Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Michael Gove backs comprehensive 'all-in' deposit return system for plastics

Again, one of the great problems of our governmental system is that we are living an increasingly science dominated society, but the government is pretty well devoid of scientific knowledge, and of the even the basics which would allow it to take scientific advice. The easily recognised and universal polythene milk bottle is easily kept separate and reprocessed. So is the transparent polyethylene terephthalate drinks bottle. Nearly all other domestic plastics are so complex a mix that separation is not to be contemplated. Burn all this is custom built power stations. But this is a national enterprise, and disposal is in dozens of private hands which must all be required to act together as one system, or be bribed. What do you think?? Richard Phillips

Michael Gove backs comprehensive 'all-in' deposit return system for plastics

"All or nothing" springs to mind. Either instigate a Deposit/Return system for every type of container or don''t bother at all. However the emphasis should not be just on recycling. As Hugh showed on TV recycling makes no difference when the waste just gets shipped somewhere else and burnt. The emphasis should be on reducing unnecessary packaging and waste in the first place, reusing packaging where possible/feasible or available (Why can''t we clean, sterilise and reuse plastic 1litre milk bottles for instance?), repurposing (can we use Mr Morrison''s very nice plastic fruit juice bottles for other things - like storing rice or dried pulses in?) with recycling being the last resort once items can not be reused anymore. PET Bottles, used for soft drinks, can be made into fleece jackets, jeans and a number of other products but why can''t the bottles be returned, cleaned and reused several times before being sent to be recycled? Lastly any D/R scheme has got to be workable. The supermarkets have got to be onboard to take these items back when we come in to do our weekly shop. The local store (Co-op/Tesco Metro/Arkwright''s) has got to be onboard and assisted if necessary to make it work. It should become second nature to clean our containers/packaging/bottles/cans etc and drop them in the "returns" bag to take them to the shop next time rather than just throw them in the bin.

JLR, VW & Ford accelerate electric vehicle development

And the power to drive them will come from........where??? Do tell Richard Phillips

Michael Gove backs comprehensive 'all-in' deposit return system for plastics

"while also warning that time is running out to avert the climate emergency" I wonder where the scientific knowledge comes from which enables Mr Gove, an English graduate, to draw his conclusions. And where did this "emergency" come from. Rather like a rabbit out of the hat! There is no "emergency", but there is a very considerable need for those making decisions upon energy policy matters to understand the physical basis upon which those decisions are made. It could be noted that a considerable number of leading academics from the Universities of both Italy and Brazil, have written long technical letters to their Governments, rejecting the thesis that CO2 is responsible for the global temperature increases over past decades. All is accounted for by natural phenomena. Notable also is the finding by official US government Attorneys, that the statement that 97% of scientists support the concept of anthropogenic Global warming, has no basis. The statement is totally rejected. Use of the media for the propagation of dubious information was well developed in 1930s Germany. Propaganda in fact, and the public lapped it up!!!! Richard Phillips .

UK Government provides ?250m climate aid package for Africa

This is peanuts compared with how much the Conservative Government are giving our hard earned taxes to building fossil fuel power stations in the Third World. We must have prosecutions for this criminal act, our money is supposed to be spent on improving life, not ending it.

Extinction Rebellion protests block traffic in five UK cities

I can understand their concerns - and I share them. However disruption has its own climate cost and I''m especially concerned if they have , in the current weather conditions, young children who may not have enough protection from the heat. Please protect yourselves and your families from immediate harm, we still have some time to prevent disaster globally - some -not a lot- but some

Coca-Cola and Merlin Entertainments extend on-the-go plastic recycling initiative

Method for Disposing of Single Use Plastic Found The ''Daily Mail'' 11 July 2019 reports that single use plastic can now be turned into electricity and hydrogen, both important in a near-zero CO2 economy, it can be used on dirty or mixed plastic, and leaves no residue. The University of Chester, in partnership with PowerHouse Energy, has come up with the process and Waste2Tricity is the exclusive developer in the UK and South East Asia. They intend to stop plastic being dumped in rivers and oceans by making it valuable, paying $50 a tonne to be put in their kilns. The process includes cutting the plastic into 5cm strips, the air is squeezed out, and heating it in a kiln at 1,000 degrees Centigrade which instantly melts and gasifies it. This syngas (synthetic gas similar to natural gas) has very low CO2 content and goes into a pressure swing absorption (PSA) which extracts hydrogen at two tonnes a day. The remainder of the gas is used to generate electricity in a gas engine. It is hoped that the patented technology will soon power the plant at Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, 7,000 houses on the grid in a day, and 7,000 hydrogen cars in two weeks. As excess energy from solar and wind turbines will have to be stored for peak use and for night time use, hydrogen is an instant way of providing such energy on demand, and the more the better. PowerHouse Energy say they have received a letter of support from the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade & Industry about their DMG technology, which is the thermal conversion of carbonaceous organic materials, which is converting complex molecules into simple, safe, molecules. In the letter the Japanese Government Ministry said it considers the DMG technology has many environmental advantages, and views it as a major competitor within the low-cost production of hydrogen industry. Professor Joe Howe, Executive Director of Thornton Energy Research Institute at the University of Chester said: We are extremely excited to be hosting the prototype demonstrator here at the University of Chester. The technology converts all plastic waste into high quality, low carbon hydrogen syngas which can then be used to power gas engines. A by-product of this process is electricity, meaning waste plastic can not only fuel cars but can also keep the lights on at home. Surely the world must wake up to this technology. It will make waste plastic valuable with it being able to power the world''s towns and cities, and most importantly, it can help clean up our oceans of waste plastic now.

Citizens Advice: Government lacking 'credible' plan to decarbonise heat

All very interesting but the key precursor to any discussion on heat supply should be heat demand. Where are the methods, incentives and targets to significantly reduce heat demand, particularly for the existing housing stock?

How sustainable is Wimbledon 2019?

Almost any event that attracts large numbers of the public will have a larger carbon footprint than if those same members of the public stayed at home and watched it on TV. However, event managers can - and must - make sure that food & goods they sell have a lower impact than if all those TV-watchers consumed similar produce (so should ensure efficient cooking of pizzas and locally sourced strawberries as far as possible in SW19). Avoiding idling is a small step, but if it leads to behaviour change by taxi drivers elsewhere, may have a larger impact. In the end, there''s always a narrow line between genuinely trying to do the right thing and greenwash. It''s interesting that the article doesn''t mention BS ISO 20121 "sustainable events management" which might have helped Wimbledon out.

Citizens Advice: Government lacking 'credible' plan to decarbonise heat

Heat networks sound great and in principle if installed in new build developments can be very effective ways of heating as long as the homes they are supplying are built to the Platinum standard of energy efficiency and insulation and not the brass standard currently aimed for (and often missed). There''s a new 400 home development alongside a new hospital and STEM centre near me. An ideal opportunity to put in a district Ground Source Heat Pump and Water Source Heat Pump (Loch Linnhe is less than a mile away with copious amounts of Gulf Stream heat to use) but the houses are going to be built to the bare minimal standard and there''s no talk of district heating. Wasted opportunities meaning householders will probably be faced with large upgrade bills in the future. Then there is the question of how do we decarbonise the existing housing stock? I''ve looked into alternatives to my oil fired heating (A rated condensing boiler before anyone screams) and frankly it is out of reach financially. I''m looking at in excess of 10,000 so until my boiler packs in I''m not even going to think about it. To install an Air Source or Ground Source system I need to replace all the piping and radiators or try to install underfloor heating. Then there is the question of heating the 300litre hot water tank. I could simply switch the electric immersion on but that will take twice as long and cost nearly 4 times as much (not to mention where does the electricity come from - in my case renewably sourced and probably hydro electric given I live in the Highlands). I''m not prepared to freeze in winter as the "warm and fuzzy" feeling isn''t going to be enough to heat my home so until there is a proper system in place to help ALL households decarbonise (not just those on benefits) I will continue to buy my oil from a company that plants a tree for every 1000 litres purchased to offset at least some of the emissions.

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Dominic, the Forcing Effect is used by both the IPCC and the Met Office to explain the effect of CO2. It is postulated that a small effect in the heat generated from CO2, evaporates more water which has a large effect. When examined in a little more detail it begins to fall to pieces. Richard Phillips

National Grid: Electric cars could form battery hubs to store renewable energy

First this assume we will have 35 million EVs, 2nd that they will all be plugged in when not in use and 3rd that owners will be happy to let the grid take the power from the vehicle in the first place. The last is like saying to Tesco that they can borrow the petrol from your tank while you do the groceries as long as they promise to refill it when you need it. And that AIN''T going to happen. Come on really? Would anyone be happy to allow their car''s range to be reduced while it sits in the drive? What happens if there is some urgent need to drive and your battery is sitting at half or less because the grid needs power? Are you really going to sit there waiting for an hour or more to charge up? A totally unpracticable idea that should be buried in the compost heap of good intentions and recycled as plant food

Scottish Power boss: Onshore wind and energy storage policy key to net-zero transition

50MW of battery storage? Is that all, that will last about an hour if we are lucky. The only realistic grid scale energy storage is Pumped Storage Hydro but there''s no desire to invest in that or even upgrade existing hydro schemes such as Inverewe. We need GWs of storage to cover the prolonged periods when wind doesn''t blow, at night and when it is foggy (so there''s no solar input either). Hydro storage will last generations whereas batteries will maybe last a decade before they need replacing. What about investing in tidal stream generation as well as just putting more and more bloody wind turbines everywhere. A tidal turbine or a river flow turbine can sit and churn away producing reliable power all day everyday and doesn''t impact the visual environment. How about redeveloping Longannet power station into the UK''s first grid scale cryogenic or compressed air storage station? Infrastructure is already in place and it is an area desperate for new development. There''s space and a ready supply of water to use as a both an electrical and heat source from the tidal Forth. Time to start thinking outside the wind/chemical battery box. Open your eyes to every technology, invest in some radical R&D and come up with something new instead of trotting out the same, flawed, stuff all the time. Be bold.

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

No, Andy, disagree absolutely! The biggest renewable is wind. Since the 19th of last month, the 20+GW of wind power has suffered periods of 4.5, 6, and 6 days when the generation did not rise above 5Gw and was at or below 1GW for some 3.5 days. This is not untypical. A source as unreliable as that is only a liability; it has to have an equal back-up on tap, gas generation. Because this is an uneconomic way to run gas generation, it has to be subsidised!!! It is all in private hands , don''t forget. Solar is no better, nor are tidal lagoons, wave power is hopeless. Hydro, is now about at its maximum, little more there. Put your 10.5 billion into nuclear, this can work for weeks on end at near full design power if need be. In the 1962/3 winter, it was at 98.5% of design power for some 5-6 weeks when the UK temperature never went above zero, and coal was arriving at the power stations full of ice, not good news. I remember it very well, a new Dad, in a prefab, on top of the Berkshire downs! Renewables--- Bah- Humbug!!!! Richard Phillips

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Coal subsidies in the UK are 10.5 billion a year, we should be spending it all on renewables.

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

"how CO2, at about one fiftieth of concentration of the principal greenhouse gas, water vapour, manages to punch so much above it weight, hugely above??" Well it doesn''t, others such as methane are even higher per part and together contribute as much as CO2 so it''s hardly hugely ''above its weight'', just we use CO2 equivalent as the measurement as it is the largest single contributor due to larger amounts of that than others... http://scrippsscholars.ucsd.edu/vramanathan/content/trace-gas-greenhouse-effect-and-global-warming-underlying-principles-and-outstanding-issues-

E.ON now supplying all customers with 100% renewable electricity

Interesting as a month ago when I was looking for a new deal, and E.On were my supplier, their tariff would only give you renewable electricity if you paid an extra 2 a month. Needless to say I switched to a smaller, independent supplier who offered 100% renewable at no extra cost and saved me over 100 a year.

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Yes, Nick, theatre. Ordinary people can do little or nothing, we just have to put up with the great body politic "fighting climate change", now apparently an "emergency". A totally unexplained emergency, but that is because Green body politic understands little, but shouts ever louder!!! Now Ken. We are not yet at double pre industrial levels, which I understand to have been 280ppm, and we are now at about 415ppm. we have some way to go. The IPCC favour a figure of 3 degrees as the result of doubling. Note "favour", no proof, just preference. This figure is the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity. Measurement of its value from historical data, ie in the recent past, indicates a value of about 1.4 degrees. The "heat in the atmosphere is measured by its temperature, there is no hidden heat. There has been little if any increase in global temperature during the last two decades. Richard Phillips

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Nice theatre - so what do ordinary people need to do?

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Granted, water vapour is a more powerful greenhouse gas that Carbon dioxide and is a greater component of the atmosphere. That said, it is part of a cycle which is currently in reasonable balance, although ocean warming is increasing evaporation and that can be part of the reason for more violent storms -though I don''t have exact figures. In the case of CO2 we are now at double the pre-industrial CO2 content of the atmosphere, and the research of well over a century ago concluded that a doubling of atmospheric CO2 content would lead to an increase in average global temperature of 2deg Celsius. that''s where we''re heading. We''ve added huge amounts since Al Gore presented "An Inconvenient Truth" and the increase doesn''t seem to be slowing down world-wide. If, as also seems to be happening, there is enough extra heat in the atmosphere, melting of permafrost can lead to ground emissions of methane, 20 times more powerful than CO2. The key is not just "How much is there?" but "How sensitive is the system?"

