Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Coronavirus and plastics: Are we headed back towards single-use?

I think the key point in all this is the line "system they operate in is broken". This is very true as the problem is not the plastic itself but the method(s) of collection, processing and disposal of plastic that is the problem. That and lazy humans dropping plastic on the side of a street or throwing it in a bush. Plastic is a wonder material; lightweight, inert, resilient. A 1 litre plastic bottle weighs significantly less than its glass counterpart for instance. However why can''t we take our 1 litre plastic fruit juice bottle back to the supermarket for it to be cleaned, sterilised and refilled? Why when there are so many different kinds of plastic do we not have a recycling stream for every single type? Why are we still allowing food manufacturers to use mixed plastic packaging? We have to reduce unnecessary plastic but at the same time we must not "throw baby out with the bathwater" and end up with a worse situation by changing materials just because of a perception that plastic is bad. Glass bottles weigh more so take more energy to transport than plastic bottles, this all has to be taken into account before we "knee jerk" react.

WBA: Companies with embedded sustainability best-placed to weather coronavirus storm

Can you give advice to a business which is totally committed to social and environmental responsibility, but which sells gifts, mostly not necessities, in a global economy where there is so much inequality, and where the whole basis of trade is threatened as it is with Covid-19? Relationships with suppliers may be excellent, the products fairly traded and sustainable, but is this enough?

Carbon pricing, flexibility and scaling-up hydrogen: UK energy sector unveils net-zero innovation pl

I see this piece is written by Sarah George. I wish she understood that electricity and hydrogen are not sources of energy, but ways of moving it around. Understanding that, she might be a bit more critical of these pronouncements. Where does the electricity come from? Wind, solar and nuclear. The first two are unreliable, and use a lot of (fossil fuel) energy to create. Very low EROEI. Nuclear is expensive but reliable and long lived. Sadly, under a cloud for the wrong reasons. SMRs are a real alternative. Hydrogen comes from water - brilliant, no CO2! But you need energy to extract it from the water, and that means fossil fuels. Even the CCC recognised that and said carbon capture and storage is essential to reach net zero carbon by 2050. Can we please put some numbers in these articles and a little more scepticism about how easy it is to achieve? Ever looked at how long the biggest battery in the world - Elon Musk''s one in S Australia - would last in a blackout? Serving domestic premises only, it could keep S Australia going for 2.57 minutes. Just about long enough for a CCGT blackstart to generate electricity from ??? fossil fuels...

The transition to carbon-neutral gas - Climate responsibilities into positive outcomes

How verifiable is carbon offsetting? If an estate installs a heat pump (zero-carbon emissions) which is in turn powered by power from a zero-carbon source it''s probably fair to say that''s a zero-carbon system, although even that is open to challenge if we take a holistic view. Is carbon offsetting a legitimate way to get an organisation to become net zero-carbon or is it clever accounting? I don''t know. I''m asking...

In numbers: Tracking coronavirus' impact on energy and the environment

Autopsies in China reveal that the victims had drowned of phlegm in the lungs. The UK Labour Government "Cobra" in 2009 gave this advice to those with swine flu: Simple Treatments for Colds, Flu, and Pneumonia To summarise: 1) Breath deeply all day to prevent aching muscles which could lead to death. 2) Roll on your side to cough up a lung at a time of mucus, to prevent drowning. 3) Go to bed an hour earlier to increase your energy that you will need to fight with tomorrow. 4) Imagine doing exercises to increase muscle mass because your body will be using your muscles as energy. 5) Stay warm. Pass it on.

WBA: Companies with embedded sustainability best-placed to weather coronavirus storm

Autopsies in China reveal that the victims had drowned of phlegm in the lungs. The UK Labour Government "Cobra" in 2009 gave this advice to those with swine flu: Simple Treatments for Colds, Flu, and Pneumonia To summarise: 1) Breath deeply all day to prevent aching muscles which could lead to death. 2) Roll on your side to cough up a lung at a time of mucus, to prevent drowning. 3) Go to bed an hour earlier to increase your energy that you will need to fight with tomorrow. 4) Imagine doing exercises to increase muscle mass because your body will be using your muscles as energy. 5) Stay warm.

'Burnt and dumped': Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Unilever and Nestl? plastics waste fuelling climate change

It should also be a requirement that all domestic cleaners including shampoo and shower products are sold in 500ml containers rather than 250, 330 and 400ml. The additional plastic in the container would be perhaps 10% for up to 100% increase in product volume. Significant reduction in plastic use for very little effort.

BNEF: Green hydrogen could slash energy, transport and industry emissions by one-third

Produce hydrogen gas at 0.64- 1.30 per kg in 2050?? It currently costs 7.00 per kg @commercial energy prices. (there abouts 0.0145 pence kWh). It takes approx 48kWh of electrical energy to produce 1kg of hydrogen through electrolysis. So unless your''re producing hydrogen at 100% efficiency (never) and you''re buying power at 0.010 pence in 2050 ???? All renewable generation would have to be circa 5 x the actual country demand to produce any quantity of Hydrogen based on current laws thermodynamics. Hydrogen in concentrations of greater 10 to 15% mixed in with natural gas network can causes steel to become brittle in pipe work and boilers. Gas leak ? more than likely.. This Hydrogen economy isn''t counting the cost of the fuel cells to produce electricity as they are full of precious metals, nearly doubling the price of a small car, let alone the lay over infrastructure on top of natural gas network. All of this wouldn''t even be spoken about if there wasn''t enough green cash subsidies to ''Make it look attractive'' to pipe dream investing.

Study: Climate-wrecking products 'should come with smoking-style warnings'

Interesting idea, but a health warning is rather a pass/fail type of approach. I''m not sure how much Joe Public would take notice of it. A mandatory carbon label, while only speaking to a smaller section of the public, graded on a red-amber-green traffic light system similar to some UK food labels, might however provide a better nudge to move from the worst carbon polluters to less bad ones.

One year on: How has the solar feed-in-tariff closure impacted renewables in the UK?

The problem with FIT was it was based on an assumption that you would export half of the rated power of your installation all the time. Blatantly absurd and meant you could get paid twice in effect if you used all your power as you''d save on the electricity you''d normally draw from the grid but also get paid for power you were not actually supplying. While the SEG isn''t perfect it is a fairer way to pay for actually power supplied to the grid based on what an installation actually does provide rather than an assumption. We all know what happens when you ASSUME, you make an ASS out of U and ME

BNEF: Green hydrogen could slash energy, transport and industry emissions by one-third

Renewable hydrogen will be able to be produced for $0.80-$1.60 ( 0.64- 1.30) by 2050 $0.80-$1.60 ( 0.64- 1.30) per ????

Green freebies for coronavirus heroes and California's clean energy boost: The sustainability succes

All wonderful But the energy has to come from somewhere; there are no free lunches. No coal, not gas, hydro has little if any further prospect, nuclear years away, renewables intermittent. Only nuclear left, but an uncertain future. A bit bleak!! Richard Phillips

Government presses forward with plan to align 'every single mode of transport' with net-zero

A new policy will, inevitably be written by, overwhelmingly, bureaucrats. Not a physical scientist in sight!! No mention is made of the problem of energy supply, the amount or the source!! To "decarbonise" the transport system, an alternative source of energy is needed. Only nuclear and renewables remain. Renewables are spasmodic and dilute. They thus require both large installations (on land or sea), and large storage facilities. Both are inconvenient. Nuclear generation is concentrated (as at present with fossil fuels), and constant in meeting demand. This leaves only nuclear if both a reliable and demand lead system is required. We have no economic hydro sources left. But whose looking!! When the penny drops we shall be at least ten years too late, and, and the quick answer will be needed, GAS. Nuclear scares the boots off our politicians. Richard Phillips.

Government presses forward with plan to align 'every single mode of transport' with net-zero

This is typical DfT green wash. There is no indication in the report of any intention to reduce either road or aviation traffic. Indeed the opposite. This is the usual DfT predict and provide - more roads, more runways, more unnecessary journeys everywhere. We don''t have to worry about greenhouse gases because we can fantasise about technology solving all the problems. No plausible justification of these ambitions. Just like DfT fantasies about the economic benefits of mass travel. This is a fraudulent announcement.

Coronavirus: Seven key considerations for energy professionals

yes, its right that corona virus has effected everything whether its a vacuum chamber business, share market or domestic things. It effected the economy of the nation badly. this blog is really informational for energy professionals.

Coronavirus: Seven key considerations for energy professionals

Coronavirus: Seven key considerations for energy professionals

yes, its right that corona virus has effected everything whether its a vacuum chamber business, share market or domestic things. It effected the economy of the nation badly. this blog is really informational for energy professionals.

