 25,000 charging points needed across UK by 2030 to match EV demand

"Meanwhile, charging facilities which draw on 100% renewable energy from street lamp posts are set to be placed on the streets of Kensington and Chelsea..." 100% renewable; how is this statement to be verified? And in Chelsea, a dense urban area, Who issues this nonsense????? Richard Phillips

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

@Philip - Doubt it as she''s screwed us over every which way so far :-) On a more practical note I''d love to know how many nanowatts of solar were produced from all the panels in Scotland today. Here in Lochaber and along the Great Glen to Inverness it has been ghastly. Heavy rain, totally overcast, blowing a hoolie (probably too much wind for the turbines as well!!). I doubt there has been any sunlight at all all day. The fact we have had the house lights on all day and our security light came on at lunchtime give some indication of how dark it has been today.

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

Nissan Cars and Ikea are doing what the big six electricity generators should have done - invest in domestic renewable technology. For those in Scotland I am sure that Nicola Sturgeon will solve the weather problem for you.

Welsh coal mine set for geothermal transformation following ?9.4m fund

Very interesting development and a great idea. Hope it comes off as this could open the way to access heat for other areas of Britain from disused cola mines and provide employment opportunities in these areas too. However the irony of this EU funding is not lost on me as didn''t South Wales vote Leave?

Greenpeace: New Coca-Cola global plastics plan 'dodges the main issue'

Just a thought - Recycle all drink bottles, the materials used must surely be easily sorted, and recycled. Make it an offence for dumping same. The residual hotch-potch of materials, a sorting nightmare, burn, really properly for energy generation. electricity taken by the grid , as generated. Just as is the case for wind turbines, but avoiding intermittency Richard Phillips

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

Another couple of good questions: How big is the system? Both generating capacity (Max and Real World) and the storage battery. How long will the battery provide usable power for and at what rate? As an example my domestic power demand averages out at 8kw-hr per day. If 1kw-hr per day is 44w per hour for 24hrs then 8kw-hr per day is 352watts per hour continuously. Obviously there are peaks when the hob is on or the dishwasher and troughs when there''s not much on overnight. The hob, for instance, if all 5 rings are on full can draw 7kw (32amps). Can this battery system provide this kind of power? Can it give me more than a few hours of power? Can the panels charge the battery in a winter''s day in the Highlands (ie less than 6hrs of sunlight if we are lucky)?

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

" allows users to control their energy use in real-time! The first item. I already do this, I switch on when power is required, and switch off when power is not required, All in real time. This sounds like another nonsense statement, rather like the rubbish used to advertise smart meters. Richard Phillips

Competing cup claims: Fact or fiction? - The Simply Cups blog

Peter, many thanks for this article, I think it will clarify a lot of people s minds, in recent weeks it has become apparent that a lot of the general public think that by demanding a Compostable cup, they have negated All environmental responsibility, but as you have show, it is not what it is made out of, it is what happens next, and now with two huge channels for recycling there is no excuse Simply cups supporting instore recycling, and Ace Sonneco supporting collection through councils, it has never been easier to recycle paper cups.

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

The cost of the storage systems need to be lowered as the complete supply and installation cost of 4kW domestic solar array has dropped to 4K i.e 1K/kW. The cost of the storage is same as the solar array and definitely needs to come down so that the payback period reduces a lot better. This should increase considerably the sales of domestic solar array with a storage solution.

Nissan unveils energy storage and solar solution for UK homes

This is fine on the south coast, and in fact should be encouraged down there where there is ample sunshine and a dearth of other "renewables" (with the exception of the Thames Array). However how effective is this going to be in the real world wet conditions up in the Highlands? Solar panels don''t do jack when it is pouring with rain, overcast or dark (or covered in snow as they have been this week) and during the winter it is quite common not to see sunlight for days or even weeks on end. How is your battery storage going to work if there are no amps going into it?

Are we a step closer to achieving the 'green hydrogen economy'?

Since the intermittent generation of electricity by any renewable source is a source of problems with the national grid, it might be a good idea, eventually, to take all renewable sources from the grid, and use them for hydrogen generation. Quantitative balance has to be correct, of course! Replacement generation would of course be nuclear. Richard Phillips

Housebuilders 'cheating the public' over energy efficiency standards, claims Lord Deben

If a conventional house costs 100k to build a passiv one will cost 125k. Average house uses about 20000 kwhr gas and 5000 kwhr elec. Current cost if you shop around about 1400 pa. If the passive house halves this cost (and it probably will not due to the human element) it will take 35 years to reach break even on the passive house. An extra 25k might be chicken feed to Gummer but for most people this is a deal breaker.

Evian aims for 100% recycled plastic bottles by 2025

Recycleable bottles already exist. They are called glass. Creating a different type of plastic will do nothing to address the environmental problems. 1 tax per bottle is the only thing that will.

The 25 Year Environment Plan: reasons to look on the bright side - The BITC blog

I would like to know how long we will have to wait for a cordinated recycling scheme across the country, a lot about what business has to do, but little about what the government is going to do. Uk is way down the table for recycling, with Germany at number 1, how have they achieved that?