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Sir David Attenborough: 'Radical' battle against climate change can be a 'huge opportunity'

Throughout the report, there is not a single mention of just how, if we abandon coal, gas and the fossil fuel needed for transport and heating, we are going to obtain the energy we need. This energy must be, in this situation, electricity. The problem of generating a reliable supply, far greater than the present network, is never mentioned in any of these learned discussions. Did I say learned??? Sir David is a zoologist, and a very fine one, he also studied geology; he is not a physical scientist, chemistry of physics, or an engineer. But energy is these latter, it is not zoology . The only other named individual is MP Mark Pawsey, who has a degree in Estate Management. When is somebody going to appear, anywhere, and propose a scientifically demonstrable mechanism to explain how CO2, at about one fiftieth of concentration of the principal greenhouse gas, water vapour, manages to punch so much above it weight, hugely above?? Richard Phillips

Government commission necessary for 'just' transition to net-zero, trade unions argue

I read the TUC Report, and note the comments made by various people. The Report contained not one word on just how this conversion to a zero carbon economy would actually get its energy, nor did any of the people named above, who are all non technical. It has long been axiomatic in the field of technology, that the foundation science of any proposed scheme of work has to be demonstrably true, and that the ensuing engineering has to produce an economically viable process. Nature will not be thwarted by Acts of Parliament! Fine words are all very well, but when it comes to the nuts and bolts, that, is all they are. None of the upper echelons seem to notice the scale of the proposed policy. Nor does it seem to be realised that renewable energy is far too unreliable to pay any significant role in the undertaking. There is only one solution, that is a predominantly nuclear power generation system. This necessitates a complete regeneration of the Grid and all local supply systems. The political side of infrastructure does not have a clue of what is involved. I do not believe that it will come about. Richard Phillips

Official EU petition calls for minimum carbon price

I hope Eddie will publish the petition for us to sign once it is available.

Official EU petition calls for minimum carbon price

A crust above: Tesco to use waste bread in new products

1. How about working with local schools, colleges and universities and selling to them at a discounted price so that include these in their menu or cafeteria. 2. Distribute at a discounted price to Charitable organisations who help the needy and the elderly. Excellent initiatives Tesco - keep up the good work. This is the reason we shop at Tesco and will always shop at Tesco.

Report: Businesses hosting decentralised energy 'key' to meeting net-zero

invention from the ''70s was Starlite, which if coated on the walls and ceilings of the office and home, could cut heating and cooling bills to near-zero, automatic windows could control most of the temperature adjustment needs. See: https://www.starlitethermashield.com/ An alternative to Starlite is Fireputty, invented by Canadian Troy Hurtubise, who was looking for financial backing for lab time so that he could make a household paint out of it, before his untimely death.

UK unveils Green Finance Strategy to drive progress towards net-zero goal

Erratum to my last comment. I should have said, of course, that I regarded a total conversion to electric power as impossible, not the opposite. Put it down to an octogenarian midnight moment!!!! Richard Phillips

UK unveils Green Finance Strategy to drive progress towards net-zero goal

It has long been axiomatic in the field of technology, that the foundation science of any proposed scheme of work has to be demonstrably true, and that the ensuing engineering has to produce an economically viable process. Nature will not be thwarted by Acts of Parliament! I cannot persuade myself that to convert all our energy consuming devices to electricity, is an impossible task. We simply cannot construct the nuclear generating capacity in a mere 30 years, however much the politicians dream about it. And totally variable renewables cannot fulfil the task either, another Westminster dream. Richard Phillips

UK unveils Green Finance Strategy to drive progress towards net-zero goal

I have been contacting UK Prime Ministers since 1985 about my self-funding near-zero CO2 plan. The present one has had it for three years, and has not bothered to reply. She obviously has not told the G20 so I did it myself. There is no point in telling other members they should have near-zero CO2 emissions if she does not tell them how to do it. I campaign to have all politicians have IQs of at least 150 as 100 simply does not cut it.

The National Trust to divest entirely from fossil fuels

And what is a "fossil fuel" company? The major oil and gas companies are not just about fossil fuels. Hydrocarbons are used for far more than just burning, they are the raw materials for the Petrochemical industry that provides materials for solar panels, wind turbines, electric vehicles, lifesaving medical equipment, electronics, electrical insulation and a myriad of other everyday essentials. Is it not up to us, shareholders in Earth PLC, to reduce our demand for fuel and to preserve this valuable resource for far more vital applications than simply burning? And I am certain many NT properties are heated by gas so there is a certain level of hypocrisy going on too. As a major shareholder in oil & gas companies the NT could push for a greater sustainability within the economic model of the companies. We are going to need hydrocarbons for many many years so the oil & gas companies will still exist and will still make money. By divesting not only do NT lose their voice as shareholders but they allow less scrupulous investors to benefit from the dividends.

Conservative MPs set out green manifesto urging more eco-friendly policies

But they ignore concrete manufacture as they push on with large commercial developments such as HS2 etc....more imports of LNG from the other side of the world rather than lower impact domestic supplies...who s fooling who?

The National Trust to divest entirely from fossil fuels

Good call, now extend it to all construction groups that use concrete which has a very high carbon footprint- divest from infrastructure builders unless they are using sustainable products in construction....

UK's liquid gas sector targets 100% biofuel by 2040

Interesting article although it seems like the author is not aware of the difference between LPG (liquefied petroleum gas, mainly propane) and LNG (liquefied natural gas, i.e. methane). LNG is not used to heat 2 million homes, as the caption under an LNG ship states...

UK's liquid gas sector targets 100% biofuel by 2040

Interesting article although it seems like the author is not aware of the difference between LPG (liquefied petroleum gas, mainly propane) and LNG (liquefied natural gas, i.e. methane). LNG is not used to heat 2 million homes, as the caption under an LNG train states...

London Mayor calls for Green New Deal for the UK

It would be a start if more of our elected representatives were trained in science or engineering, then they would better understand the issues and what to do about reversing the rise in greenhouse gasses. Although the UK''s efforts in reducing CO2 will have minor impact on worldwide emissions, we need to set an example to other nations and use it to demonstrate what is possible.

UK's liquid gas sector targets 100% biofuel by 2040

It looks hopeful; however, nobody seems prepared to name the "various oils" used as feedstock. Granted that BioLPG will reduce CO2 emissions by its users, does it contain palm oil? The palm oil industry is responsible for vast and continuing deforestation in Indonesia and elsewhere. The gains from bio LPG would be nullified by the loss of carbon sinks in rain forests, not to mention the possible extinction of species like the Orang-Utan

Five key considerations for businesses attempting to reach net-zero emissions

As targets are seldom achieved I think 2030 should be made the target. Society has to change there is no option. Housing at present is still being built in the thousands as we speak with no thought of being energy efficient, inspite of requests to the local authority to enforce net zero standards, developers are all powerful in maintaining the status quo and will continue until forced to do otherwise. Pat Wilkinson

Co-op to halve emissions with 1.5C science-based target

Why show a picture of a plastic bag in an article about CO2 emissions. Plastic bags have the lowest CO2 emissions of all bags!

UK unveils Green Finance Strategy to drive progress towards net-zero goal

In principle, I support the proposed green finance initiatives. However, based on 15 years of experience within various Government initiatives Solar PV feed-in tariffs, Green Deal, Renewable heating incentive, ECO etc. The quality management of deployment has been abysmal. Often resulting in Housing associations and homeowners having to spend vast amounts of cash on rectification work. Money that could have been spent other priorities. So from lessons learned I fully support Richard Phillips comments and recommend that any new initiatives have a rigorous quality management program.

UK unveils Green Finance Strategy to drive progress towards net-zero goal

The money is absolutely useless if it not directed to projects founded on valid scientific principles, and directed by scientists and engineers having the relevant knowledge. If it is left in the hands of politicians, the vast majority of whom abandoned any study of science at GCSE level at 16, failure is inevitable. I note that the Energy and Clean Growth Minister, Chris Skidmore, (above), is a Modern History graduate, First Class. In matters of modern history I would bow to his very superior knowledge every time, but not in matters of energy generation and distribution. Our modern Parliamentary system of the obliged selection of Ministers from the Commons is entirely inappropriate to a knowledge lead Cabinet. This weakness is all too evident Richard Phillips

JD Sports joins RE100 as business pledges roll in for London Climate Action week

26,000 charges saving only 137 tonnes of carbon - sounds a bit low, have they used 2016 grid carbon figures, and are those EV''s not travelling very far?

V2G 'could cut £270m a year off cost of running UK power system'

This situation, the policies being ordained by those with minimal knowledge, if that, of the subject in question, is doing enormous damage to the whole structure of our society. This is especially true where science and engineering is involved. We have nobody in the Cabinet with a background in either, and in the BEIS or DECC, there has never been a Minister with any relevant knowledge. They seem to pick up catch phrases as they go. And when discussion and advice is offered, it is rebuffed. A faint sign of rebellion is to be found in the questioning of the need for the 1.5 degree limit by many nations at COP24. I can find no explanation for the so-called forcing effect of CO2. Indeed, when my questioning thoughts have been submitted to a number of "warmist" luminaries, the response is complete silence. Had it been found fallacious, I am sure that the heavens would have descended on me. Thanks for your comments, Ben. Richard Phillips

V2G 'could cut £270m a year off cost of running UK power system'

270 million a year? 1.86 GWh this doesn''t represent 0.38% of the uk demand. As Richard said below there isn''t enough cable in the ground let alone generation to recharge these cars. If we all go electric by 2030 we''ll have to build another 15 nuclear power plants. I''m seriously starting to question the people in charge of polices and general knowledge of these individuals making these outlandish claims. We need proper electrical engineers and scientists that can grapple these issues and deliver the solutions that the country requires.

V2G 'could cut £270m a year off cost of running UK power system'

No electrical engineering qualifications among the named persons, as far as I could determine. All business driven and full of caveats. Unless a great deal of new generation is built, there will be immense problems. And the provision of power chargers greater than 7KW will lead to cable problems all the way back. I just do not see it. Richard Phillips

edie launches report on landlords and renewable energy

It seems to be assumed that by the term "energy", referral is just to electricity. The sources of this electricity are principally wind and solar. During evenings and night-time, solar may be discounted, leaving principally wind. Is it known, at the moment, if the total demand of all the suppliers selling their product under the banner of "renewable", can have their total demand either at the time of demand, or in total watt/hours, met by the available supply. I would be greatly surprised, indeed I regard the first scenario as quite impossible, bearing in mind that metered wind generation (70% of total wind), can fall from its design capacity of about 20GW, to much less than 1GW for many tens of hours. It is on the record. I would be interested if anyone could show that, even considering generation over the year, that generation could cover even the present renewable demand of its'' advertisers. There is a great deal of difference between paying for "renewable" power, and actually getting it! Richard Phillips

Tideway's super sewer project is slashing transport emissions and combatting plastic pollution

This "fake news" with factual errors. It reads like a Tideway PR piece. The TTT will not "capture 39 million tonnes of sewage".but an estimated 18.4 million tonnes. The completed upgrade of Mogden sewage works and the Lee Tunnel have already dealt with the rest. There is zero evidence that the tunnel will deal with what this article claims. It is a contractual requirement that river transport is maximised but that didn''t stop Tideway seeking to change from river to cheaper road transport in Greenwich. Luckily for residents, their application was refused by Greenwich Council. The project is in financial difficulty and Tideway are seeking to cut costs. Regarding bottles, it was established by the Thames Tideway Strategic Study that 90% of rubbish in the Tideway is blown in by the wind or deliberately thrown in. For many years, there have been collection barges all along the Tideway that capture floating debris. The TTT is carbon intensive and not a sustainable, green solution to avoiding CSO''s (Combined Sewer Overflows) It is expensive and the opposite of what other cities throughout the world with same problem are doing. As Tideway are seeking to find cost savings, their first step should be to save Millions by shutting down their fake news PR department and concentrate upon getting the job done.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@Roger - yes I have read this and added my evidence to the debate. It''s still all a bit up in the air right now but there is sufficient argument for the Anthropogene to be created as a sub division of the current Holocene Period. Certainly the global appearance of plastic in sediments and fall out from the post WWII atomic weapons tests give a potentially very clear geological marker, as clear as the K-T Iridium layer that marks the end of the dinosaurs around 63 million years ago.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@Keiron if you a geologist you might be interested in the following although this is way off topic https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/30/anthropocene-epoch-have-we-entered-a-new-phase-of-planetary-history

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@Bob - yes you are correct. Our consumeristic economy is the 500lb Gorilla that no one wants to admit to. While our economy is based on buy shite we don''t need with money we don''t have there will continue to be a massive problem. I''m with you on making things last. I have a 20 year old Gore-Tex jacket that still looks as good as it did the day I bought it and still keeps me dry in the very wet climate of the NW Highlands. @Mark - Odd you ask about alternatives to plastics as my wife and I were out kayaking yesterday and noticed that our oaty bars were packaged in "non plastic packaging" that was "compostable in domestic composters". If this company (Stoates) can do this why can''t more of our packaging be made this way? Not only reducing the amount of plastic we produce then dispose of but also preserving the raw materials (oil and gas) for those more vital synthetic products that save lives or simply cannot be made from alternatives (for various reasons including safety). One thing about microplastics is they are slowly but surely being removed from the oceans by sedimentation. I know at present we are creating more than is being sedimented but the process is ongoing. These ocean sediments eventually get recycled back into the molten mantle of the planet via subduction. Might present an interesting set of new rocks when all this plastic gets erupted from a volcano at some time in the future. Will also present future geologists with an interesting dating tool as we know plastics didn''t exist before 1940. Being able to pin point the exact date of a sedimentary rock like that is a geological Holy Grail. Yes I am a geologist before you ask :-)

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

To some extent it depends on how dangerous nano and micro plastics are. They seem inevitable and unavoidable if we use plastics at all. We perhaps can limit losses of large plastic bits and reduce the damage they do to acceptable levels. I understand the evidence of harm from nano plastics is pretty incomplete but not absent. If the harm is as serious as that caused by CFCs on the ozone layer we will have to find safe replacements. This is likely to be from cellulose and lignin from wood or seaweed, and maybe we ought to do more of this anyway to avoid fossil carbon sources where possible. I do agree that our consumption based economic model will remain a challenge

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

Excellent comment from Roger Munford on the governance of collections comparing UK with Germany. What I am commenting on is the elephant in the bin- plastic packaging and other forms of plastic consumption are simply functions of... consumption. No amount of improved recyclability or collections will really address the fundamental issue that consumption , the growth of which underpins our economies and ways of life, must be reduced. The plastics debate is simply the top layer, both literally and metaphorically, of a consumptions lifestyle that is getting out of control. Every piece of "problem plastic" has a long tail of resource consumption and transport behind it. I seem to recall the figure of 70 kilos of resource needed for 1 kilo of consumption at end user. How do we wean ourselves off excessive consumption? Not sure quite frankly that it can be done via appeals to individuals. This is where (brave) government and regulation comes in : proper taxation of externalised costs currently foisted on to the planet and the public including a price for carbon; increasing the cost to on line retailers of delivery and returns (up to one third of all clothing orders...) restrictions on advertising volumes/locations for disposable fashion ( we do it for cigarettes and alcohol). And no doubt many more ideas that libertarians would cry foul at. The irony is that unless economies make the necessary adjustments there will be little left of those economies for gainsayers to protect their interests. And yes if you ask, I keep my clothes for many years, and it shows, they are still good as they were made to last....