MP's pension fund still investing in fossil fuels

Caroline Lucas has a heart of gold, but lacks the technical knowledge of electricity generation. There is no natural source of the energy necessary to generate electricity, which is available on demand, at any time. This can only be provided by coal, gas or nuclear sources. All renewable sources are dependent upon the whims of nature. This is simply inadequate to meet our needs, and never will be adequate. It is a pipe-dream!! Until we have an adequate chain of reactors, sufficient to meet our electricity demand, with a margin to spare, we have to have fossil fuel, principally gas, for CCGT power plants. Full stop!! If the MP Pension fund does not invest in fossil fuel, other sources will, this self purification is simply self illusory. Richard Phillips

MP's pension fund still investing in fossil fuels

As I have said time and time again and will continue to shout from the rooftops "IT"S NOT JUST FUEL!" Hydrocarbons are the feedstock for millions of everyday products including all the VITAL LIFESAVING MEDICAL EQUIPMENT that is now so vital. Stop thinking in terms of burning oil and gas but think about what else they are used for and imagine a world without petrochemicals and synthetic clothing. What the Government do need to do though is end their cushy Diamond encrusted Final Salary Pension and switch to the same Defined Contribution schemes the vast majority of the rest of the country are on, that have just seen a 40-50% decrease in value.

Survey: How will coronavirus affect sustainability and energy professionals?

I would happily contribute but my work settings won''t permit me to sign into your survey via Microsoft login, apologies.

Survey: How will coronavirus affect sustainability and energy professionals?

I would like to participate but it says I do not have permission to view the form. Would you be able to assist?

Support for coronavirus-hit charities and biomethane trucks: The sustainability success stories of t

Am I correct in believing that signing up to renewable electricity only guarantees the best endeavours of the supplier to deliver from a renewable generator. If the sun is not shining, its night time, and the wind is not blowing, we are in the centre of a large high pressure area, from where does the power originate??? For all customers. Renewables simply cannot supply on demand all the time. If fossil fuels are debarred, only nuclear is left, and not a great deal is presently happening in that field.! Richard Phillips

Coronavirus: Now is not the time for environmental grandstanding - The reporter's blog

Very well put Sarah. William Thompson

UK's carbon footprint 21% below peak levels, latest Government figures show

As a statistical update to my last comment, analysis in the report shows that road transport emissions rose by 5% between 1997 and 2017. In the same period, the number of private cars registered with DVLA rose by 36.7% to 31.2 million. In contrast, the introduction of 5% bioethanol in petrol (and B7 biodiesel) will have had only a minor effect.

UK's carbon footprint 21% below peak levels, latest Government figures show

UK's carbon footprint 21% below peak levels, latest Government figures show

@Sophie Domestic travel is down or flat due to continuing improvements in efficiency (mpg) of cars and trucks, although this has levelled off over the past few years as it has been offset by a rise in the proportion of larger SUV-type private cars, as well as in the number local delivery vehicles with the move to online shopping. Private mileage has been more or less flat - miles driven per vehicle have dropped slightly, but have been offset by more cars on the road. Although more leisure trips by air have undoubtedly increased aviation emissions (more flights), I don''t believe that it has been directly responsible for the small drop in miles driven per vehicle - most people are taking additional breaks, rather than substituting Barcelona for Brighton.

UK's carbon footprint 21% below peak levels, latest Government figures show

Thanks for the piece. Do think the exclusion of aviation should be a headline - domestic travel down seems surprising and encouraging but then you realise it s substituted by air mini breaks and foreign hols?

Heavy-emitting firms 'off-track' to deliver low-carbon world

CO2 is always presented as if it were our major source of global heating. It seems to ignore variations in water vapour. This is assumed to be constant, but this is just too simple, having its origins, I suspect, in the difficulty in making measurements revealing any variations on the same scale as CO2 as a whole, about on one fortieth. has this ever been attempted, I wonder. CO2 has its place in atmospheric warming, but I doubt that it is dominant, and have never seen on a molecular scale, an explanation of just how it may be done. But there is a lot of HMG money being handed out on controlling CO2, the control of water vapour is orders of magnitude beyond us; just as well perhaps! Richard Phillips

Behaviour change: Tesco and RBS to discuss engagement strategies in edie's next webinar

Hello, The link to register does not work. Please can you review and share a link to register for this webinar? Thanks!

Patagonia and Surfdome trial removal of plastic polybags for clothes

The most important aspect of this is in the opening paragraph: "in a way that doesn''t impact product quality or generate an increase in lifecycle carbon emissions" It is vital that everything we do is fully costed in terms of emissions, resources, energy and waste so that we do not "Pave the Road to Hell with Good Intentions". Sometimes what appears on the surface to be a green or sustainable idea is in fact more damaging than what it replaces.

WRAP issues new guidance to target 3.6m tonnes of food wasted at farm level

good to see WRAP making progress on this, but part of the solution must be a collaborative supply chain approach. We''ve had a buyers'' market in fresh produce for too long, and we need to move to a more transparent joint effort to plan supplies and share risk. Grading specs also a key issue, along with better ways to use grade-outs for human food

Coronavirus vs. climate change and COP26: What happens next?

If it''s not one thing it''s another, but very seriously, what do the authors of the UN''s 26 November 2019 Emissions Gap Report say

UK Government funnels ?90m into electric scooters and delivery drones

Wouldn''t it be better to invest that money into E-Bikes, E-Cargo Bikes and E-Delivery vehicles? Upping the speed limit on e-bikes and lowering the age at which people can use them would have a big impact on their use and by electrifying local delivery networks would have a massive impact on air quality in towns and cities. E-Scooters are a blooming menace in many cities, just being left anywhere in Paris for instance, and drones, really what muppet came up with that idea?

Sir Robert McAlpine targets net-zero emissions by 2024

At least another 41% cut in CO2 emissions can be realised if we convert all houses and industries to near zero-carbon emissions. This does not have to be expensive. The cheapest and simplest method would be to paint the surfaces of all rooms with Starlite, invented by Maurice Ward; this would prevent heat escaping and so minimise heating requirements. As far as I am aware, the secret formula for Starlite was passed onto his immediate family members so has not been lost by his tragic death. Starlite can also prevent heat loss with attempts to store energy with molten salt, and Economy 7 radiators. If we can store all the excess capacity of electrical generation at night then we can cut the number of power stations needed so storage of energy is important. Maurice Ward Information See: https://www.starlitethermashield.com/ (This figure assumes that 80% of heating is by gas, and that domestic gas use is 29%, and industry heating is 22% of total energy consumption.) An alternative to Starlite is Firepaste, invented by Canadian Troy Hurtubise, we were looking for financial backing for lab time so that he could make a household paint out of it when he died, a great tragedy not only for friends and family, but for the environment as well. RIP. As both Maurice and Troy said that they made their inventions out of household products I am attempting to get a government lab set up to recreate their inventions. If you look at this YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqR4_UoBIzY you will find the the likely components are 90% corn starch and 10% baking soda mixed into a putty using PVA glue. There may have been other components as well, because it has been made into a spray paint, and paint. You will need to crack the formula in order to make use of passive temperature control of buildings. You might even be able to improve upon them both. Making traditional cement results in greenhouse gas emissions from two sources: it requires intense heat, and so a lot of energy to heat up the ovens that cook the raw material, such as limestone. That then releases further CO2 as it burns. Nikolaos Vlasopoulos, chief scientist at Novacem, says that cement based on magnesium silicates, not only requires much less heating, it also absorbs large amounts of CO2 as it hardens, making it carbon negative. According to Novacem, its product can absorb, over its life cycle, around 0.6 tonnes of CO2 per tonne of cement. This compares to carbon emissions of about 0.4 tonnes per tonne of standard cement.

Environmental net gain: An enduring development concept for resilient legacies - The Environmental I

Hi Thanks for sharing this interesting and important work. I can see the need to develop from BNG to ENG. But from the paper I couldn''t see how and if net zero was incorporated?

'A mixed picture': Key green economy figures react to the Budget's environmental provisions

Here''s the thing about roads and road investment; Electric Vehicles need roads as much as ICE vehicles. Public transport needs roads, delivery vehicles need roads, cyclists need roads, pedestrians need roads (well roadside pavements). If we don''t continue to maintain and invest in our road network then before long they will fall apart and travel will become almost impossible. That means your Amazon Prime deliveries will not come next day, your Deliveroo rider will bring you a scrambled meal and there will be no food in the supermarkets. Oh and lorries will not be able to transport components of wind farms and solar installations either. Investment in roads is NOT a bad thing it is an absolute necessity

'A national first': UK generates more electricity from renewables than gas

@ Richard - thank you for providing some numbers to back me up. From a screenshot from Gridwatch I can confirm at 02:40hrs on 8th July 2019 Wind was providing 1.60GW (7.5%) of demand with Gas via CCGT providing 10.62GW (49.8%) and Nuclear 4.83GW (22.63%) (add in French Nuclear via the Interconnector and Nuclear comes to 6.5GW or 30.6%).