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@Dave - Plastics are created from hydrocarbons which can also be fossil fuels but not necessarily. Polypropylene for instance is made from Propane which is a hydrocarbon gas sometimes used as a fuel (Calor Gas for instance). Many other longer chain polymers are made from hydrocarbons that have no or little use as a fuel source. And to be fair pretty much everything else we produce and consume uses fossil fuels somewhere in the chain. However, fuels are used to manufacture the polymers and at present much of this is Methane (Natural Gas) but there is nothing to stop Ineos installing a massive solar farm, installing wind turbines offshore and building hydropower to provide the energy required. And I would hazard a supposition they may even have that on the books as a plan for the future. We, as a society, have to learn to separate fuels from feedstock. Not all oil or gas is used as fuel. It''s around 50/50 at present and getting less on the fuel side as we switch to alternatives. We can''t keep wasting it by simply burning it as it is much more valuable as a petrochemical feedstock for many everyday things, such as the circuit boards in my laptop, medical equipment that saves lives, even the materials that make solar panels and wind turbines. Not to mention the plastics that go into making an Electric Vehicle.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

All credit to Hugh. He is the first high-profile figure that I have seen to state the blindingly obvious that plastics are produced by consuming fossil fuels and is therefore a very significant Global warming/climate change issue.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

"Plastic itself is not a problem material". Until the recycling rate of all types of plastic meet satisfactory levels and aren''t prompting War on Plastics programs as such, I disagree, it is very much a problem material. I agree with the valuable properties of plastic, but we must also factor in the total carbon footprint, from cradle to grave. How do you quantify the carbon footprint of a plastic bottle in 1 of the many plastic mountains in Indonesia? Is the mountain the end of life? Burnt (for energy)? Landfilled? Recycled? What the war on plastic program highlighted was the total lack of due diligence and until we know that, it's fair to assume the worst case scenario - burnt and landfill. When you factor that in, and the loose shipping containment C02 footprint from the UK to these far reaching countries, I'd argue there is little point wasting your time other than for completeness to compare it against the total C02 footprint of an aluminium can or other materials. In any given case, I'd argue that recycling plastic can never be the answer to the plastic problem. Where we actually manage to recycle a tiny proportion of plastic, it returns as polyester, carpets and fleece. Items I would deem to be far worse when you consider the microfibers and micro plastics. How do you recycle micro plastics? Recycling plastic back into its original form has no commercial value. What irked me with the program was when it came to the clothing microfiber segment. Sustainable clothing is a very touchy subject and Hugh dodged it well - it summed up the 3 part program. There is no easy answer and the only way out of this growing mess is a cultural shift in the way we think about the life cycle of goods. We have become a throw away nation, the world is becoming a throw away nation. Even with the best waste producer responsibility reforms, nothing will change. We need more organisations like Waitrose and the unpacked initiative to just step up and JFDI.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

Interesting to read comments from "outside" the plastics reduction world. The world''s biggest brands and retailers started to take reduction and replacement seriously at the tail end of 2018, and in the first few months of 2019. Anyone who is working at VP/Board level with big fmcg will know just how many substitutions are being made. This work takes years to see the light of day, but we are getting announcements on a regular basis. The touch paper has been lit.

Burberry to reduce emissions by 95% through approved 1.5C science-based target

Ian makes a valid point. The whole field of advice on energy and, by association climate, matters, seems to be very ill-defined, open to all-comers. One has only to recall the policy lines set out in June/July last year by the National Infrastructure Commission Chairman, on energy policy, again on the advice of a company in the field; the advice was utter nonsense. The area is the latest bandwagon. The SBTi is the core advisory body, the source of the science, not one of the advised, whom, I agree entirely, are not expected to have the top to bottom knowledge, that should be found in the advisory body, but I was surprised in its structure. I am persuaded that many cases of the supply of renewable energy are questionable. How many assurances of "100% renewable" can stand scrutiny? In times of low wind, is the demand always less than the available supply??? To make an argument that the overall supply in time, is sufficient, is to place reliance on fossil sources. I feel that there is quite a lot of snake oil lubricating the waggon wheels; follow the money! Richard Phillips

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

Roger / Keiron your points are well made, and as we know the retailers and supermarkets have made some real progress went it comes to packaging volume, but as you say there is still a lot of room for improvements. Whilst some package real does add value , by reducing wastage and extending shelf life, I can''t but help notice how much progress has been made on secondary packaging, that which is taken of in stores and generally back hauled to the distribution hubs for recycling as apposed to primary packaging. Our retails have made great inroads in to specifying the nature and materials which are entering their waste streams to optimise their recovery rated and reduce instore handling times. When in comes to primary packaging the progress has been much slower, with the exception of a few flagship brand, significant amounts of products are still frequently over sized and specified on appearance and brand over function. The mine is bigger and better value or quality to the rest on the shelf mentality. Hopefully, whilst it did have its flaws, this series and the profile of ocean plastic, Carbon Zero, and the Greta Thunburg effect with help change purchasing patterns and the price of PRN''s and the future impact of a plastic packaging tax and extended producer responsibilities will all help focus attention as much on the packaging waste that is placed in consumers bins and drive the move away from materials with little or no viable recovery market.

Burberry to reduce emissions by 95% through approved 1.5C science-based target

Richard Phillips - interesting point, but I''m not sure I would agree with you. I looked at the technical advisory board, and although many of the people don''t have a full academic record shown, most have other relevant expertise, including engineering degrees. Companies wishing to reduce their carbon emissions don''t really need to know or apply the understanding basic science - it''s mainly about good energy management, which in turn is partly engineering based, and partly behavioural science. But it''s also necessary to have other disciplines involved - you need accountants to be able to speak to the finance directors and explain why it makes good financial sense (or at worst, is not going to bankrupt the company)! My main criticism is that too many companies seem to rely on buying renewable energy, without fully considering additionality - ie. will that purchase lead to incremental renewable energy production (and hence an equivalent fall in fossil felled energy), or is it merely an accounting sleight of hand, so my greener supply makes everyone else''s electricity slightly browner?

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

Good summary and also a good comment from Keiron. I found myself agreeing with the Ineos exec that the problem was not plastic but plastic in the wrong place (putting aside other issues like energy etc) Responsibility for packaging ultimately rests with local authorities as part of traditional waste management. This is where the problem lies. Each and every local authority has to decide on what is done with every piece of packaging at almost no expense to the producer of the packaging. Recycling targets are too low and optional and collection and recycling has to compete with all the other local authority services. The new waste proposals by the government wont change that. There is a realisation that producers should bear more cost and responsibility which isn''t really much of a big idea but everything else stays the same with local authorities perhaps getting more funding but still packaging will be dealt with within local authority borders. Local authority borders are meaningless when it comes to the flow of shopping reaching households. Tesco decides how its goods are distributed based on population densities and transport links not on the local authority boundaries. When the packaging flows in the other direction from households to recycling it should also depend on population and transport links. Local authorities should be cut out of the chain. Germany did this decades ago. Every household in Germany has a free unlimited yellow bin for packaging only. Independent of the local authority. The collection and recycling is paid for by a small fee levied on the packaging. This system ensures that every piece of packaging in every part of the country has a route to the recycling process. Even litter bins on the tops of mountains are financed by this fee. Theoretically it is 100% coverage and leakage is due to the human factor. As a bonus, the fees are scaled according to how difficult the packaging is to recycle. Card is cheaper than plastic. There is a built in incentive to use the minimum amount of packaging. As an example look at the thin plastic yoghurt pots with a cardboard strengthener. This would work in the UK. It would also take a lot of expenditure out of local authorities but I am sure the government would take that back.

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

The big issue I have had with this series of programmes is there has been no (or very little) discussion on alternatives to plastic. It is all well and good focusing on the waste in the plastic world we live in, why on earth does a cauliflower need a plastic bag (especially a non recyclable one)? However what about alternatives we can switch too? The real eye openers were the piles of UK waste in Malaysia and the 16 tonnes of waste wipes Bristol produced in 3 days. Plastic itself is not a problem material. Single type plastic can be recycled readily and when used for durable packaging or goods plastic is often the very best material. It is hygienic, inert, durable and most of all lightweight. That reduces the amount of energy needed to transport goods which in turn reduces "carbon foot prints". Glass milk bottles needed reusing something like 30 times to become energy neutral but a plastic milk bottle, rinsed and recycled uses a lot less energy in transport. Sometimes the alternatives end up being worse for the environment because they require more energy to transport. Microfibre cloths replacing wipes sounds good until you realise the microfibres are made of synthetic (plastic) material too, ever wash of that cloth releases fibres into the water system of course. There is no simple fix other than for each and everyone of us to radically change our attitudes to life. As we all want cheap and convenient the market for plastic will continue. When demand drops companies like Ineos won''t need to manufacture as much and if a proper recycling regime can be found that allows for new plastic to be created from old then maybe, just maybe, a balance can be found. Oh and by the way it wasn''t a Redcar street but a Bristol one.

Beyond 'token' items: What's next for London's war on plastics?

Copying Nature''s Ability to Digest Plastic A team of Japanese scientists has found a species of bacteria that eats the type of plastic found in most disposable water bottles, and thus adds to the list of microbes that eat various plastics. The plastic found in water bottles is known as polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. It is also found in polyester clothing, frozen-dinner trays and blister packaging. Part of the appeal of PET is that it is lightweight, colorless and strong. However, it has also been notoriously resistant to being broken down by microbes -what experts call "biodegradation." Previous studies had found a few species of fungi can grow on PET, but until now, no one had found any microbes that can eat it. To find the plastic-eating bacterium described in the study, the Japanese research team from Kyoto Institute of Technology and Keio University collected 250 PET-contaminated samples including sediment, soil and wastewater from a plastic bottle recycling site. Next they screened the microbes living on the samples to see whether any of them were eating the PET and using it to grow. They originally found a consortium of bugs that appeared to break down a PET film, but they eventually discovered that just one of bacteria species was responsible for the PET degradation. They named it Ideonella sakainesis. Further tests in the lab revealed that it used two enzymes to break down the PET. After adhering to the PET surface, the bacteria secretes one enzyme onto the PET to generate an intermediate chemical. That chemical is then taken up by the cell, where another enzyme breaks it down even further, providing the bacteria with carbon and energy to grow. The researchers report that a community of Ideonella sakaiensis working this way could break down a thin film of PET over the course of six weeks if the temperature were held at a steady 86 degrees Fahrenheit. The various species of microbes that have been discovered within the degrading process of polyethene and nylon (both plastics) are as follows Moracella sp. (Bacteria), Pseudomonas sp. (Bacteria), Bacillus sp. (Bacteria), Diplococcus sp. (Bacteria), A. Niger (Fungi), A. Omatus (Fungi), A. Cremeus (Fungi), A. Candidus (Fungi) Yeast (Fungi). Other plastics are also digested. Aspergillus tubingensis, a fungus that can digest polyurethane Ideonella sakaiensis, a bacterium capable of breaking down PET Galleria mellonella, a caterpillar that can digest polyethylene It may well be that there are creatures that eat all of the types of plastic, we just have to find them. Much of these fungi can be located within moist environments. Specifically, there has been traces of many of these fungi living on the shores of beaches, as they have probably been washed up from a body of water, where a high concentration of bacterium have been found. Since these species of microbes have shown to be degrade plastic within the environment, they can have a significant positive impact on the emerging, evolving and growth of the population of various animals across the world. The larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella), can devour polyethylene, which along with the closely related polypropylene is the main type of plastic found in waste. But you would need billions of them to do it. It s possible that bacteria might, in fact, be responsible for the plastic-digesting ability of Galleria mellonella larvae. Another wax-eater, the Indian mealmot,h was found in 2014 to house bacteria in its digestive tract that can break down polyethylene. Galleria might prove to have such gut bacteria too. We must find out how the bacteria break down the plastic so that we can copy and concentrate it in the lab. It might not be desirable to breed large colonies of these species to eat our plastic because many would escape and potentially cause a lot of damage to the environment, but if we could work out the mechanism for their ability to eat plastic, and if we are able to duplicate and concentrate the method then we might be able to scale up our working model to an industrial scale that could deal with the threats that plastic poses for life on earth. Such an important and broad-ranging task should not be left to private industry, an intergovernmental body should oversee such work. Inventing plastic without inventing a safe way of disposing of it seems like having a war with no exit strategy, but this is where we find ourselves today. 300 million tons of plastic are produced each year, most goes to landfill and takes 500 years to decompose, some is recycled (10% in the USA), and some is biodegradable (emitting greenhouse gas methane in the process).Being able to digest the plastic with concentrated enzymes would give mankind a fourth option, we should take it. Please see: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/plastic-eating-enzyme-pollution-solution-waste-bottles-bacteria-portsmouth-a8307371.html

Private sector must be forced to invest in 'green revolution', says Labour

1980s technologies can decrease CO2 emissions to less than zero, but need central planning, more detail than can be fitted here can be seen at: http://kadir-buxton.com/near-zero-co2-plan In the early 1980s I came up with the world''s first self-funding near-zero CO2 plan, no major economy had adopted such a plan as yet. To summarize: A 10 kilometre deep lined and capped water well can convert all power stations to clean energy, a cut of 30% in CO2 emissions. A 20% cut would come from electrification of all vehicles. 41% would come from coating all buildings in Starlite. Aircraft and Ships could halve emissions by using fuel mixed with water using an ultrasonic dibber. Aircraft account for 6% of CO2, while shipping accounts for 4.5%, so another 5.25% can be saved. The total savings would then be 96.25%. Improving soil using biochar would then cut CO2 in the atmosphere by locking it in the ground. It can all be paid for by eliminating mental illness using the Kadir-Buxton Method. From: https://www.policyforum.labour.org.uk/commissions/commissions/environment/self-funding-near-zero-co2-plan

UK's offshore wind sector spurred by ?100m initiative

At least another 41% cut in CO2 emissions can be realised if we convert all houses and industries to near zero-carbon emissions. This does not have to be expensive. The cheapest and simplest method would be to paint the surfaces of all rooms with Starlite, invented by Maurice Ward; this would prevent heat escaping and so minimise heating requirements. As far as I am aware, the secret formula for Starlite was passed onto his immediate family members so has not been lost by his tragic death. Starlite can also prevent heat loss with attempts to store energy with molten salt, and Economy 7 radiators. If we can store all the excess capacity of electrical generation at night then we can cut the number of power stations needed so storage of energy is important. Maurice Ward Information See: https://www.starlitethermashield.com/ (This figure assumes that 80% of heating is by gas, and that domestic gas use is 29%, and industry heating is 22% of total energy consumption.) An alternative to Starlite is Firepaste, invented by Canadian Troy Hurtubise, we were looking for financial backing for lab time so that he could make a household paint out of it when he died, a great tragedy not only for friends and family, but for the environment as well. RIP. As both Maurice and Troy said that they made their inventions out of household products I am attempting to get a government lab set up to recreate their inventions.

UK's offshore wind sector spurred by £100m initiative

Yes! Another 2GW, 2,000MW But let us not forget that in overall terms this will generate an average of some 500MW. In addition, it may drop as low as 100MW or lower, for several days, together with a similar drop for all other turbines, when a large high pressure dominates the British Isles, as it did a year ago. At that time, May 28 to June 10, for a total of 180 hours, the metered output of 70% of the fleet was below 1GW, at times touching zero. The non-metered output is permanently connected and termed "negative demand". Should we live in an area in which turbines generated reliably, at a regular 50% efficiency, the wind would blow at 20mph at least, which at the moment it does for 20 days per year. We would not like it!!! Richard Phillips

Burberry to reduce emissions by 95% through approved 1.5C science-based target

Upon viewing the SBTi website, I noted that the only graduate science qualification whichI could identify, was a single Natural Sciences. Surely the basis for any work in this area has be in the realm of the physics and chemistry involved in the whole-life of all activities. With so little of these sciences, this must be difficult. Richard Phillips

IHG taps into AI technology in bid to slash food waste by 30%

Former National Grid boss Steve Holliday: We can't isolate oil & gas majors on path to net-zero

Do not see this at all. At present I have a Hydrogen concept and I am not even being asked to provide details. The Hydrogen engine is aimed at Auto and affordable Zero emissions EVs. It does also have effects on all energy generation. There is also a concept/project covering low cost Hydrogen production on demand = PDF from University of Nottingham - PhusionH2 The big issue I have with this defence of industry is that 26 years after the Shell video Shell and Oil & Gas Majors have done little. They have continued to undermine the "Science and need to change". They can see that to change to hydrogen they will lose out. Easy to see that anyone can produce Hydrogen so long as they put in place safe systems. They have stifled Hydrogen which has shown potential to work. I have a Hydrogen engine concept, lets see them put up 500,000 to a UK University to carry out initial modelling of this new engine type. Yes if indications are good this would make serious changes when linked with ACE II as adapted On board the EV fuel production system (PhusionH2-U of Nottingham) Sorry but the same H2 system will bring about H2 Combined Heat and Power units where a cassette containing materials will provide Hydrogen on demand

Aerospace giants back technology to provide 'relentless' aviation decarbonisation

Do you think we could stop using the word "electric" when we mean battery powered? For most people, electric power implies plugging in to the mains. For aircraft it means using energy stored as chemical energy in a battery and then converted to thrust in an engine, as with burning fuels. Motors by themselves are not much use, as we all know from running out of petrol at times...

Co-op to host reverse vending machines for plastic bottles at UK festivals

Hi Noah, the Co-op sent us a press release directly on this occasion. Best, Sarah, reporter, edie

Co-op to host reverse vending machines for plastic bottles at UK festivals

i cant find this story anywhere else, wheres the source?

War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita: 'Hidden' plastics placed in the spotlight

I checked while in a supermarket and microfibre cloths are indeed made from synthetic fibres as are the humble J cloth. I guess the few fibres lost from washing the microfibre cloths is an order of magnitude better than single use disposable wipes and given the ecological disaster that can be caused by cotton I think the lesser of two evils comes into play here. So I''m ditching the wipes and investing in some reusable, washable cloths.

War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita: 'Hidden' plastics placed in the spotlight

I saw a programme on how tea bags were made. You guessed it, with plastic, approx 30%, if I recall correctly. I wonder how much I''ve been drinking over the years, and how much is now in my garden due to composting. Contacted Taylor''s of Harrogate who make the tea I drink and they said they''re replacing plastic in their bags. Don''t know if it''s complete. I''d like to know what they''re using as well.

'Flagship' EV charging hubs to spark 'electric revolution' in London

The establishment of a network of charging points, must surely require a good understanding of the electrical engineering involved. High power units are involved, but I note that of the nine ChargePoint Team, only two have electrical engineering qualifications. This seems to be a modern trend, starting with the Cabinet!!! The final array of points, if all vehicles are to be EVs, will have a huge electrical demand, then there is domestic heating, I do not think that the generating capacity can be built on the timescales on the wish list. Richard Phillips

Five tips for building a CSR strategy from scratch - Five tips for building a CSR strategy from scra

Thank you very much for sharing this! To me, parts of this process sound very similar to Design Thinking - understanding the Problem before trying to find the solution, focusing on stakeholders etc. So maybe some tools from the Design Thinking process could help you (and others :) ) going forward!

'Flagship' EV charging hubs to spark 'electric revolution' in London

Need to figure out how to allow people who don''t have a garage or a drive, who park on the street or in communal parking areas to charge their EVs. Then London can claim to be a world leader as it bans all liquid fuel vehicles from its streets unless they pay a massive "clean air tax". Mind you I''d also ban all taxis from idling while waiting for a fare. The amount of fumes coming out of all those black cabs with their diesel engines running doing nothing must be horrendous.

War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita: 'Hidden' plastics placed in the spotlight

This show has been a real eye opener and should be required watching at schools. Only by educating the next generation and by using pester power will there be the massive cultural change needed to have a real impact. Seeing the 16 tonnes of wipes disposed of my one city (Bristol) in 3 days was astounding and has made me reconsider my use of wipes but what to use in replacement? Microfibre cloths would be the obvious but aren''t they made of synthetic materials too? As for the single use packaging around fruit and veg, well don''t get me started. In Morrisons this week I wanted some apples, loose they were 32p each. In a pack of 6, in plastic, they were 20p each!! WTF! And the plastic wrapping is not recyclable at this time! Supermarkets in Asia are now using banana leaves to package bundles of vegetables so how about we do the same. My only complaint about the programme is they are focusing on the amount of plastic but not on the alternatives enough. It is all well and good telling us wipes are made of 95% plastic but give some examples of what sustainable options there are to replace them and at what financial cost. Otherwise it is a great investigation and really hits home the massive impact our wasteful, convenience based, consumer driven life is having.

18 EU countries now support 2050 carbon neutrality goal

I invented the world''s first self-funding near-zero CO2 plan in 1985, funded by ending the scourge of mental illness using the Kadir-Buxton Method, which takes thirty seconds. This would save the UK alone 100 billion a year, enough to fund the rest of the plan. My plan can be seen at: http://www.kadir-buxton.com/near-zero-co2-plan Since it''s invention in 1985 no UK Prime Minister has answered my letter about it in writing, never mind implemented it.

UK to be left with five coal power stations after Fiddler's Ferry closure

The introduction of my invention Economy 7 shut four power stations in the UK in 1974. We could update the radiators with a coating of Starlite to bring them up to date and then install them in every house ready for clean electricity, and to cut the need for fossil fuels by using night time electricity during the day. (This saves on the time wasted in getting coal power stations up to speed).We could also install a battery in every home so that airconditioning is also clean.

Conservative Party leadership: What are the final 10's records on environmental policy?

The ''Gove-effect'' has been 100 times that of the Leadsom (she was his predecessor). Anyone disagree?

Scotland and Wales place hopes in battery power

The important measure is KW h not KW. More data please.

War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita: Supermarkets brace for further backlash on packaging

Congratulations on outstanding reporting! Please come over to the USA (the colonies) and have a go at the same thing here. We need it desperately!!!

War on Plastic with Hugh and Anita: Supermarkets brace for further backlash on packaging

We have been here before! Back in the late 1990s, people had become worried about waste packaging, especially plastics. WRAP (Waste and Resource Action Programme) was set-up to promote sustainable waste management. Also in 2005, the Courtould Commitment, a voluntary commitment to reduce was signed by the major UK supermarkets. Nearly tens years later, we are still talking about the problem, despite the propaganda, that the UK was doing something about it! The UK is still very much, the ''Dirty Man of Europe''. http://www.wrap.org.uk/

Prime Minister agrees legally binding net-zero emissions target for 2050

Yes we need to achieve this but it needs to be on a life-cycle analysis basis to negate any unintended consequences on social and environmental grounds from the mining of minerals.

UK Government's Smart Export Guarantee to stabilise small-scale renewables market

"cost of residential solar panels which are now more than 50% cheaper compared to 2011" The cost of panels is way cheaper than 50% but electricians and scaffolding etc are slightly more expensive. Do we have to wait to 2020? Octopus Energy and others are offering something like 5.5p Kwh for export. Bless them

Business giants launch plastics 'credit' scheme to tackle pollution

I never get excited about schemes for offsetting, crediting etc because we all know they will be ineffective and open to abuse. It just extends the status quo but gives the impression that something serious is being done. I would recommend a look at the German System where the packaging producers are responsible for the collection and recycling of the packaging once used. Not as complex as you might think but simple and elegant. The producers have to pay a fee for every piece of packaging they produce. This fee is used to pay for a free, nationwide collection and recycling service (yellow bin). The harder the packaging is to recycle like tetra paks the more they have to pay.

Groceries 'Unpacked': Waitrose pilots packaging-free refill offering

Hi Keiron, Waitrose has ensured that all of the products available loose will be sold for at least 30p per kilo less than the packaged versions of own-brand lines in this case. Best, Sarah, edie.

Groceries 'Unpacked': Waitrose pilots packaging-free refill offering

It has to be as cheap or better still cheaper to purchase fruit and veg, dry goods and even beer and wine than to purchase the plastic wrapped, plastic bottled variety. When families are living hand to mouth and every penny counts it doesn''t matter how "green" something is, if there is a cheaper alternative people will choose it when it is the difference between overdraft and money in the bank or heating the house or fuelling the car to get to work

Parliament to debate bill committing UK to net-zero by 2050

Question-will this be based on life cycle analysis or purely on GHG? There is a big difference and there could be unintended consequences if life cycle analysis is not used.

Parliament to debate bill committing UK to net-zero by 2050

Only if every molecule of Carbon Dioxide is counted and that includes every breath we take. OK that might sounds ridiculous but the fact that Drax gets renewable subsidies to ship thousands of tonnes of wood pellets across the Atlantic, burning hundreds of thousands of litres of fuel oil every trip, not to mention the diesel used to truck them about and the petrol used to operate the chainsaws, does make a mockery of any claims to be "carbon neutral" or net zero carbon. It isn''t just about being net zero carbon but reducing energy wastage across the board, from our homes to our offices to our industries. Then reducing material wastage so we don''t just use something once and throw it away. Everything we do every single day uses energy and creates waste products be that solid waste (plastic bags etc) or waste heat (which may be a bigger driver than CO2 in climate warming). Biggest thing we can all do to help though is simple. Grow plants! Window boxes, hanging baskets, pots, raised beds, allotments, rooftop gardens. Green leafed plants everywhere. Clean the air, take in CO2 give out O2, improve air quality and humidity. If we really want to be green then we all need to grow things and stop throwing stuff away.

Waitrose to invest £1m in innovative projects tackling plastic waste

Hi Would it not be customary that all of the plastics can be recovered in a new product . This product can be recycled and also reused we have a product like this because we can recycle a lot . But we have the product and have to use it for sustainable products new materials and products that can be reused and recycled . We have such product(s) but are in need of funds to start everything .

Government urged to set 2040 net-zero target for Humber

"Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond and BEIS's Clark reportedly recommended that the CCC's advice should be rejected, largely on the grounds of upfront cost and economic and social risk." Added to these doubts are the sheer technical problems, as near to impossibilities as it is possible to go, of achieving the goals set out. It is totally impossible to generate the electrical power needed on a demand lead (or any other) basis, by the use of renewable power, and the prospect of constructing the number of nuclear stations needed, in a mere 25 to 30 years, is risible; our nuclear industry was destroyed 30 years ago, all the expertise has to be rebuilt. The CCC report; forget it. Richard Phillips

Fish scale plastics and lifts which store energy: The best green innovations of the week

Fully electric ferries; smooth, quiet, I am sure, but where is the electricity to charge it going to come from when all the other "electric" vehicles, so eagerly promoted, are built. All the car manufacturers are moving, so it seems, to EVs. This means that electricity has to be generated, from non fossil sources, to replace all the diesel and petrol currently powering our cars and lorries. Renewables are too intermittent, nuclear seems to be stalled. Policies are in the hands of politicians who are almost totally ignorant of the technology. The generating capacity to be set in place is too large for the present Grid to carry, and which will have to be heavily up graded; from power station to household. Fuel from air. Energy will be needed to extract the CO2, at 0.04% from the air. The Fischer-Tropsch reaction is energy adsorbing. The fuel will not return the energy used in in production. At very best the return is equal, but that discounts inefficiency. Richard Phillips

'Radical action by 2030' needed to tackle Scotland's climate challenges

Apart from the fact that Scotland is still rebounding after the last ice age so we experience Sea Level drop around the country, most clearly seen as raised beaches at many locations so one has to ask where all the coastal flooding is going to come from.