'A national first': UK generates more electricity from renewables than gas

"In its latest renewables update, covering July-September 2019, the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) reveals that renewable electricity generation during the period was 28.8TWh, compared to 28.6TWh for gas" Above Sounds impressive "Wind alone comprised 19% of generation during the quarter". BUT in the period, from 7 July to 12 July, and the 15 to 17 .July, metered wind generation was down from a possible 9GW to IGW and near zero. Such uncontrollable generation has to compensated by very flexible gas generation (loss making!) Who can envisage such an uncontrollable source being our main source of power? POLITICIANS OF COURSE!!!!, encouraged by the wind industry, all for net zero, a totally unreal concept for the real world, domestic and industrial. Richard Phillips

Sustainable Business Covered podcast: An International Women's Day 2020 special

Great Playbook for Sustainability & Energy Professionals !

Does the Budget put the UK on course for net-zero emissions?

No. Why not? Too much reliance on CCS, not enough action on energy efficiency or transport, especially given the continuing large sums for road building. The money for buses is far too little to bring about the necessary sea-change to encourage most people to use them. And more should be done to discourage flying.

'A national first': UK generates more electricity from renewables than gas

Does this include the days when COAL was producing more electricity than Wind and Solar put together?

Green policies? Actions speak louder than words - The Ethex Blog

slept so far

Clean transport, CCS and biodiversity championed in Budget 2020

27 Billion to tarmac and concrete over the country, and no increase in fuel duty. Let''s not get excited about this government''s commitment to tackling the climate and ecological crises all around us. https://library.wmo.int/index.php?lvl=notice_display&id=21700#.Xmoliaj7SUk

'Another step towards net-zero': Anglian Water invests in onsite solar at key site

11.6 MW over 42,000 panels is about 276 Wp per panel, surely they''re using better panels than this? A 375 Wp panel would need about 31,000 panels to match the same array size. . reducing panel mounts and labour costs. Is someone having Anglian Water on or am I missing something?

The Heathrow domino: Is Government nearing the promised land of joined-up climate policy? - Matt Mac

The Court decision on the third runway at Heathrow failed to take into account emerging technology that will probably be introduced by 2050. For aircraft this means powering them with net zero carbon fuel which can be made by carbon capture of CO2 and green hydrogen using the Fisher-Troph process. This technology is not new, and the University of Karlsruhe has a container size demonstration unit to show it works. The other infrastructure projects such as better roads should not be impeded by ignorance of technologies to reduce carbon emissions to zero, such as hydrogen or electric powered vehicles when the electricity comes from zero carbon sources.

Clean transport, CCS and biodiversity championed in Budget 2020

I listened to Sunak''s speech and was impressed by his delivery and the content of the budget. However his decision to increase funding for biomass is misguided if the source of any wood pellets is not carbon neutral; at present a great deal comes from Canada, so if you factor in the environmental cost of growing, harvesting, processing and shipping the pellets to the UK, they are not carbon neutral. Also it is known that some people such as farmers, have installed large biomass boilers and run them outside releasing the heat into the air to profit from the present subsidy. Its a pity that Sunak did not mention hydrogen powered vehicles who''s technology is better suited to HGVs, trains and ships than pure battery, and will ultimately replace many EVs.

UK's net-zero target possible with 'unprecedented' low-carbon innovation

What happens when we have covered the entire country with solar panels, wind turbines and forest but emissions are still not Net Zero? Then what do we do? One thing every household and business can do right now which is simple and helps make for a better living environment is grow plants. Window boxes, hanging baskets, tubs, planters full of leafy green flowering plants or even delicious edible crops all help to clean the air we breathe and transform CO2 into biomass and Oxygen. Vertical gardens down the sides of buildings, roof top gardens on tower blocks it would all help "green" our environment. Then of course we can all reduce our energy wastage so we don''t need to generate quite so much. If the UK cut electricity demand by a paltry 10% we would not need to build Hinckley C (3.2GW). One of our biggest energy demands is streaming data which is estimated to produce more CO2 annually than aviation (4% vs 2% of global emissions) and set to double by 2040. We all do it, even now as I type this a server somewhere is eating power and kicking out heat, but we can reduce our data demand by downloading and storing regularly listened to music on our devices, or videos we watch over and over instead of streaming them over and over and over again. Sometimes little things really do have a cumulative difference

Lifecycle approach required: Government's plastics policies could triple UK packaging emissions

A classic example of "the Road to Hell being paved with Good Intentions" Until we factor in the total energy, resource and emission costs to everything this kind of thing will continue to happen. Another example is biomass wood pellets, are they truly "green" when you factor in the amount of petrol used for chainsaws, diesel for haulage and handling equipment then transportation from forest to sawmill (with associated wear and tear on roads), energy needed by the sawmill then transportation of pellets etc to final place of use. When pellets are shipped across oceans in large oil burning cargo ships they become even less green.

Creating a sustainable food system depends on a shared mentality as well as collaboration - The Peps

Great piece. A further sustainability challenge is that too many people are eating too much food and not helpful calories. What part do food and product manufacturers have in that element of sustainability? It impacts of course on quality of life, health systems, resources... Reduced consumption is more sustainable than the circular economy based on over-consumption...

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Absolutely, Ian; it isn''t. The problem we have is the almost universal ignorance of technical matters among MPs. Wind generation is presented to the Commons by the renewable lobby in terms of TWhours per year!!!! The MPs do not understand that this simple act, completely conceals the days every year, when all wind generation falls to near zero; enormously large area of high pressure settling over the whole country and the North Sea. If, as the Commons seems to call for, as recommended by the Infrastructure Commission (equally ignorant!), our power should be 50% renewable, wind, we shall suffer blackouts, even a black start. One event like that would take the country years to recover, forget 2008! This is little less than treason! See July 2019. Richard Phillips

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

To answer the question posed in the headline (Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?): No, it isn''t. All these are helpful, but as the comments below indicate, there are major issues around both biomethane and hydrogen. Good biomethane, from AD, can certainly be a positive contributor, but the maximum available supply would be minute compared to current demand for gaseous or liquid fossil fuels (natural gas , petrol, diesel...). Hydrogen is "interesting", but still largely at a research stage if we are to find carbon-efficient ways of producing and distributing it. And that leaves E10. Yes, it''s a quick win, but I prefer to think of it as F90 - 90% fossil fuel. moving from 5% to 10% ethanol will make an almost negligible difference to our national footprint. So, sadly, none of the innovations in this article would make us on the cusp of a low-carbon energy system. And in case anyone wonders, batteries cannot be the entire solution, either.

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

To answer the question posed in the headline (Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?): No, it isn''t. All these are helpful, but as the comments below indicate, there are major issues around both biomethane and hydrogen. Good biomethane, from AD, can certainly be a positive contributor, but the maximum available supply would be minute compared to current demand for gaseous or liquid fossil fuels (natural gas , petrol, diesel...). Hydrogen is "interesting", but still largely at a research stage if we are to find carbon-efficient ways of producing and distributing it. And that leaves E10. Yes, it''s a quick win, but I prefer to think of it as F90 - 90% fossil fuel. moving from 5% to 10% ethanol will make an almost negligible difference to our national footprint. So, sadly, none of the innovations in this article would make us on the cusp of a low-carbon energy system. And in case anyone wonders, batteries cannot be the entire solution, either.

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

To answer the question posed in the headline (Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?): No, it isn''t. All these are helpful, but as the comments below indicate, there are major issues around both biomethane and hydrogen. Good biomethane, from AD, can certainly be a positive contributor, but the maximum available supply would be minute compared to current demand for gaseous or liquid fossil fuels (natural gas , petrol, diesel...). Hydrogen is "interesting", but still largely at a research stage if we are to find carbon-efficient ways of producing and distributing it. And that leaves E10. Yes, it''s a quick win, but I prefer to think of it as F90 - 90% fossil fuel. moving from 5% to 10% ethanol will make an almost negligible difference to our national footprint. So, sadly, none of the innovations in this article would make us on the cusp of a low-carbon energy system. And in case anyone wonders, batteries cannot be the entire solution, either.

Report: Existing climate solutions, not innovations, crucial to meeting net-zero

A 10 kilometre deep lined and capped water well can convert all power stations to clean energy, a cut of 30% in CO2 emissions. A 20% cut would come from electrification of all vehicles. 41% would come from coating all buildings in Starlite. Aircraft and Ships could halve emissions by using fuel mixed with water using an ultrasonic dibber. Aircraft account for 6% of CO2, while shipping accounts for 4.5%, so another 5.25% can be saved. The total savings would then be 96.25%. Improving soil using biochar would then cut CO2 in the atmosphere by locking it in the ground. Cement based on magnesium silicates, not only requires much less heating, it also absorbs large amounts of CO2 as it hardens, making it carbon negative. It can all be paid for by eliminating mental illness using the Kadir-Buxton Method.