UK celebrates first coal-free fortnight for electricity grid

Yes, Emma Pinchbeck is an ideal commentator and director on the technical side of electricity generation, MA Classics and English, and a management course. I was an FRIC, and worked for 35 years at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, just not the same is it? Richard Phillips

UK celebrates first coal-free fortnight for electricity grid

Word of the day is Serendipity! :) I await with baited breath for the this statement in 2025 to be fulfilled ''''There is still a lot of work to do, but operating a zero-carbon electricity system in 2025, whenever there is sufficient renewable generation, is a major steppingstone to full decarbonisation of the entire electricity system. This will enable new technologies and removes barriers to ever-increasing levels of renewables''''...... Emma Pinchbeck The barrier will be the renewables and the intermittency of generation. The more renewables the more gas fired peaking plants will need to run in the dark and zero wind days, collectively still producing carbon and in sum scenarios more carbon that the reduction created by continuous ramping up & down of generators. Instead of looking at how many days we didn''t burn coal I suggest looking at the days that wind didn''t produce energy v''s the Co2 saving that where lost. Wind energy is still the greatest swindle of consumer taxes funding, propping up hopes and dreams of intermittency in a Serendipity way!

UK celebrates first coal-free fortnight for electricity grid

Yes, its been warm, its called serendipity. Richard Phillips.

Report: Clear CCUS policy needed for UK net-zero emissions goal

The new report analyses commitments made under the Clean Growth Strategy, which committed up to 20m for viable CCUS schemes as the UK forges ahead with its coal plant phase out by 2025. Does it not occur to anyone in this business that if CCUS could me made to work at a sensible cost, then coal become an ideal source of energy for electricity production? Why do we persist with this ilogocal policy of seeking to ban coal while devising the system that makes it acceptable?

UK 'to double' aid support for climate challenges in developing nations

How about spending that extra 1 billion at home? Helping the lower income households access cleaner, greener energy sources, helping lower income homes insulate better so they don''t spend so much staying warm or helping everyone, no matter their income, be able to install renewable heating and power in every home. Great that we help poorer nations advance and miss the dirty fuel stage or help remote farming communities in sub saharan Africa have light but charity starts at home and there are thousands living in fuel poverty in this country.

UK goes 11 days coal-free (and counting)

But not gas free. As well as coal free, there have been occasions when the power supply has also been very nearly wind energy free as well. When you can command the wind will be the day to raise your banner. Richard Phillips

Public EV charge points outnumber petrol stations in the UK

Well said all. An EV owning acquaintance, with a car having a range of 140 miles, has had bad experiences with expected charging points being out of order, and, on one occasion just making the next, on the motorway pushing the last few yards! When batteries are the same size and weight of my 60+litre tank, fit for 500+ miles, the price of the cars are competitive, and the power stations to supply current have been built; perhaps they will become popular. In the meantime, count me out! Richard Phillips

IEA: Developed nations should support nuclear to reach climate goals

It is Fatih Birol, a Turkish gentleman. And he is absolutely correct. The idiocy, founded on gross ignorance of the science and engineering facts of nuclear energy, of shying away from nuclear power is quite mind numbing. No renewable source is able to generate on a demand lead basis, or at the level required, the founding essentials of power provision. The present mob-lead craze for "zero carbon" is a road back to the stone age, just think about it. The inmates are truly ruling the asylum. Richard Phillips

Public EV charge points outnumber petrol stations in the UK

Really? Pull the other one it has a whopping great bell on it! Here in Fort William we have 4 charging points located in 2 out of the way car parks. Morrisons Fuel Station has 8 fuel pumps as do Gleaner, BP and Esso for a total of 32 fuelling points. A liquid fuelled vehicle can fill up in around 5 minutes. An EV around 15 and that is to 80% full. When EV''s can fill up to the brim in 5 minutes and there are an equivalent number of charge points located where people might actually go to use them (ie Fuel Stations) then you have something to sing from the roofs about.

Drax confirms plans to create UK's first zero-carbon cluster in Humber

I see that I made an omission that must be puzzling, in my first comment. It should have read: 2 Volume for volume, hydrogen contains only ONE THIRD of the amount of energy a natural gas, methane. Thus for the same purpose , three times the volume is needed; or at three times the pressure. Ten in the morning is far too early for advancing octogenarians!! Richard Phillips

Public EV charge points outnumber petrol stations in the UK

Come on, let s get real, how many pumps on each forecourt, when there are more recharging points than refuelling points then you can boast.....

Public EV charge points outnumber petrol stations in the UK

This is great news BUT at most petrol stations there are 15 or more petrol pumps....thus we need 15x more points and then we need to solve the charging time issue..... is charging the right option? What about battery changes....

Drax confirms plans to create UK's first zero-carbon cluster in Humber

Just two major facts about hydrogen that sink it entirely as a major player in energy provision. 1. Since it does not occur naturally, every single molecule has be made. this involves using some other form of energy. The hydrogen generated will, when used, provide less energy than that consumed in its manufacture. Simple, unavoidable inefficiencies. (Natural gas provides orders of magnitude MORE energy than needed for its production). 2 Volume for volume, hydrogen contains only the amount of energy than natural gas, methane. Thus for the same purpose, three times the volume is needed; or three; or three timed the pressure.. And it is awkward to handle, but engineers and scientist can look after this, after all they are the people trained to accomplish the practicalities of this world, not just speculate. Richard Phillips

UK's Department for Transport

The FOE report is a lot more nuanced than Keiron Shatwell implies. Its main criticism is around the methodology applies by DfT when evaluating new roads, which is claims is biased towards time costs of motorists, and its failure to mesh into Government carbon targets. LEPs are singled out for their lack of local accountability, and a seeming focus on development for development''s sake. The recommendation that Highways England should have its own carbon budget seems sensible, although even this could be criticised as not joined up enough with rail and aviation policy.

UK's Department for Transport

And how do FoE propose reducing individual road journeys when there frequently is no other option for people to get to shops/work/have a life etc? Go back to horse and cart? It is all well and good them bashing the Dept for Transport but they never offer up meaningful or realistic solutions to the problems. When they lead by example and stop driving to protests or flying around to conferences or to protest at conferences then perhaps more people will start to listen to them.

Deliveroo launches electric scooter rental scheme in London

Estd 1983, we are now working as an online trader only. We have our own brand of scooters and electric mopeds. And stock premium brands of Powacycle electric bikes. We offer the cheapest cost and best service. https://www.electricbikescootercar.co.uk/electric-bike/

No 'low hanging fruit' left for energy innovation, M&S says

The statement that there is no longer any "low hanging fruit" is I suspect deliberately intended to provoke comment. I have found that if a different energy manager takes a look at a "well managed " site they find things that have been previously missed.even by better qualified colleagues. We need to avoid complacency that the simple things have been done - it is rather a "Red Queens Race" in that measures need to be maintained as people often slip into wasteful behaviour over time.

Onsite solutions and behaviour nudges: How to take an energy strategy to the next level

The measurement of energy behaviour change should be approached in the same way as any other energy reduction project. Ofcourse the metering infrastructure needs to be robust to provide quality data that enables the impact to be accurately measured and reported but in our experience the ROI for energy behaviour change projects far exceeds those of traditional technical interventions and have the added benefit of not requiring capital investment.

On the Mission Possible sofa with Frank Aaskov, Ben Golding and Shamit Gaiger

No 'low hanging fruit' left for energy innovation, M&S says

I disagree, there are many "low hanging fruits" left if we look closely. Energy efficiency for a start, simple things like {as ARP used to shout} "Turn that bloody light off". M&S may have invested in "shelf edge tech" to push cold air back but CO-OP put doors on their fridges - simples. Sometimes we can''t see the wood for the trees and while there is an element of truth that new innovations will make a difference there are still many many simple, easy and low cost things we can all do

Rewild a quarter of UK to fight climate crisis, campaigners urge

Why not "rewild" urban areas by encouraging vertical gardens, roof top gardens and revitalising scrubland, wasteland and other wasted land into parks and other green spaces? Not only do you help nature you make the urban environment that little bit nicer for humans too. Leave the rural environment to it''s own devices and stop telling those of us who live in wild and remote areas what we should be doing. Fix the manmade urban areas first, return the greenery to towns and cities.

Hydrogen storage 'sponges' and 'infinitely' recyclable plastic: The best green innovations of the we

''It is difficult to envisage just who are the "experts from across the technology and science spheres" who "are touting it (hydrogen) as a key component in delivering a net-zero power sector". Well, lets start, shall we? First there are some reports: Navigant/Ecofys, P yry, KPMG, E4Tech, Policy Exchange, Frontier Economics, etc Then some articles by people in the industry; professors etc: energypost .eu/50-hydrogen-for-europe-a-manifesto/ iea .org/newsroom/news/2019/april/the-clean-hydrogen-future-has-already-begun.html knect365 .com/energy/article/f6838ddc-7c67-4e52-b5b7-fdd4f8137e28/how-can-europes-gas-networks-be-decarbonised ey .com/uk/en/industries/power---utilities/ey-the-potential-role-for-hydrogen-in-a-decarbonised-energy-system Then engineers: thechemicalengineer .com/tags/clean-energy-sig-the-hydrogen-economy imeche .org/news/news-article/towards-a-hydrogen-economy---an-imeche-and-icheme-joint-event Then there are the gas companies themselves: northerngasnetworks .co .uk/event/h21-launches-national/ hynet .co .uk/ Then the government: gov .uk/government/publications/hydrogen-for-heating-emissions-potential-literature-review gov .uk/government/publications/hydrogen-supply-chain-evidence-base ..and the list goes on. Why not educate yourself? Do some reading?

TerraCycle: Recycling alone won't tackle 'root cause' of plastics waste crisis

The problem is NOT plastics or consumer convenience. The problem is reliance on selective recycling and consumer participation. We can get it all back into the circular economy... https://www.packworld.com/article/sustainability/waste-energy/plasma-gasification-can-enable-circular-economy-sustainability

Hydrogen storage 'sponges' and 'infinitely' recyclable plastic: The best green innovations of the we

It is difficult to envisage just who are the "experts from across the technology and science spheres" who "are touting it (hydrogen) as a key component in delivering a net-zero power sector". The physical and chemical properties of hydrogen need to be considered, and compared with methane which it is proposed it should, in the major part, replace. Hydrogen does occur in nature; every molecule has to be manufactured. By whatever means this is achieved, more energy is expended in this manufacturing process than is derived from its use. Inefficiencies are inevitable. Methane, with all its potential energy of combustion is to be procured by drilling; the energy advantage is huge. Volume for volume, hydrogen contains only about one third of the energy of methane. See Avogadro and the energies of combustion. This implies that for equivalent duties, three times as much hydrogen has to provided than methane. Storage capacity, at the same pressure has to be tripled, also. The same applies to pipeline capacity; triple the cross sectional area, or the pipeline pressure. At moment the gas grid operates at 50 bar, 750 psi. Hydrogen is not a particularly amenable material to handle. Equipment has to be very gas-tight, and constructed from particular materials, not always the cheapest. Considerable modification is need for end user appliances. All the energy needed to generate the hydrogen has to be generated elsewhere. Hydrogen does not seem to advance the situation. Safety is also a consideration if domestic use is to be considered, it has the widest explosive range of any gas. Richard Phillips

Bringing Energy Home: Labour unveils plans for solar homes and grid renationalisation

Why limit this to just local authority and low income households? While a fine idea and to be applauded as energy poverty hurts those on low incomes hardest shouldn''t everyone have access to assistance to upgrade to low carbon self generation? Government backed interest free loans or grants help spread the cost of these kinds of improvements even for those of us on higher incomes. I can''t afford thousands of pounds for solar panels or for a Ground Source Heat Pump (especially if I have to up rate my entire heating system to work with this) but apparently I earn too much but it is my tax money that will be used.

Tesco slashes food waste by 17% in one year

It has long been my view that it is the very concept of Supermarket shopping that is largely responsible for wasteful practices. Customers tend to travel, say, once per week by Car to carry out an extensive shop. Large Car Parks are provided to facilitate and encourage such habits. In so doing, Customers tend to over-purchase ''just in case'' they may run out of any particular item(s). Almost invariably, this leads to home stocking of unused products - which then may have to be discarded, regardless of whatever measures or initiatives the Retailer may have arranged. I patronise my local TESCO store several times per week on Foot or by Bicycle, buying perishable items only for immediate need or refrigeration. However, there are some 750 Car-Parking Bays, but only three poor-quality Cycle-Parking Stands! I have raised this with TESCO, but the Company has declined to engage on this aspect of the issue. David S Garfield

Inside P&G's plastics packaging strategy

This is good to hear. However, it seems that awareness and understanding of the impacts of not just plastics but chemical pollution generally affecting our air, land, and water systems is going to need to a lot more, and faster, action than any of these companies presently seem to be planning for. The fact that plastics are affecting the seas basic food chain and production of oxygen is alarming and it makes me wonder what else we have not yet noticed.....

Inside P&G's plastics packaging strategy

This is a powerful move from a substantial user of plastic packaging that should be a demonstration to other manufacturers about what can be done to reduce and eventually eliminate the scourge of plastic waste.