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

@ Richard, I have a similar personal ignorance. Try the explanation, obviously provided by a scientist , at https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/climatescience/climatesciencenarratives/its-water-vapor-not-the-co2.html

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Just an afterthought, can anybody explain, at a molecular level, just how CO2, out weighted by water vapour some 50:1 can punch so much above its weight? The radiative element is disputed as being some three tines too large as used in official climate models. But I am not au fait with this calculation. I get no response from official circles. Richard Phillips

'Formula One Fridges' delivering carbon savings for Sainsbury's

Co-Op uses doors on the majority of their fridges. Simple but bloody effective at keeping the cold air where it needs to be and helping to keep the chiller aisles a lot warmer and more comfortable for customers. KISS - Keep It Simple Stoopid

Waste heat from London Underground to warm homes in Islington

Now this is the sort of joined up, adult thinking we need to harness. Using any waste to create heat for homes, social buildings and even commercial buildings is a great idea. No such thing as Waste - one man''s waste is another''s gold mine

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Hydrogen, volume for volume, compared to methane, contains only one third of the energy of the latter! So three times the volume is needed to provide the same energy, This also means an increase in the line capacity, or an increase in the pressure (already 750psi in the gas grid). E10 will contain twice as much alcohol as at present. Since alcohol has half the calorific value of petrol, it reduce the mpg by about 5%. Sneaky! The hydrogen task Force is lobbying for 1bn-----you bet they are!!!! Richard Phillips

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

@John, you did not answer my question about the CO2 co-produced with bio-methane. And you seem very determined to finger-wag at anyone who does not necessarily agree with you. That can be really irritating for those at whom you are finger-wagging. @David Peacock, water to hydrogen means 30% loss of electricity in. hydrogen to electricity means 60% loss of the chemical energy in the hydrogen, by way of an expensive fuel cell, to turn the hydrogen to electricity at the very best. Last time I looked, the fuel cell still depends on platinum to operate well. So hydrogen seems a pretty dreadful way to store surplus but expensive renewable electricity.

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Can we please have some more facts and figures in these reports? If we are to use hydrogen, what is the source of the energy needed to liberate it? And then the energy efficiency of the system to get that hydrogen to our homes or vehicles? With regard to AD, you write a lot about decarbonising agriculture, without ever mentioning the feed source for the anaerobic digestion. Presumably agriculture, maybe after its products have become waste food. What scale of contribution do you or its advocates think that will make to our zero carbon future? All a bit too lacking in numerical detail...

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

AD is a great alternative. We have been responsible for increasing the Methane output of a major Southern Water site by 15%, yet they refuse to let us try another!! Also, compared to commercial AD sites the Utility Companies only extract enough Methane to satisfy their requirement of making the digestate suitable for landspread. They should be required to leave product in their digesters for much longer. John Thompson (www.electronicdescaler.com)

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Surely any sustainable proposal for increasing the use of hydrogen should make it clear that its source has to be water and its electrolysis by renewable electricity?

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

@ John Briggs, exactly right! And the last time I looked, bio-methane is produced with a roughly equal amount of CO2. What happens to that? Oh! I see! "We, therefore, need robust and immediate support from government to capitalize on the sector''s wide-ranging environmental and social benefits, In other words subsidies taken from tax payers and consumers and given to the ADBA members?

Report: Existing climate solutions, not innovations, crucial to meeting net-zero

The UK challenge to meet net zero carbon by 2050 is a huge task, but most studies focus on how to better use our energy which is very important, however it is arguable that most of our energy needs to be supplied by zero carbon electricity by 2050, with the help of heat pumps to extract energy from the air and ground. If you consider the latest data from BEIS for 2018 the total energy production in that year was 2,234 TWh when the total electricity generated was only 351.2 TWh of which zero carbon renewables and nuclear were 182 TWh or just 8% of all the UK''s energy generation, so we have to increase our zero carbon electricity from 182 to 2,234 TWh or more than 12 times. in 2018 renewables generated 116 TWh of electricity; due to the limited space on land and sea, we might be able to increase renewable electricty 5 times, to say 600 TWh by 2050, but that still leaves a deficit of 1,634 TWh that we must produce by other zero carbon electricity, and the only other source is nuclear. To put this in perspective, Hinkley Point C nuclear power station will produce 3.2 GW or 28 TWh running 24/7 every day of the year which is unrealistic, and a load factor of 60% should be used, reducing the output to about 17 TWh. So if the new nuclear generation was by Hinkley Point sized power stations we would need to build nearly 100 of them to be up and running by 2050. Fortunately there are other nuclear alternatives in the form of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) that could be mass produced in factories and shipped to site by heavy road transport. If they burned Thorium instead of Uranium they would produce far less radioactive waste, and if they were fueled by molten salt, they would not require expensive high pressure equipment. This kind of reactor has been run for many years, but it does not produce plutonium that the military required. The other advantages of SMRs is that they can be used to retrofit existing fossil fuel power stations, saving the cost of the steam turbines, generators a power distribution equipment that is already installed. While Project Dowload touches on these suggestions, it does not focus on this core task to transform electicity generation to zero carbon.

E10 petrol, hydrogen and biomethane: Is the UK on the cusp of low-carbon heat and transport?

Where is the hydrogen coming from?

Report: Existing climate solutions, not innovations, crucial to meeting net-zero

So Alvin Scott, where does your hydration come from? How is it manufactured and what is the energy balance from manufacture to use in your turbine? Also in burning hydrogen in a turbine what is the NOx output of that turbine and how does that affect Air quality? How much hydrogen do you need to carry onboard to do a days work? How many miles In the days work In. question? I am interested to know how your system works as a complete energy balance.

Hydrogen: a critical piece of the net-zero jigsaw? - North West Hydrogen Alliance blog

CO2 is not harmful nor is it a pollutant. It is the gas of life. It powers everything we do thanks to its essential role in photosynthesis. Hydrogen is an energy waste. It takes twice as much energy to create it (by reforming CH4, itself a waste, or by electrolysis of water, itself presenting potential environmental disasters) than you get back by burning it. And water vapour is the biggest Greenhouse Gas by volume and effect. It is not the green panacea that everyone makes out

Government announces major overhaul to UK's onshore wind subsidies

Does this mean more wind farms and turbines around the SE of England? Oh don''t be silly of course not! That''s what the wilderness of the Scottish Highlands are for.

One year on: How the IPCC report has redefined sustainable business leadership - The reporter's blo

A good reflection of the situation.

Report: Existing climate solutions, not innovations, crucial to meeting net-zero

Hello, If it was possible to get to net zero under existing plans then it could have been done several years ago. I say again on edie.net there is Hydrogen innovation which would make the change to clean energy far less costly than present routes. The problem for those making these decisions and in and around the Energy world is that these new innovations turn things upside down. The choice for these people is clear, change systems which developed due to the Fossil Fuels era or increase costs on amending those systems and allow future generations to pay an ever increasing price. e.g. Geely/Volvo/ LEVC = electric London Taxi, it has a petrol engine generator as a Range extender, I asked for support to carry out initial modelling of my concept for a new Hydrogen fueled turbine as generator. This would result in small battery pack, lower weight, lower cost, always running on Zero emissions. No need for hundreds of charge points---no need for increased generating capacity ..... No need for massive back-up batteries by the thousands. Yet stifled/blocked from funding whilst low carbon petrol = 12 mill average per year from APC UK ... not even 500,000 for initial modelling of a new engine that just might decarbonise UK transport in short time at exceptional low cost. Gone to Berlin Technical University where there is support from R&D to carry out initial modelling, The view being "Lets take a look"

Low-carbon generation edges past 50% share of UK's power demand

The present generating capacity of wind power is some 22GW, but due to the huge variation of wind speed, it can fall to only a few mega.watts over several days. And solar has zero at night, of course, and generates from zero at dawn, maximum at midday, falling to zero at sunset. To increase wind capacity threefold, will not do a thing to help long periods of high pressure and low or no wind, when only perhaps 5% or lower. But these huge variations ore completely hidden by quoting overall generation, a sleight of tongue used by the renewable industry lobby. Hardly a surprise. We have three reliable, controllable sources of generation; coal, gas and nuclear. Coal is out. The greens wish to eliminate gas. This leaves only nuclear, but HMG have no solid plans to build anything like the nuclear capacity needed to replace gas (which incidentally makes up for wind variation, it is flexible, but that means enforced inefficiency!). Does HMG consult Electrical Power Engineers??? No, it goes to the National Infrastructure Commission, headed by an architect!!! You couldn''t make it up! Richard Phillips

Five key considerations for businesses investing in electric vehicles

They always do the economics based on London. Where are the same economics for lincoln or Barnsley or Middlesbrough? Who in their (un)right mind would drive into London from 30 miles out when there are electric trains which would deliver a lower carbon footprint...