Skanska UK pledges to become a carbon-neutral business by 2045

The purchase of renewable electricity, and for some organisations, the declaration that they will purchase "100%" renewable electricity, is a puzzling one. If the power purchased is at a time when the total demand for renewable electricity is high, but the generation is low, the claim is simply invalid. Is the information available, at all times, of the total renewable generation, able to be compared with the total consumption by those having an agreement to purchase "100%" renewable power. It is not valid to equate the total wattage supplied over a year with that paid for by the consumer. A deficit of renewable power at any time has to supplied by either fossil or nuclear power. If nuclear power is removed from the equation as not being "renewable", the situation is even more questionable. It is my suspicion that a great deal more power is purchased and paid for as "renewable", which is nothing of the sort. Are instantaneous figures available which can prove or disprove this matter? Richard Phillips

London ranked among cities leading global climate action

Ok, you might regard this as picky Sarah, but (and I think it''s an important "But") since when has London only been the capital of England? Even allowing for devolution and the creation of regional governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, London, surely it is still regarded as the United Kingdom''s capital?

London ranked among cities leading global climate action

Ok, you might regard this as picky Sarah, but (and I think it''s an important "But") since when has London only been the capital of England? Even allowing for devolution and the creation of regional governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, London, surely it is still regarded as the United Kingdom''s capital?

London ranked among cities leading global climate action

Ok, you might regard this as picky Sarah, but (and I think it''s an important "But") since when has London only been the capital of England? Even allowing for devolution and the creation of regional governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, London, surely it is still regarded as the United Kingdom''s capital?

Dyson unveils electric car blueprint

This car cannot be truly "innovative and disruptive" unless it is powered by something other than NMC battery chemistry. Dyson''s well known but failed (??) foray into solid state technology (Sakti3) leaves one wondering what his business plan can be? At the end of the day, manufacturing cars en masse looks like a business for a mass-market car manufacturer as demonstrated by the rolling crises at Tesla. This article carefully avoids any mention of EV battery technology, which, in any case, is dominated by China

Transport 'best place to start' for hydrogen economy

I welcome this approach albeit that, outside London & some other large conurbations, there''s already been huge cutbacks in road based public transport - due to related funding cuts to local government - this on top of the continuing impact of the late mid 20th Beeching rail cuts

Cambridge University agrees to explore fossil fuel divestment plan

Not all oil is burnt. More is used in the petrochemical industry than in fuels. Things like Solar Panels, Wind Turbines, Electrical Insulations, Battery Components, Electric Vehicle parts to name a few "Green" things are all made from petrochemicals. Whilst we all continue to want our smartphones, laptops and other tech gadgets, our synthetic sports wear, our elasticated pants and a myriad of other modern day items humanity will continue to need people to find and extract hydrocarbons. Think about it before you divest from oil companies. And remember that not all "green" investments are necessarily better for you, your pension or the planet. Have you seen the damage a Lithium mine does?

British Airways boss: No 'silver bullets' for aviation to tackle climate change

The aviation industry likes to keep the dialogue focussed on carbon dioxide as this is a better story for them than greenhouse gas (or CO2 equivalent) measures which is what ultimately matters in addressing climate change. This is because it ignores the forcing factor effect that applies to aviation. This has a multiplier impact on the warming over the raw carbon dioxide. The largest component of this is NOx. Aviation gas turbines get a free ride on emitting this gas. The very same engines, if used in terrestial applications have to take measures to suppress this. Airlines don''t - mainly because of the impracticality and cost. There is no such thing as a sustainable alternative to jet fuel as, even in the unlikely event that a biofuel could be developed which did not have emissions associated with its production (and I am particularly thinking of indirect land use here), the NOx would still be produced. It is time for this industry to stop this greenwash and be much more honest in its dealings on this matter.

British Airways boss: No 'silver bullets' for aviation to tackle climate change

How is generating jet fuel from waste going to lead to negative emissions? Much of the waste is comprised of plastics and other non-renewable or carbon intensive resources, so by converting these to fuel, it will release carbon that would otherwise remain buried in the ground.

UK Government must align funding aid with 'net-zero' to tackle global climate challenges, MPs warn

It is notable that the IDC, making pronouncements highly relevant to the climate impact of CO2, contains not one member who can be traced to have any graduate level knowledge of the physics, chemistry and engineering involved. It would be interesting to have their views on the value of 3, for the ECS used by the IPCC to configure their models. Richard Phillips

Selfridges completes palm oil phase-out nine months ahead of schedule

PROACTIVE PARTICIPATION BY SELFRIDGES NEEDED TO END DEFORESTATION FOR PALM OIL http://poig.org/proactive-participation-by-selfridges-needed-to-end-deforestation-for-palm-oil/

Selfridges completes palm oil phase-out nine months ahead of schedule

It''s unfortunate that Selfridge jumped on the misguided "Just Say No to Palm Oil" bandwagon started by Iceland. Organisations engaged in this issue agree that a blanket boycott of palm oil is not a solution, and rather call on retailers and manufacturers to source deforestation-free Certified Sustainable Palm Oil, which is currently available from the grower members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group.

Seven top tips for making your organisation a purpose-led business

Thanks for sharing these tips and totally agree that a company''s purpose (Why) should be in large letters everywhere for it to have credibility and for it be a constant reminder for employees as to why they get up in the morning to go to work!

What is a 'climate emergency'?

One thing to remember in all this "hype" is not all Oil & Gas is used for fuel. Much of it is actually used to make things, many of which are life saving such as pharmaceutical and medical products and many are vital to the running of our high tech society. Many are also used to make the very products that "enviro-mental-ists" champion such as wind turbines, solar panels and electric vehicles. So while I agree we can not continue to waste this vital resource by simply burning it modern society will continue to need to exploit it for a long, long time yet. And if that means hydraulically fracturing rocks to get the raw material then it will have to happen. Unless we want to go back to living in mud huts with tallow candles and hessian undergarments. Lycra, for instance, is an oil based product and it holds your underwear up.

Net-zero emissions by 2050: CCC publishes long-awaited recommendations for UK Government

Net-zero emissions by 2050: CCC publishes long-awaited recommendations for UK Government

We face a climate emergency - which I have been saying for some years - it gives me no pleasure to be right & indeed causes me distress. Emergencies by definition need responses that are fundamentally different from responses in a "steady-state" BAU situation. The concluding chapters of the book "Voltaire''s Bastards" (J R Saul) covers this. Unfortunately, the people that produced the CCC report are also the people that Saul eviscerates (the only word applicable) in his book. They are "the safe pair of hands" who will give an acceptable ("right response") to those in power. The fact that the Committee is headed by Gummer an ex-politico demonstrates the truth of this statement. The report is also a framing exercise, evidenced when the CCC report talks about "costs" - when it means capital investment and rate of return for a given output (or levelised cost of electricity). A TECHNICAL report, one supposes, is written for experts & thus demands some precision in expression. That there is lack of precision suggests a framing exercise - & given the make-up of the committee (one member ex-Treasury) this seems likely. The report also suggests significant "group think" - certainly with respect to CCS - which addresses a symptom (CO2 emissions) rather than a cause (fossil fuel burning). UK production of hydrogen (from renewable resources) seems to be dismissed and the report notes that "Imports of low-carbon hydrogen might complement domestic production" (from SMR/CCS). Why not take a DIY approach? After all the UK some pretty good electrolyser companies - perhaps supporting UK companies was not in the remit of the CCC? There is also the blithe assumption that in a hi-RES situation there is still a place for nuclear. There might be, but only if, on a nice sunny day (the UK has them) you constrain off PV - & you will need to constrain off a great deal. The report also offers hostages to fortune with statements such as "so-called merchant renewables - projects that don''t rely on a Government backed contract - will likely be limited in volume and are considered highly unlikely for offshore wind". There have been several zero-subsidy off-shore wind projects - more are likely & it will only be a matter of time before merchant projects occur. One is left with the impression that the CCC does not want to see such projects since they would upset some of the reports key points (particularly wrt to CCS and H2). The report also contains some wishful thinking - page 24 - "further new build nuclear" - begging the question - who will do the building? who will fund it? Certainly not the Japanese (ref: Toshiba & Hitachi exit), the Russians? the Chinese? Page 25 contains this interesting statement: "These scenarios assume that most of the UK s heating systems switch to electric heat pumps". This statement predicates: a) a re-build of the totality of the UK electricity distribution network b) an in-depth energy renovation of every house. The section on RES potential sees the CCC asserting that off-shore wind potential is 95 - 245GW. This assertion is backed by the statement: "Offshore wind farms also face siting restrictions, such as seabed depth, and avoiding areas sensitive to wildlife (including bird migration routes), fishing and shipping routes and military zones" The report notes that the "Further Ambition Scenario" would see 75GW of off-shore wind built by 2050 (i.e. 2.3GW per year) and this would cover 1 - 2% of the UK''s seabed. The implication is that the UK seabed is so constrained (by existing interest) that only 1 to 2% is available. Note: we face a climate emergency - but the CCC report suggests anything but. 2.5GW/year for off-shore wind is not "mobilising for a war against climate change" it is BAU. LCOEs are also highly questionable - these are very high when compared to mainland Europe (particularly so with respect to wind) and suggests a mix of British insularity and complacence (with respect to the possibility that a) they are high b) they could be brought down). Having had meetings with BEIS in the past, I can state that whilst publicly it supports high LCOEs (presumably to keep gas in business), privately it accepts points a) and b) - thus is policy hypocrisy alive and well in government institutions. The tech report is 300 pages long. the above is intended as illustrative. The report is produced by the wrong people, lacks urgency, assumes BAU and features group think on a large scale. It should be binned and something fit for purpose produced and with a bias in terms of "it''s an emergency, what do we need to do fast and how can we make sure UK industry is part of the solution and not a bystander.

India's clean energy revolution set to price out imported coal

Firstly I would like to thank you for such a wonderful piece of information on India''s clean energy plan. It is true that India is a developing country and now it is emerging as the fastest growing economy and to fulfill its dream of becoming developed nation energy is a priority. Clean energy is contributing 13 % in total energy production of India as I came to know by an online Hindi news article. Your blog gave me a lot of information on this matter so thanks a lot.

High Court dismisses climate case against third runway at Heathrow Airport

I don''t think that carbon offsetting should be an available option as this creates a false economy with regards to emissions and is not synonymous with carbon reduction in my view.

Decarbonisation by 2050 can be achieved at 'very low cost'

The elephant in the room is the 50% of U.K. energy is heat mainly from gas. Proposal is to electrify that...and we have yet to cut turf on a new power station...the electric network would need upgrading etc all at a cost no one wants to talk about....as for electric trucks they cost three times the price to go a third the distance of a diesel one with a 25%!payload hit (5 trucks needed for every current 4 = congestion). 15% shortage currently in truck drivers...can we have pragmatic workable plans please...

Framework launched to deliver net-zero built environment

There can be little excuse for all new homes not being zero-carbon before the end of this decade, not the next one. It would likely cost much less than 10k to achieve this for each house/flat, but it will cost multiples of that, if possible at all, for the millions of homes that will be built in the 11 years until 2030, as they will need to become zero-carbon along with many of the 26 million existing properties. This approach is purely profit-driven, not climate driven.

Decarbonisation by 2050 can be achieved at 'very low cost'

Decarbonisation by 2050 can be achieved at 'very low cost'

The Climate Change Committee are tarnished by financial links to powerful renewables NGOs. They are, to a man/woman, demonstrably anti-nuclear and willfully ignoring burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactor power plants. Small Modular Reactors [SMRs] are the future of nuclear power in the UK and the first BWRX-300 will be operational in 2028 at a cost 60% below that of ''big nuclear''. 3 or 4 years after that, they will be available at a cost of 452 million each. 144 of them would supply all of the UK''s 340 TWh of electricity - in the low-carbon, 24/7 form - every year, for 60 years, at a cost of 65 billion. A reasonably ''sensible'' mix of onshore and offshore wind, solar and CCGT backup would cost 8X more - 527 billion! This tells all of the CCC-lead, renewable-fantasists all they need to know about the tragic waste of precious material resources and the associated fossil-fuelled energy that needs to go into their nightmare vision of a 100% renewables UK. A nightmare 8X the cost; 20X to 30X the resource use; 100X the scenic desecration, ecosystem destruction and species wipe-out. Search for: the 100% uk low-carbon electricity gold medal

Navigating the ULEZ as a small London business - Jonathan Hampson's blog

Poll saying "47% saying they would use their car less as a result". I wonder. basically if you have almost any petrol car, or a recent diesel, the ULEZ is an irrelevance. Likewise, if you live in the suburbs, and rarely if ever drive into central London, again it''s an irrelevance even if you drive an older diesel that would e subject to the charge. So for the vast majority of London car owners, it is unlikely to affect them. And I personally doubt that this will cause that majority to change behaviour and use their cars less, just because some older cars in inner London may be subject to a significant daily charge. When the zone is extended in 2021, it may begin to bite - but until then, I''d be surprised. That''s not to denigrate the Zipcar model which is an excellent way of (a) ensuring that people use lower emission vehicles and (b) reducing overall miles driven (people relying on shared cars are more likely to consider & use public transport), but I don''t think that the ULEZ will have an enormous short-term effect.

Corbyn launches bid to declare a national climate emergency

Fine words butter no parsnips... If I genuinely believed that passing a motion declaring a climate emergency would achieve anything, I''d be all for it. But the time for words has passed 0 we desperately need action from the Government (and an opposition that is prepared to be constructive, rather than reducing everything to an attempt to force an early general election). Sorry, but I see this as a cynical ploy to jump onto the Attenborough-Grunberg bandwagon.

Decarbonisation by 2050 can be achieved at 'very low cost'

@Mike Parr - My interpretation of the words "low cost" means "low marginal cost compared to Business As Usual". So it''s not looking at the actual interest rates or expected returns on capital, but is asking the question about how much it will cost to go for zero carbon compared to (say) replacing coal with CCGT when generation assets reach the end of their useful life. So while I think it is certainly possible that we could reach net zero carbon by 2045 or 2050, I don''t believe it will be without a significant cost, although the combined cost of interventions to achieve net zero carbon may well be lower than BAU + adaptation costs from following BAU. My concern is that this second cost equivalence only works if there is a global drive to reduce emissions, for otherwise we will end up with having both mitigation and adaptation costs (and in total, I doubt that they will be "low"!) I completely agree that we need both Government intervention and the market - we cannot afford to waste time (and money) on failed market-led initiatives such as the Green Deal.

Decarbonisation by 2050 can be achieved at 'very low cost'

Turner in common with many commits a category error in the use of the word "cost" and the phrase "low cost". It is generally accepted that to de-carb the elec power sector the UK will need to build out renewables. These will be a mix of on-shore & off-shore wind and PV. In the case of utility-scale systems all three categories are +/- at wholesale parity. The large-scale build out of RES will require large-scale deployment of capital. There are exactly two sources of capital: government money, private sector money. The former can be at an interest rate decided by government, the latter by whatever is "the going rate". Thus the "cost" of the build out is the cost of capital - which could range from fractions of a % to 4 or 5% or more. This leaves an open question for Mr Turner (a former banker) by using the phrase "very low cost" is he implying that the capital investment needed should be from government (since obviously this would be "very low cost"). Or is he implying that the commercial banking sector has suddenly grown a conscience and decided to offer "very low cost" interest rates for the RES build out? In the case of the expansion of the elec power network, obviously this requires capital, whilst at the same time, the DNOs owning the assets demand a return on these assets that is anything but "very low cost" - current rates of return being 5% - which is a wonderful return for a monopoly asset/service. I understand that Ofgem is currently waving its arms on the subject: however it is unclear if it is waving or drowing - probably the latter given its performance over the last 20 odd years. As for certainty, I can state with certainty that given current rates of build out for RES and current pathetic rates of energy renovation of the UK''s built environment. net-zero by 2050 will NEVER be achieved. So much for Turner & his la la land statements.

Moat Homes launches 'Energiesprong' retrofit pilot to create zero carbon houses

What is needed is legislation to ensure all new builds are to PassivHaus standard. Or am just being naive?

Moat Homes launches 'Energiesprong' retrofit pilot to create zero carbon houses

"The Energiesprong approach upgrades homes with a new exterior, fitting the outside of the building with new walls, windows, a solar roof and new electrical heating systems. Moat Homes has installed roof-mounted solar PV, battery systems, airtight wall-mounted panels, new energy efficient pitched roofs and MVHR (Mechanical Ventilation with Heat Recovery) units to heat and ventilate the buildings. New triple-glazed windows and new electric cookers have also been added to the properties". And the cost per house ???? Richard Phillips

Moat Homes launches 'Energiesprong' retrofit pilot to create zero carbon houses

Wouldn''t need to do this if ALL new build housing in the UK was built to the highest energy efficiency standards, such as PassivHaus. There is no excuse for poor energy efficiency today, especially poor insulation as it is heating that is the largest expense for all households regardless of the method of actual heating. However it is good to see that someone is at least looking at cost effective ways to reduce energy wastage in pre-existing properties. The key wording is "cost effective" though as it is hard for most households to justify or afford several thousands up front with a payback time in the range of decades.

Salt-based energy storage and Adidas' recyclable sneakers: The best green innovations of the week

The explanation of the science involved is far from satisfactory, and remains so even in the SaltX explanation in Google Richard Phillips

UK must prepare for 'inevitable changes' of climate risks, warns advisers

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From Brexit to behaviour change: edie launches quarterly 'Business Barometer' for energy managers

It's time to turn off the tap - The Helistrat blog

It will take a cultural attitude shift away from "disposable" before we really see any massive changes but the early signs are there. My local coffee shop does not have any take out cups at all. They have reusable cups for sale or if you don''t want one of them you can take a proper cup and return it or failing that wash it and give it to a charity shop (where they got them from in the first place). Some people just don''t get the concept and demand a paper/plastic throwaway cup still but the numbers who go "oh that''s a cool idea" are increasing. Business can help by stopping providing disposable products. Why do we need a plastic bottle of water in a restaurant when a jug of tap water is fine and reusable. Don''t give me the option on cups if I ask for a sit in drink just give it me in a proper cup. One company I worked for in the past actually gave every employee/consultant/contractor an insulated mug to use at the coffee machine. This was 10+ years ago but now the same company only has throwaway cups with plastic lids - why? It''s cheaper that''s why. There is much more we can do with recycling but it does not stop there. Think of all the other RE''s, such as REduce, REclaim, REpurpose etc etc and let''s all play our part in ending the scourge of the disposable.

Salt-based energy storage and Adidas' recyclable sneakers: The best green innovations of the week

Salt Energy Storage certainly sounds interesting. One wonders if this could be a future use of the old salt mines or even coal mines. Hyper insulated tanks of salt stored underground where temperature fluctuations are minimal. Could bring much needed investment and jobs to these areas. Could something similar also be done at the old Longannet Power Station site in Scotland? Infrastructure is already there in the form of the transformers, power lines etc and the site is still sitting unused. Transform a once dirty power station into a bright, new clean power storage station. Be interesting to see how this technology develops

How have key MPs responded to Greta Thunberg and the climate protests?

Claire Perry you advise children to go back to school where even a 16 year old would take 12 years to become a qualified geo-physisist! The world has 11 years before earth shattering change is predicted by 97% of scientists including David Attenborough! You recently made a comment on LBC about not telling people to stop eating red meat. You clearly like way too many Conservatives do NOT get it! You are more interested in vote buying with your way too old voters, and the party''s total lack of appeal to the under 45s! Theresa May empty chair while all other leaders met her says it all! The UK Government does not care about young people and the most important issue without exception. I am not a protestor, I''m 57 and would never vote again for the ignorance shown by Conservatives and especially your Government!

Bristol saves ?1m a year from 20,000 upgraded streetlights

Why waste precious and limited financial resources to cause annoyance to others? They cause disruption to our sleep.....We have explained to you people time and time again, so your blatant arrogance in ignoring the unfair light glare left on, blasting into people''s bedroom windows night after night after night could be more costly in the long run. Think about this logic. LED lights are a real nuisance to ordinary hard working people who have to get up the next morning and do a hard days work after being sleep disrupted all night long with these stupid glare bomb lights. But our tolerance will not go on forever. It just won''t............Personal injury claims galore....kerching! You know, that kerching sounds just like another LED light being busted....ahem.....It''s kind like this = Well Sir, I know Naaaa-thing!

How have key MPs responded to Greta Thunberg and the climate protests?

Why have you ignored the Liberal Democrats>? Both Vince Cable and Layla Moran were involved in meetings with Greta. Further the Lib Dem Party has done more to fight climate change than any other party. Ed Davy was in charge of the Department of Energy and Climate change when the UK had its greatest investment in renewable energy and was leading the EU Council on climate matters during much of the planning of the EU position for COP 21. Was it simply because the Lib Dems were already fighting climate change before Greta came on the scene?

'You did not act in time': Greta Thunberg's full speech to MPs

Sustainable strategies: Learning from the (many) mistakes of Brexit - Matt Mace's blog

my neighbour informed me that she had not met with or known anyone that voted to leave the eu. a friend informed me that he would vote with the majority of professional ie your sustainability people who voted not to leave. friends who live in a 10 bed house and holiday internationally annually thought that only idiots voted to leave ? A belgium analyst friend toured the uk before the vote and forecast the result he also pointed to surveys that indicated the uk was unique in not being afraid of invasion. A german MP said that his country would never allow uk bexit type negotiations as they were illogical. an analysis of 28 country leaving negotiations concluded that they were a priori unlikely to succeed. so if you are a successful person you vote to stay if not you vote to leave and a proud swedish lady told me her country would never all a vote as the less well off cannot be trusted ? makes you want to emigrate to australia

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

The tail of big business indeed! The interest in wind farms is not the generation of "green" electricity, but lucrative profit. Since the withdrawal of subsidies for new build wind turbines, none have been built; in spite of planning permission for hundreds being passed. Back in 1989, Mrs T terminated our leading nuclear industry. All nuclear work at Harwell was terminated at a weeks notice. Hundreds of professional scientists and chartered engineers were given early retirement. "If we need new reactors, the Market will provide them, no need for us to design them" Just so, Wylfa and Moorside take note. Richard Phillips

JLL 'on track' for 100% renewables target by 2020

2% reduction on its own footprint is hardly credible target. Simply buying REC''s doesn''t account for actual hard reductions within the operating envelope of any business or building. Great coat tail stories of its clients initiatives & ideas and publishing as their own.

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Richard That would pretty much go for anyone in parliament or position of legislative authority. The tail of big business wags the dog! Ben

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Just a little addendum. Re Claire Perry. She is a Geographer. We have never had a minister responsible for any energy related affairs with any graduate qualification in the physical sciences. Yet they still hold forth in their ignorance, and specifically refuse any offer of technical advice. For myself, former ARIC., FRIC., 35 years as a scientist at AERE Harwell, I do pretend to know just a little about it. We need saving from the green green amateurs! Richard Phillips

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

This is merely a reflection of demand, and the policy to give pride of place to unreliable, intermittent, expensive and land consuming renewables. The former grid met demand by bringing in generation in order of increasing costs, and reducing it in a similar fashion. It was all well under control. Without fossil fuel or nuclear power, the chaotic generation of renewables would be impossible to handle. As it is the costs of incorporating it in the grid is enormous, so embarrassingly so that National Grid will not divulge anything about the costs of subsidies or others unique to renewables (cabling, frequency, voltage and phase correction etc). The public is taken for a ride!! Both John and Ben are spot on. Richard Phillips

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

The Cumbrian mine is coking coal to replace imports, not for energy

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Still just point in time measurements of coal percentages., Even today bright sunshine outside but still the grid is supported by 3.8% with coal power. I still roll my eyes at these outlandish claims of coal free power.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

So A hydrogen fuel cell stack and associated systems costs around 13 times the price of an equivalent powered diesel engine. We have a long way to go before we will have an economic truck that runs on hydrogen fuel cell. Then there is the hydrogen storage issues and weight of the unit to consider against The legislation on the weight of a tractor unit or a rigid truck. Finally There is the issue of vibration and its affect on a fuel cell stack. Much still to do.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

So A hydrogen fuel cell stack and associated systems costs around 13 times the price of an equivalent powered diesel engine. We have a long way to go before we will have an economic truck that runs on hydrogen fuel cell. Then there is the hydrogen storage issues and weight of the unit to consider against The legislation on the weight of a tractor unit or a rigid truck. Finally There is the issue of vibration and its affect on a fuel cell stack. Much still to do.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

I don''t know about the efficacy, but there is a huge volume of waste such as plastics, and especially tyres, that are being produced and exist in millions of tonnes in waste dumps, as well floating in our waterways and oceans. This type of high temperature reduction is a good way of cleaning up this waste stream and making it safe, as well as removing existing pollution. Hydrogen has lots of potential and especially for heavy vehicles like trucks and trains, and, perhaps, shipping. Electrical power via batteries may well be the answer for lighter vehicles but hydrogen powered systems seems like a good option across all transport areas.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

Big question is how much energy is this process actually going to take to produce the 1 tonne of Hydrogen? And how much "pollution" from the process? If it is net energy positive, ie more energy from the Hydrogen than it took to produce it, and there is minimal atmospheric pollution from the process then this could be a very valuable addition to the waste and energy system. But if it takes more energy (electricity) than you get back then cut out the middle man and just use the electricity direct. However I am all for new and innovative solutions to both our waste management problems and our desire for cleaner energy but they must be truly accounted and be truly clean

The trends transforming mobility's future - The McKinsey blog

A rather US-centric view, especially in the final section on shared mobility, which should be a whole lot more than just ridesharing. Improved connectivity around public transport, including more real time information on matters such as delays (already quite good for trains) and train seat (or bike rental) availability is likely to have a bigger impact on the future of mobility than "miniature holographic waiters".

Amazon to support three major new wind power projects

Just a couple of points ; "and deliver 1229MW of power to Amazon annually" MW is a measure of the RATE of delivery of power. It is analogous to the speed of a car; MWh is analogous to the distance covered. Unless the difference between MW and MWh is clearly understood by writers on energy matters, reporting will be confused and erroneous. I note that Senator Jerry Hill graduated in Law, not physics. Claims of the use of "green" energy can only be credible if the total use claimed by customers can be matched to the amount generated at the time of use. If the amount generated at any moment is less that that being generated, the balance is being filled by conventional generation. Richard Phillips

Renewable energy could meet 86% of global power demand by 2050, IRENA concludes

86% of electricity needs if transportation is electrified but what about if heating is included in that calculation? I could easily provide all my electricity needs for my house with a 2kw array on the roof but to heat the house and provide all my hot water with electricity? That''s 2 orders of magnitude more panels and a few hectares of land needed to replace the 3 cubic metres of heating oil I currently use annually. That''s the crunch issue for renewables. How do we heat our homes, business, schools, hospitals etc without burning things (gas, oil, biomass etc) and how do we do it without hammering the bills? Oil costs 5p per kwhr, gas 4p. My electricity tariff is 15p per kwhr so 3 times as much to heat my house and hot water if I electrify. That''s a big ouch in anyone''s wallet.

Government urged to focus on lifecycle emissions as part of net-zero target

No point in developing something just because it sounds "green" when the overall net impact might be huge. Biomass is a case in point. When you factor in the volume of fuel oil used to ship wood pellets across the Atlantic just to burn them in a power station it sounds "green" but add in the hundreds of cubic metres of oil and suddenly it''s not. A cubic meter of concrete is a tonne of CO2, do we factor that into the green credentials of wind turbines? Add in the CO2 released when you dig up peat moorland and it is even worse. Hydrogen sounds green as the resultant waste product is water and you can reuse that to make more but water vapour is even more potent as a greenhouse gas than CO2, so burning H2 in central heating systems might actually make things worse than burning CH4. Especially if to make the H2 you crack CH4. At the end of the day the equation has got to add up and result in as low an impact as reasonably practicable. Sometimes that may mean the low carbon option might actually be what we are doing right now but with a minor tweak to improve the efficiency.