Government won't appeal Heathrow expansion court decision

If the Government made some of the Freight companies relocate to other UK Airports it would result in two major advantages with positive effects on Sustainability: 1. Less planes landings at Heathrow, so it could manage with two runways 2. Freight would be much landed closer to its final destination thereby cutting haulage journeys Its not Rocket Science! John Thompson

Drax to end coal generation in 2021

"Undercut by ever-cheaper clean power, coal units have been struggling for years and closing early is a sign of the times. "All the evidence now points to a clean energy system also being the best for energy security and for lower bills" Odd thing, the uncontrollable nature of natural energy, wind and solar now costs the household consumer some 13bn a year, or about 300 each, per year. All those huge batteries, frequency control, never needed before renewables. The NIC also recommends an in increase in them to Parliament, and sees little future for nuclear energy, the ultimate reliable and controllable generator. An enormous problem is the sheer technical ignorance at the NIC, and in Parliament. But it all makes lots of money for the "smart" people, who present wind generation in terms of terra.watts per year, thus cunningly concealing the huge swings in output from a maximum, 22 giga.watts). which is often subject to some exclusion (cost!!), and down to a very few mega.watts. We need to have 45-50 GW available. Must stop; this stuff could fill a book! Richard Phillips

Andrex wet wipes certified as 'fine to flush' by Water UK

If it ain''t passed through your tube it shouldn''t pass down the sewer tube Simples

Environment Bill: Green groups' five key asks for a 'gold standard' nature emergency response

About the interim targets to reach net zero carbon emissions within 30 years, the Government needs to start making plans for where all the zero carbon energy will come from by 2050, not just plans for how we use it. In 2018 the UK generated 2,234 TWh of all energy when the total electricity generation was only 351 TWh and zero carbon was only 182 TWh of that including nuclear (BEIS figures). By 2050 the UK must supply all its energy needs with zero carbon electricity, so we have to increase it from 182 TWh to 2,234 TWh assuming that increasing energy demand is matched with energy savings, a massive task that needs a plan.

ONE DAY LEFT to register for edie's business fleet electrification masterclass

EV''s from a renewable energy based distributed local energy grid requires huge capacity increase and beefing up the of the old distribution grid. Who is going to do this and pay for it? As the "Net Surplus energy" for the UK economy drops below 11.2 to 1, over the next 10 years, our lives will be forcibly "Simplified" why are we still sleep walking into this?

Bank of England under pressure over board member's oil links

How many times must we shout it? Oil is NOT JUST FOR FUEL!!! Oil makes our laptops, smartphones, medical equipment, life saving drugs, fertilizers, synthetic fabrics (including Greenpeace''s waterproofs and life jackets), kayaks, boats, fridges and a myriad of other everyday essentail products. Having an oil company director on the BoE board allows the Bank to have a voice at the top table to ensure the oil company do work to reduce their impact. And until Greenpeace stop burning thousands of litres of fuel oil and diesel every day in the campaign boats, RIBS and stop paddling around in plastic kayaks wearing synthetic life jackets they have absolutely no leg to stand on in this arguement.

SSE's electric vans and Scotland's 'greenest' football team: The sustainability success stories of t

I would have thought that wind turbine blades would be the very definition of the "circular economy". They only do one thing. Fun Fact. Turbine blades are manufactured on the IOW and are shipped by barge across the Solent for finishing. The name of the barge used? Blade Runner of course. Spoke to an SSE engineer a couple of years ago and he said that all SSE installations big and small had a 13A socket and Electric Vans would fit in very well with their work. I wonder if anybody pays for the tiny amount of power that can be taken or if it is too small to meter.

Cheltenham retirement complex to slash emissions with ground source heat pumps

Colin - very valid questions to which I admit I don''t have concrete answers. However when a Heat Pump is built in at source the payback is not really an issue as buildings need a source of heating be that HP or "wet" CH. When retrofitted to an existing property it can cost tens of thousands and payback can be measured in decades (from my own investigations into my house), even if you factor in replacing a failed wet boiler. In summer people will still require Hot Water so the HP will still be providing that. It may be engineeringly possible to use reverse cooling to provide this but that might make the system too complex to be viable. And good point, why not install solar panels on the complex roof to provide the electricity to power the HP?

Cheltenham retirement complex to slash emissions with ground source heat pumps

What is the cost of the system and payback timings? What are the savings compared to gas? How efficient is the system in summer where heat is not required? Does the process reverse to provide cooling? Why don t they use Renewable electricity To be zero carbon?

Cheltenham retirement complex to slash emissions with ground source heat pumps

"the heat pumps will produce 33 tonnes of CO2 annually" - This is VITALLY important to note. Heat Pumps are NOT ZERO CARBON and therefore should never be described as such. Now I happen to think developments like this are vital to the need to change our heating from burning things (coal, oil, gas, biomass). District heating systems, such as this retirement complex or the system using the Clyde, are the best way forward as they benefit from both an economy of scale and by having been designed specifically for a particular need. Plus with well insulated buildings they work far more effectively. The recent article on BBC News about using town/city parks and green spaces as GSHP is also interesting as long as the green spaces are not damaged as they play a vital role in cleaning the air in urban areas. My worry is that Heat Pumps will be forced upon every household regardless as for many older homes (in fact some new builds too) they simply do not work effectively enough to heat the home properly or efficiently. Knee Jerk reactions or policy decisions for "green credentials" will not help but could make the situation far far worse and cost homeowners large fortunes which most simply do not have.

FOUR DAYS LEFT to register for edie's business fleet electrification masterclass

When everybody has done it, from where does the electricity come????? Richard Phillips

FIFA vows to deliver carbon-neutral 2022 World Cup

This all seems very late in the day. We''re two years off the tournament and this is being pledged now?! What about all the damage caused already, also, how can FIFA claim what they are here, when it is glaring that there are a multitude of questions and unstable commitments. Massive greenwashing underway again.

Facilities management giant Mitie sets 2025 net-zero carbon target

Really good to see an FM provider getting its house in good Carbon order - great move. FM companies can play a massive role working with clients to change not only their environmental behaviours but their social behaviours as well. To date this opportunity has not been seized. Look forward to seeing Mitie develop a full circular economy plan and reporting fully and transparently.

Heathrow commits to becoming zero-carbon airport by mid-2030s

How about covering all those square meters of roof space with solar panels to generate all the power the airport needs (and then some)? If that''s not enough what''s stopping installation of solar panels in the field alongside the taxiways? Instead of just "offsetting" do something concrete and visible.

Government unveils plans for ?1.2bn climate 'supercomputer'

CO2 is the catalyst in a positive feedback cycle. A small increase in CO2 increases the temperature, which leads to more water vapour, as you note; a stronger greenhouse gas, which in turn increases temperature - amplifying the effect of the temperature increase in CO2. The amount of water vapour would not have changed if all other variables had remained the same. Hence, the importance of the role of CO2, and other gases, in warming the climate. I would be interested to know what enquiries you made to the Met Office, and what their response was. Many thanks. Regards,

Accelerating climate action: edie evolves flagship energy and sustainability event into Net-Zero Liv

The first mission should be "by what mechanism does CO2 influence global warming?" Is the rise in global temperature associated with, or caused by, the rise in CO2, still only 0.04% of our atmosphere, and only one fiftieth of the water vapour, the big GHG? Then explain it. But that is difficult, so just accepted. Are we being a bit too green? Richard Phillips

Government unveils plans for £1.2bn climate 'supercomputer'

Undoubtedly a very fine new computer; but we must be ever aware that if there is any error in the input data, the output be useless!!! The Met Office have a fixed idea of the influence of one part in fifty of CO2 on the major greenhouse gas, water vapour. But this seems to be without a definitive model of just how CO2 manages to punch so much above its weight. My enquiries of them have produced only one answer which was, frankly, ludicrous. I pointed out the error; since then silence!!! Rubbish in, rubbish out. Richard Phillips

Government focuses on hydrogen in £90m industrial decarbonisation funding

250,000 people amounts to only a small town. Let''s see some commitment to reducing energy demand through improving energy losses in buildings too. Renewables on their own won''t be enough!