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Richard Spot on, these think tanks amount to nothing more than w@$k tanks of business mans hopes and dreams. We need actual people of common sense and a robust time spent in electrical engineering industry to even comment on these initiatives or even grasp the concepts of energy systems. All I''ve seen is my companies power bills increase by 30% in the last 4 years but the whole sale price is falling. These taxes are going where I ask the Government ? Ben

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Absolutely right, Ben. All these schemes are devices to make money. They sound wonderful to the totally uninitiated. We have to remember that we have never had a Minister, with responsibility for energy, who has any career involving the essential physical sciences. A degree in classics or economics, does not tell the holder much about electricity generation. But politicians have to appear all knowledgeable, and businessmen must make money. The huge Li-ion battery at Swindon will be 50MW, 50MWh, one twentieth of a normal power station for one hour, cost ~ 25 million. Just scale it up! Renewable energy is so unreliable, and the ancillary systems to make it compatible with demand-lead generation, that the costs have to be hidden; just lumped into your bill, un-itemised. And we do not have a satisfactory explanation for the vaunted importance of CO2 on global warming. A lot of jumping, shouting and waving of flags by schoolchildren, who know it all, of course. O for sanity! Richard Phillips

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Looks like another government pink elephant project. Id love to see the due diligent report into the viability of these claims. This is much like the Tesla battery in South Australia, can only run everyone''s TV for 30mins before going flat. Battery storage will need 2.5x the renewable generation and storage capacity to even come close to taking up the UK''s demand. Essentially a recouping revenue streams for the struggling energy generators as they want the power price to increase through the perceived energy crisis that the Green parties have created.

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

To be clever with the distribution of electricity, it has first to be generated, but Government policies are in total disarray. It then has to be distributed, a whole technology in itself. Only then can the talking shop chatter about virtual power plants (?) and "super hubs". From the article I have still have very idea of what, exactly, they are. And I have the impression that they are little more than paper giants. Nowhere can I find the cool hand of the experienced Chartered Electrical Engineer. Richard Phillips

Shrinking renewables sector dealt further blow with Renewables Obligation closure

We have the ability to generate 215kw / day from a micro generator, however there is zero incentive to buy this, we currently burn logs and oil. If anyone knows if there is a way to export this back to the grid and receive some payment then great let us know. Unfortunately there is zero incentive to invest in any form of green or renewable energy now!

Nestl? set to launch its first plastic-free packaging in 2019

Innovative Solution Systems (ISS) is the sole agency responsible for the promotion and distribution of waste-to-energy equipment (manufactured by Biomass Energy Systems Inc. (BESI) in the West African Sub-Region. The objective of ISS is to promote the use of waste to energy technology in Ghana and the entire West African Sub-Region to ensure energy sustainability and clean environmental. We are sincerely looking forward to assisting Ghanaian and Africans making sustainable environmental and economic changes to the current infrastructure. We have made great strides in providing similar support, providing solutions to waste and energy issues for our clients in Costa Rica and India. We know that our capabilities and responsible and practical approach will be ideal for what you are striving to achieve in Africa. BESI is a Woman Owned Business Enterprise, located outside of Chicago, Illinois. We are providing solutions to issues regarding waste management and alternative energy to a wide variety of stakeholders, as well as developing the supporting training and university curriculum. We have provided extensive support for the United States military, working towards zero- landfill bases, providing waste assessment, custom designed turnkey systems, and delivering significant performance data. We currently have two facilities owned by the USAir Force that are managed by BESI which support the US military research into materials conversion and baseload renewable energy at utility and battlefield scale. We have additional facilities operating and in construction at our India offices, which have tremendous environmental significance for their entire industrial base, cleanly converting wastes and producing steam for use onsite, reducing operating costs for local industries. This is an economically sustainable strategy for the entire region. BESI would endeavor to provide a similar strategic and beneficial approach to the areas of Ghana in which we work The patented gasification process used by BESI is the TURNW2E Advanced Gasification system. Gasification is the process by which a material undergoes exothermic and endothermic reactions within a vessel and harvests the gaseous material it emits- generally undertaken to provide energy. BESI s process is customized to client requirements and delivered as a turnkey solution for our clients. A turnkey system consists of the four-step process of preprocessing/shredding, gasification, gas cleanup, and gas utilization, with each unit integrated and optimized for maximum output. Using the BESI design and deliver approach, Africa factories and industrial concerns will be able to gasify much of their waste to produce the best value alternative energy output, which can include water desalination, air conditioning, cold storage, hot water, heat, steam, or electricity. A key differentiating feature of BESI s process is its flexibility. The system can be scaled from 5 TPD to 100 TPD, and can be designed to reliably operate at lower volumes, as needed, by the location requirements. Materials of different densities are readily accommodated, as the system can change and control reactions called shift-on-the-fly to maximize conversion efficiency. As a general rule of thumb, our systems can convert 100 TPD of 7000 btu/lb waste and convert it into 3 MW/h of energy. Modules of 100 TPD can be supplied to accommodate volumes over 500 TPD. Typical simple payback can range from one to seven years, depending upon the client requirements and economic strategy employed. The system does not emit any harmful emissions or particulates. Everything in our turnkey systems is engineered with environmental well-being in mind, as well as providing an economically sustainable solution to waste management and energy generation. BESI has successfully supported clients working on projects funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Currently, a project in Costa Rica is moving ahead, with the USAID providing pre-development funding to BESI s client. This project will have BESI deliver a complete design, turnkey system and installations and operations support for 100 TPD of wastes and an additional 40 TPD of tires. BESI will support your group as needed for similar efforts, with the expectation of tremendous success in Africa. https://spark.adobe.com/page/wV2rF6TNws1dx/?fbclid=IwAR1VZd40RFnIAsadgMnxserkXMOPeju1SuoamqzcUFwyGkBsVlrHfKgi6Ww

How are big oil and gas firms approaching the low-carbon transition?

Ian, the 45% came from an infographic produced by the API (American Petroleum Institute) a few years ago so could well be out of date but the fact that oil has many more uses than just burning is still true though regardless of the actual % Modern life relies on petrochemicals and petroleum based products. Yes some may be replaceable with biological alternatives at some point but not all. That isn''t going to change overnight so the oil industry will still be hunting for and developing new reserves of oil (and gas) for a long time and we will continue to do it in as environmental sensitive manner as we possibly can, which contrary to popular belief we do do.

Policy needed to solve the 'Rubik's cube' of energy storage

The energy has to be generated in the first place. Converting it to another form involves losses due to inevitable inefficiencies. Further losses are incurred in the reverse process. Energy has also to be deployed in driving the processes, as well as the overhead cost of the plant involved. It can all be made to sound wonderful to those without the scientific and technical understanding of the processes involved. And this circumstance is not unusual in the political and business sectors. Richard Philips

Tesco to trial plastic-to-oil innovation which makes all packaging 'recyclable'

Interesting technological response to the plastic problem. Turning currently un recycled waste back into the raw material to make new products is a step forward in the drive to reduce waste. Be very interesting to see how the trial goes and I hope consumers embrace the idea of bringing stuff back to the retailer rather than relying on kerbside collection.

Sustainable strategies: Learning from the (many) mistakes of Brexit - Matt Mace's blog

How appropriate, that''s probably the most important thing anyone has written about both Brexit & for that matter Sustainability/Sustainable Development Thank you very much & I hope you''re similarly sending it to not only No 10 & Parliament but also your fellow journalists

How are big oil and gas firms approaching the low-carbon transition?

Keiron, I don''t think that''s right. According to the US Government Agency, the EIA, in the USA in 2017 on average 47% was motor gasoline (includes ethanol), 20% was distillate fuel (heating oil and diesel fuel), and 8% was jet fuel. The balance was used for fuel oils for heating and electricity generation; asphalt and road oil; and feedstocks for making the chemicals, plastics, and synthetic materials. By my reckoning at least 75% is burned one way or another. See https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=41&t=6. In Europe we tweak the barrel to produce more middle distillate (diesel) and less petrol. The fraction that goes to chemicals may be a little higher in NW Europe (Rotterdam and Antwerp in particular), but globally I wouldn''t expect them to be much different from the US figures.

How are big oil and gas firms viewing the low-carbon transition?

What you have to remember is only 45% of a barrel of oil goes to fuel. The remainder goes to the petrochemical industry to make the millions of everyday products our modern life demands and needs. From pharmaceuticals to lipstick, plastic to synthetic clothing, medical equipment to mobile phones. Burning it may decrease but people like me will still be heading out into the worst Mother Nature can throw at us to find and develop the raw material all these things are made of for years to come.

Battery storage and solar farms to power 100 UK 'Electric Forecourts'

"industrial-scale solar farms and a 27MW battery storage facility" To quote the power which a facility can supply, without quoting its capacity, MWhours, is of little meaning. Can it supply power at 27MW for ten minutes or the hours????? Understand the units!!!!!! Richard Phillips

One hour, no power: Millions of kWh of energy to be saved as landmarks switch off for Earth Hour

Why not put a timer switch on all these lights so they automatically switch off at midnight? Does any building need to be floodlit all night? Offices should have systems to shut down lights and equipment outside of office hours or when there is no activity in the building. Automatic sensors can turn on "security" lighting when the guards make their rounds or if motion is detected. Billions of kwh are wasted every single minute of every single hour of every day of the year. A small change every minute builds up rather than some daft symbolic gesture that does nothing in the long term. As the ARP Wardens used to shout "Turn that bloody light off!"

In charts: The UK's record-breaking year for low-carbon energy generation

The same old TWhours. It is the hours that give it away, the bundled up parcel, not whether they were generated when they were needed. All renewable electricity is generated as and when nature chooses, NOT at all necessarily when we need it. And it is difficult and expensive to store on an industrial scale. Hydro storage is limited by our geography. Batteries will never be cheap enough to be really economic on an industrial scale, and they wear out. A multiplicity of mechanical devices are little more than expensive toys. Without gas turbine backup to the full extent of the deployed wind potential, turbines are NOT a secure energy supply. Indeed only last June the whole 20GW potential was reduced to less than 1GW for more than five days, over 120 hours!!! Gas turbines simply met demand. Wind turbines are not installed to generate electricity, they generate MONEY, at sea they still do, as they are built. On land, new turbines are not subsidised. In spite of a hundred and more approved planning applications, none have been built. In spite of claims of how cheaply they generate electricity; one might have thought with such generators there would be a rush to build and connect to the Grid???? I don''t think that Ms Pinchbeck has it quite correct. But correct technical evaluation must come from a technical background. This is not the case for all policy makers in administrative roles. And especially, perhaps, politicians. A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, specially to the country. Richard Phillips

Why General Mills want supply chains to become regenerative stewards of the environment

Sounds like a real wake up call for General Mills. Late but a wake up call none the less. Soil health regeneration will be a big task for predominately monoculture or arable operations though.

CCC calls for stamp duty and winter fuel payment reform to help decarbonise homes

Why not just make it easier for all households to (slowly but surely) replace fossil fuel based heating systems with cleaner, more efficient and ideally non fossil fuel systems. I have an A rated Oil Fired Condensing Boiler for my wet heating system, it is 2 years old but eventually I will have to replace it. But what with? I''m not going to install Underfloor Heating or a Ground Source Heat Pump as it is simply too expensive ( 18k plus for GSHP) and if I switch to an electric boiler (simplest) I will see my energy bills jump by a factor of 3 as electricity is 3x the price per kw-hr as oil or gas. All of a sudden I am energy poor despite thoroughly insulating my home (at my expense with no government assistance). What alternative systems are available to me? What grants or support are available? If we really want to decarbonise heating then affordable options MUST be available to all households not just those on benefits or the so called energy poor.

BNEF: Battery storage costs have 'plummeted' in past year

There is a widespread belief which this article fosters, that "green" technology is actually clean and therefore is in some way, more moral and deserving of uncritical support than coal, oil and gas. This is certainly the case with the (wonderful) lithium ion battery and its much hyped use, on a TWh scale, in grid storage. TWh-scale storage will certainly be needed if intermittent renewable energies are to contribute anything more than a very small fraction of the energy needed by the World''s burgeoning population. In fact, the cost of the lithium ion battery depends increasingly on the cost of the materials of which it is composed, as the costs of its manufacture in vast giga-factories heads toward an asymptote. At https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05752-3, you will read a carefully researched paper on the facts of life as regards the availability of the relatively scarce metals needed. In Deutsche Welle''s well researched documentary "The true cost of electric cars" (https://www.dw.com/en/the-true-cost-of-electric-cars/av-46457917 ), you will see a small fraction of the appalling damage to the environment already caused by mining lithium in the Atacama desert at only the start of global EV manufacturing. Furthermore, as you must know already, 50 years after the invention of the lithium ion battery, there is not a single, commercially viable process anywhere in the world, that can recycle these at the end of their relatively short lives, no matter which battery chemistry is used. By "commercial", I mean a process that can deliver the metals used in their manufacture as economically as freshly mined metals at the (usually Chinese) refinery where the mined metals are refined to the purity needed to make these incendiary batteries safe. I would welcome Edie''s corrections, if I am wrong! No! lithium ion batteries are not about to

'I certainly didn't do it for sales': Iceland boss sheds fresh light on palm oil phase-out

If you look at companies like Unilever, with its massive profits, it could easily use the old alternatives to #palmoil. But will not, because it puts profits before people and planet. The WWF, is at fault as well, as it knew about the problems in 2005, but continued to support a failed certification system. That is why, I no longer support the #wwf.