Government focuses on hydrogen in ?90m industrial decarbonisation funding

Wow 90 million and I have a Hydrogen Turbine generator concept which I have had to take to the Berlin Technical University to even get the project assessed and be considered for initial modelling. We are now searching for funding to cover costs of initial modelling. Correct .... No Help/support from Innovate UK ... NO HELP nor support from Advanced Propulsion Centre UK in fact I would say stifled & Blocked Was it my connection with USA Company who have developed Low voltage Hydrogen production and the intention to have Hydrogen produced on board EVs and On site for Off grid houses. The biggest problems. are trying to make "Clean Energy fit into the existing systems & networks devised for the use of Fossil Fuels. NOT NEEDED. I can produce Hydrogen in my lounge and my Toy H2 Fuel Cell car whizzes along the carpet. New Energy new systems

Sadiq Khan sets up ?50m fund to bring London to net-zero

So Mr Scott, hydrogen is going to be cheaper. Please explain where we are going to get the de ionised water needed to make electrolytic hydrogen from renewable electricity which is the only low carbon solution currently available. Then hydrogen has One third of the calorific value Of natural gas so you need to burn three times as much to get the same heat as the Methane boiler. It s therefore needs to be one third of the price. We burn twice as much energy for heat in the UK as the electricity we use so we need a shed load more electricity to make electrolytic hydrogen to replace this heat. Pure hydrogen in steel pipes makes them brittle so all of London s pipework will need systematically to be replaced with plastic. Hydrogen burns with an invisible flame and therefore cannot be used for cooking either. Overall not as easy as you seem to make out.

Sadiq Khan sets up ?50m fund to bring London to net-zero

I would suggest that the people such as Greenpeace etc should stop protesting and support projects which could/will bring about Zero Emissions in use EVs and other energy creation methods. Likewise the Mayors Office does not even bother to reply to offers/requests for support Sorry to say that whilst the Emissions Free Zones sound good they only apply to vehicles what about all those Gas Boilers using methane Natural gas. Hydrogen = Zero Emissions = make money available for development. All that is happening is that a small amount in terms of the Global problem is being challenged, whilst there are massive sewage pipes pouring into the lake. Hydrogen Globally because it can be achieved more rapidly because it will be a lower cost for all countries and people.

Plan to expand Bristol airport rejected after climate protests

The Ontario Teachers Pension Plan Climate Change Report regarding their responsible investment stratgey is available here https://www.otpp.com/documents/10179/859251/2018+Climate+Change+Report/152d6724-3d35-4f69-8971-641ec13ed737

Can HS2 comply with the UK's net-zero target?

The primary question is "Will Rail as a passenger inter city transport system be overtaken by Innovation in Electric Auto Pilot Drones within 5 years ? " Secondary question, "Who will want to pay hundreds of pounds/who will be able to pay for a ticket. Where is the electricity coming from for all these expansions in electrified transportation. Especially if HyPulJet Ezi H2 becomes available, HSR 2 will not be completed. HyPulJet is a concept for Hydrogen Turbine as a generator and Ezi H2 is Low voltage H2 production method to be adapted for on board H2 production already developed bu USA company. HSR 2 is not a 21st Century means of transport..... auto pilot Zero emissions drones and auto pilot zero emissions cars are the future. 500,000 in funding to Berlin Technical University to carry out initial modelling. 100,000,000,000 would cover the cost of making every house in the UK Zero emissions Clearly wrong use of Tax payers funds, probably to line the pockets of Tory Party donors

Sector coupling: Electrification of transport and buildings could slash emissions by 60%

Only a 75% increase in electricity demand? Really? Who came up with that figure. If the entire UK car fleet is swapped to Electric, the UK switches to electric based heating (Heat Pumps use electricity) and we start to create Hydrogen by electrolysis then it will be more than a 75% increase, more likely a 200% increase in demand. And to use electricity to create Hydrogen requires an EXCESS of electricity and results in less energy available from the Hydrogen than it took to make it so a net negative to the energy balance. Not to mention that electricity costs 3x as much per KWHr as Gas and Oil to heat our homes

In the wake of Davos, what lies ahead for 2020? - The JLL Blog

I like the photo you used. Maybe we should encourage vertical gardening in high rise accommodations and even, dare I say it, commercial properties. Just imagine the square meterage of green you could achieve in London if every balcony had a window box, every wall/fence/shed had a vertical garden? If every roof was a garden? As plants take in CO2 to grow and provide us with Oxygen they also filter out particulates and other chemicals from the air so our cities would become cleaner, nicer places to live.

Reports: Budget to include new energy efficiency and EV subsidies to spur net-zero progress

Incentives for development of "slot in" alternative wet central heating boilers would be a good start. At present there is no viable alternative to heating the water in common wet heating systems. Heat Pumps don''t get hot enough to do the job efficiently and effectively as current CH requires water temperatures of 65-70 C which Heat Pumps, at present, can not reach. So to change from gas or oil heating you need to completely replace the entire system. Boiler, Radiator and all the hundreds of meters of pipework at a cost of tens of thousands of pounds. Encourage someone to develop a "Thermodynamic" system than can simply slot into the system and replace the boiler and still provide water to 70 C.

Reports: BlackRock and Barclays to act on climate investment calls

IT''S NOT JUST FUEL!!! Even if we stop burning oil and gas tomorrow humanity will still be demanding petroleum for decades to come for everything from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals, from nylons to Gore-Tex(tm), from anti-corrosion paints for offshore wind turbines to plastic parts in EVs, from circuit boards to lifesaving medical equipment. WAKE UP AND SMELL THE ENVIRO-BULL

Lego to ditch virgin fossil plastics by 2030

Correction: should read as, ''Danish newspaper B rsen''.

Accelerating aviation's carbon reduction journey - The Fly Aware blog

Hi Tim, thanks for your question. Through CORSIA, the regulation agreed through the International Civil Aviation Organization and governments around the world, airlines will offset growth in CO2 emissions from international flying above current levels. It s entirely funded by airlines and is estimated at $40 billion over the next 15 years. However, CORSIA only covers international flights, so we re encouraging governments to develop a CORSIA-like mechanism that also covers domestic flights. The airlines would fund that offsetting too, not taxpayers. Offsetting is just part of the solution, which is why we re also working with governments to increase the production of sustainable aviation fuels to meet growing demand, modernise air traffic management systems and support hybrid and electric aircraft research and development. There are lots of pieces of the puzzle to reduce our impact upon the climate. In the meantime, a growing number of airlines, airports and manufacturers have committed to going net-zero, and others offer passengers options to offset their flights if they would like to reduce their personal carbon footprint. It s our responsibility to tackle this challenge, but we welcome everyone participating if they want.

Scotland Budget outlines multi-million-pound pots for net-zero heat and agriculture

Good to see the Scottish Government moving away from their destructive policy of onshore wind and supporting things like Tidal Stream and more Hydro. Scotland is blessed (some might say cursed) with some of the highest rainfall in Europe so should be making the most of our liquid assets. We are also blessed with some very warm coastal and tidal waters that could, through development of district heating systems, heat our buildings for no carbon at all. You just have to look at the steam rising from Loch Linnhe on a cold winters day to realise there is a huge reservoir of heat right on Fort William''s doorstep to be tapped. However I would like to see more R&D into alternative domestic heating systems other than the bog standard Heat Pumps. As I''ve said previously Heat Pumps don''t work well with older homes and wet Central Heating as they simply do not heat the water hot enough (it needs 65-70 C not the 40-45 C from a heat pump). So until there is a "thermodynamic" system that can slot in and replace the traditional gas and oil fired boiler and reach 70 C it will be prohibitively expensive to replace the entire wet CH system. Still it is an improvement on the single egg in the basket we''ve seen up to now.

COP26: Boris Johnson to move diesel ban forward to 2035 and call for global net-zero transition

Given to replace the UK fleet of vehicles with fully electric will take twice as much Cobalt as exists on Earth when will the Green" movement realise that EVs are NOT the answer? What will happen if someone develops a liquid fuel from a fully renewable source, such as algae or seaweed or even domestic food waste? What if someone finds a way to create kerosene/diesel from waste products? Will the government backtrack and re-permit clean/lean burn Internal Combustion? Road to Hell IS Paved With Good Intentions

Green policies? Actions speak louder than words - The Ethex Blog

Whilst I welcome the increased notions of ''intent'', I remain unconvinced that, our politicians or even, our business leaders have fully grasped what it means to achieve ''net-zero''. Unless and until the business as usual mould is broken across all paradigms, including transportation, construction, retailing, product design, manufacture and the public sector we will struggle to achieve our intended goals. it appears to me that for all the goodwill, we currently look to see what is on the shelf, and then cobble together the ''latest'' offers in piecemeal fashion, convincing ourselves that is as good as it gets. What we need to be doing is to start asking better questions as a means to providing better solutions. For example, the question shouldn''t be, "should we buy electric or hydrogen powered vehicles?" but rather, "do we need to buy/own/drive vehicles?" Might we be best served, environmentally and financially, where transport is a service, driver-less and delivered rapidly at point of need, through a seamless and grail-like integrated transport infrastructure? The latest Nissan Leaf driver-less journey indicates the potential for the technology, and discussions dating back several years with strategy experts at Jaguar, suggested the technology to link-up vehicles electronically already existed. Hey presto, we have a road-based, low-carbon-powered train! Safer, less congestion, less stress, cleaner air, more productivity (pv-powered induction recharging? Who knows?). Finally, I''ll accept for now that many organisations have ''put down a marker'' where they would like the Target to be. When the planned, costed, itemised projects, along with their SMART objectives and performance indicators, come into focus, I may be willing to accept them as a Target!

UK's low-carbon heat networks receive ?40m Government boost

There is nothing inherently low carbon about district heating. This article spends a lot of time talking about the latter, under a headline that emphasises the former. An energy from waste plant, designed for combined heat and power, might be considered low carbon, if the waste burnt was "biomass" as that does not attract a carbon tax (approx. 20/tonne), but the CO2 looks the same as if the plant was burning gas or coal. Next time can we please clarify what is "low carbon" about a scheme and not hide behind elaborate descriptions of something that is not inherently low carbon at all?

Accelerating aviation's carbon reduction journey - The Fly Aware blog

Michael, hi You write in your Fly Aware blog " we are encouraging governments to go further by committing to offset domestic flights, for example.". That seems to be saying that you expect Government to offset the pollution that your industry creates from domestic flights. Is that correct? If so I feel that this is outrageous. Your airline members with multi- billion turnovers expect me, a taxpayer and non-flyer to subsidise your profits and those that fly frequently, as and when they want. What legitimacy is there in that argument?

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@keiron - I agree 200%. That though takes 0,000s of decisions and actions - less than a handful by manufacturers, and a few more if left to the retailers. And that seems a lot simpler, although not easy.

Northern Ireland declares 'climate emergency' as UK moves coal phase-out forward

How is "climate emergency" defined, what parameters, and what are their values??? Who can tell me just exactly how CO2 can influence our warming more than our most important GHG, water vapour; about 50 times more abundant!! Richard Phillips

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

Northern Powergrid and OVO Energy make fresh bids to spur EV uptake

All very well, but, who will generate all this power???? And if these generators are to relied upon to meet demand, they cannot be renewables, all of which may fall to near zero for many hours or days. Only coal gas or nuclear are demand lead, and the pundits do not want coal or gas. And, moreover, of the five new nuclear projects, two major generators have been pulled by the contractors. Mrs T told us that "nuclear will always be available in the market". What infallible wisdom, it lead to all nuclear activity being scrapped in 1989! Ah, me!!! Richard Phillips

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

@Ray - That is why it is up to us, the consumer, to change our shopping habits. While people continue to purchase single use, plastic wipes, throwaway clothing and other such products companies will continue to produce them and make a profit. If we don''t buy them the companies will lose turnover then, and only then, will they produce more sustainable versions. Hit them where it hurts and change attitudes with your wallet

UK's largest housebuilder sets 1.5C-aligned emissions targets

Does this mean Barrett Homes will now implement properly monitored and maintained Quality Control standards in its building? By this I mean ensuring things like insulation are correctly installed with minimal thermal bridging and maybe installing fully "smart" heating systems rather than the cheapest alternatives? Time for the building industry to take the quality bull by the horns and show us, the house buying public, that we can trust them to build high quality, energy efficient homes with the absolute minimum of "snags" #TakePrideInTheJob

Mary Robinson: Business and governments must avoid net-zero 'hypocrisy'

Ken, I agree with the need for solutions rather than dialogue saying all fossil fuels are bad. For example, how could renewables operate without firming from gas turbines? That firming only makes up a small proportion of the total energy generation, so it''s contribution is small but it provides a buffer for the intermittent nature of renewables. However, I would have to disagree with you on "barely a single prediction about how our world is in danger of catastrophe that has not proven false". I''m assuming you''re referring to climate models, do you have any peer reviewed evidence to support this? Please see this research paper which concludes that 14 out of 17 climate models studied were indistinguishable from what actually occurred. https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019GL085378 Further reading: https://www.carbonbrief.org/analysis-how-well-have-climate-models-projected-global-warming

Seven things sustainability professionals can learn from Hugh and Anita's War on Plastic

One issue which became clear was none of the big firms e.g. manufacturers of wipes and similar products were prepared to move until they were forced to i.e. they were all scared of reductions in profit - that was not said but was the root issue. None were true leaders and were ''expert'' at greenwash.

Mary Robinson: Business and governments must avoid net-zero 'hypocrisy'

It would be more helpful if Mrs Robinson offered some idea of how one would run the economy without fossil fuels - and in particular how we would help less developed economies attain the levels of prosperity we enjoy if they are not to use oil and gas. But why is one not surprised? She is not an engineer, knows nothing of what is required to achieve her "net zero" economy, and prefers to dilate on how terrible everything is now, without the slightest idea of how to change - without impoverishing everyone! We need politicians in touch with reality, and not listening to the doomsayers! Remember there is barely a single prediction about how our world is in danger of catastrophe that has not proven false. Why should we believe them now?

Report: UK Government's net-zero plans 'over-reliant' on biomass and carbon capture

And how is shipping wood pellets halfway around the world in oil powered cargo ships "net zero"? Not to mention the petrol used to power the chainsaws, the diesel to transport the logs from forest to sawmill then from sawmill to port? Biomass is the biggest Green con out

'A critical decade': Sky commits to net-zero emissions by 2030

Sky shows the kind of focus and commitment we need across the board in all sectors. Well done Sky! This is an example of what needs to be done by everyone. Sky has focused fully on this issue, set a clear target and will get the job done. All actions and investments in the future by Sky will be examined with this strong focus. If all businesses in the UK take a similar "war footing" then there is a chance we can make it. The UK''s carbon budget runs out in 2024 at current rates of emissions but with thousands of major companies driving Sky style ambition and better in relation to net zero now then our runway extends. Sky''s is a beacon of light in the darkness! Great article Matt! Hope to meet up soon. Ed Gemmell, Believers Action On Climate Change

Change climate policy now to avert oil market crisis, warns thinktank

The "knee jerk" reactions against fossil fuels threatens to destroy our modern, technological civilisation because of a misunderstanding over what the oil and gas industry actually provides. Firstly, oil is more than just fuel. It is the raw material for all sorts of things from medical equipment, corrosion resistant paints and coatings (for offshore wind turbines for instance), plastic casings for batteries, body parts for electric vehicles, pharmaceuticals, fertilizers and a billion other everyday items we all want and need. So if you want to avoid fossil fuel investments take a long hard look at all the petrochemicals, synthetic fabrics and plastics in your home and car and office then imagine life without them. #MoreThanJustFuel

EY targets carbon neutrality by end of 2020

According to the marketforces website E&Y is working on the Adani coal mine project - a huge and unnecessary new coal mine being built very close to the Great Barrier Reef. Many banks refused to fund it, accountancy and legal firms should refuse to work on it. It is great to see that E&Y is taking this step but if they really want to make a difference to the amount they contribute to carbon emissions they should look at their internal policies on who they are working with and refuse to work on any new coal mines. https://www.marketforces.org.au/info/key-issues/theadanilist/

Investment in infrastructure must take centre stage to drive growth in renewables - Gresham House p

"...A crucial area of investment is in grid-scale energy storage, an essential feature of the UK s national infrastructure that helps to stabilise the intermittent supply of energy from renewables, by addressing supply/demand imbalances in real time. Since the level of power generated varies on a day-to-day basis, battery storage helps to ensure electricity supply remains constant..." LAES cuts the cost of energy storage by 94% below that of Li-ion battery storage. Maybe this signals the way to a low-carbon solution to the ''intermittency problem'': https://bwrx-300-nuclear-uk.blogspot.com/2019/10/the-intermittency-problem-will-energy.html

UK sued for approving Europe's biggest gas power station

ClientEarth is seeking, through its legal action (Judicial Review) to challenge, and if successful, overturn the Secretary of State''s decision. That is quite different to suing the Government

Corporate clean energy contracts grew by 40% in 2019

To quote renewable energy output in TWh/year entirely conceals the huge variation in electricity available at any one time. All renewables are reliant upon the vagaries, as well as the regularities, of nature. Just what the industry does to hide this crippling failing. Richard Phillips

Heathrow Airport launches flight offsetting tool for passengers

It should be noted that Greta Thunberg is not possibly an informed source of information based on any knowledge of the science involved in global warming or climate change matters. Sir David Attenborough is likewise not a physical science graduate, he is a zoologist, and a very, very well informed exponent in those matters. Their comments should be confined by these limitations. A large financial industry has grown up around "off-setting", very profitable. Renewable power has often to rely on foreign sources of fossil power at times of low wind (our largest renewable source)'' Richard Phillips

Businesses team up to launch net-zero infrastructure taskforce

The National Infrastructure Commission urges Javid to work towards "50% renewables". The data quoted by them refers to electricity generation in terms of TWh per year, totally in ignorance, it would seem, that one of the most important factors is the need to match supply with demand, not for users to have electricity only when it is available. Wind generated electricity can fall to only about 5%, if that, for many days when a stable high settles over the British Isles. And that happens at once or twice every year, both in winters and summer (in April last, 14GW of wind fell to below 1GW, one "standard power station", needs go up to 45-50 at peak) The number of persons having the technical knowledge to make judgements in such matters is limited to very, very few in Commons, and is almost entirely non-existent at Ministerial level. There have been exceptions (Therese Coffey-chemist) Moreover, the willingness to accept professional advice is muted, financial words take prided of place We are heading for the wall. Richard Phillips

National Grid: 400,000 energy jobs must be filled to hit net-zero

@ Richard Phillips. Hi Richard, I wrote this piece. 140,000 of the roles already exist, but the people working them are forecast to leave them by 2050. Of the other 260,000 roles, the majority will not be with National Grid directly. The research accounts for the entire energy sector value chain, including private generation, transmission, manufacturing, decomissioning, construction, and R&D.

National Grid: 400,000 energy jobs must be filled to hit net-zero

400,000 extra salaries, to be met by National Grid, and passed on to our suppliers, and in turn to us. Something in the region of 12bn per annum. With about 25,000,000 house-holds this is in the region of 500-600 per house-hold. Subsidies for renewables already cost us about 300 per house-hold, so by 2050 this cost will rise to just under 1000 per house-hold. Or have I gone wrong somewhere?? Richard Phillips

National Grid: 400,000 energy jobs must be filled to hit net-zero

I have just one question to ask: can anybody out there explain, on a scientific basis, how do slight increases in CO2, as gas at about one fiftieth the concentration of our principal GHG, water vapour, (whose concentration itself varies hugely), have such a huge influence on our climate? I can find no satisfactory explanation, but would dearly love to know. The Met Office give me the brush off!!!!! Richard Phillips

Switching fleets to electric vehicles: edie launches free business guide

Hmm, not sure I would class 43kWh as rapid, fast yes. Also nothing said about up to 20% of electricity going into your vehicle will be lost as heat yet you pay for it. Little said about cost of connection to electricity grid if depot charging which affects the economics. Batteries don t slowly deplete their either work or fail - then the second user discards the failed ones and reutilises the good ones. Finally say cost is 3p pee mile is not fully correct given the cost of third party recharging that a business user nay very well have to utilise where charges are typically 25-70p/kWh plus connection fees compared to 9p/kWh at home...We need open facts if we are to properly engage with customers...Disappointing

Report: Emissions trading reached record €194bn high in 2019

This reveals quite clearly; the prime mover in the global warming/climate change/CO2 reduction is actually money. These traders have a zero interest in any of the others, just follow the money! Richard Phillips

Businesses not examining carbon impact of plastics alternatives, edie survey finds

My takeaway; this report was sponsored by nestle :)

FOUR DAYS LEFT to register for edie's next webinar on net-zero energy strategies

We have recently corresponded on the subject of the "energy" metals needed to implement the UK Government''s zero emission legislation, well summarised in the letter which distinguished Earth Scientists submitted to the CCC in June last year. Just to remind you https://www.nhm.ac.uk/press-office/press-releases/leading-scientists-set-out-resource-challenge-of-meeting-net-zer.html Will this admittedly difficult question be dealt with in the forthcoming WEBINAR?

FOUR DAYS LEFT to register for edie's next webinar on net-zero energy strategies

We have recently corresponded on the subject of the "energy" metals needed to implement the UK Government''s zero emission legislation, well summarised in the letter which distinguished Earth Scientists submitted to the CCC in June last year. Just to remind you https://www.nhm.ac.uk/press-office/press-releases/leading-scientists-set-out-resource-challenge-of-meeting-net-zer.html Will this admittedly difficult question be dealt with in the forthcoming WEBINAR?

Corporates failing to make circular economy transition, damning report finds

While this is discouraging it should be noted the need of the hour is a fundamental shift in the way humanity addresses the wants and needs. Circular economy is a another word being used to reinstate 3Rs. Circular economy would be successful ONLY when we accelerate the reduce and reuse of materials which implies that the needle of responsibility points at several others beyond corporates and businesses. It should begin at the household level where the children are encouraged, advised and coerced into reusing everything possible through awareness, crafts and skills. This strong foundation is bound to direct the society towards circularity. A good example is the Japanese principle of Mottainai which believed in wasting nothing and reusing everything . This word was used in every household in Japan for several decades in the aftermath of the war to caution the children not to waste anything be it paper or a piece of cloth; not to forget thefood.

Net-zero in the public sector: What might it mean for business? - The ADE blog

Hi Joanne It''s time to shine a light on schools'' carbon reduction..or lack of it. Since schools account for about 60% of public sector carbon emissions this is clearly where the biggest opportunities and challenges exist. But there is no overall carbon reduction strategy for this sector. Why and what do you think we should do about it? One headache is academisation which means it is very difficult to engage with schools in the many multi academy trusts or MATs rather than local authorities. One thing that is certain is that meeting any public sector carbon sectors can''t be achieved unless schools become part of the answer rather than the problem. Maybe the school strikers for climate should be striking against their own schools for not taking action!! Thanks Steffi

UK's first 'smart' commercial hub signs 50-year clean energy innovation deal with E.ON

The ultimate sources of renewable electricity in the commercial field have been obscure. How can wind generation, the principal source provide all the power when it drops to a GW or much less, for days on end. With solar nil overnight, this must be impossible. This quote comes from The Telegraph: "These certificates let firms market their tariffs as completely green, when they might actually be buying electricity from a coal-fired power station. Now, industry insiders say that instead of buying these certificates from UK renewable generators, energy suppliers are purchasing them from Lithuania, the cheapest market for REGOs in the EU. "This is the first time that the existence of a European market for cross-border green certificates has been revealed. It is unclear how many UK energy suppliers have engaged in this practice, although a source said that at least two companies they had worked for had bought dirty REGOs, and described how uncomfortable it made members of staff at the time" Richard Phillips

Horizon scanning: Eight innovations set to shake-up sustainability in 2020

One of the key things we need to do is stop wasting energy not just by being more energy efficient but also by stopping the use of energy to manufacture stuff we just don''t need. Far too many products manufactured end up in landfill in a matter of months if not days in some cases. This is hugely wasteful of both energy and resources. Built in obsolescence needs to be stopped. In a world of finite resources manufacture and use needs to be in sync with cycles of renewal and the circular economy needs to reflect ecological cycles. Do we really need all this stuff?

Inside Lucozade Ribena Suntory's plastics strategy

Very good .... but what happens to all those plastic bottles Ribena and Lucozade ship all over the planet. It is irresponsible and immoral to ship plastic bottles to countries which do not have efficient waste management.

First steps: What must businesses focus on now to deliver a net-zero UK by 2050?

This is quite an informative post. Best regards from Anthony Constantinou

World Economic Forum calls on business chiefs to set net-zero targets

Everyone should aim to be carbon negative, I do so by using Radflek to cut my heating emissions by 45% and give two kits as Christmas presents. In addition, I offset at Trees.org and give this as Christmas presents as well. I have not spent any more at Christmas either. And so can you.

Priceless Planet: Investor coalition pledges to plant 100 million trees

Tree Planting by Drone Could Help To Reach UN Target of a Trillion Trees DENDRA, the makers of Sky Tractors (drones) say that they can plant 150 times faster than conventional methods and in hard to reach places, the land is scanned to ensure that the germinated seed pods are not wasted on such things as rocks and water, before planting starts, the Sky Tractors can be then flown several at a time (if the country permits this) for maximum speed. I have been in contact with Susan Graham CEO with a view to getting the Sky Tractors to plant in equilateral triangles in order to increase crop production by 15% (see Crow''s Footing page). My friend Don Shaw from Australia says: Woke up 2am to smell of smoke drifting from fires, Sounds bit like a California scenario. and sent a photograph he took of the flames sky high. In the climate crisis land use is going to be critical, and also, tree rings around cities, towns, and villages, will keep the area cooler as trees give off water vapour, I have already got Google to cool their servers with trees, it works out cheaper than conventional electrical cooling. Beijing does not have to be the only city with a ring of trees. The Drawdown book edited by Paul Hawken recommends silvopasture, which is planting trees in fields where animals graze, this provides shade, sequester carbon above and below ground, and cut farmer''s costs for feed, fertiliser, and herbicides, it could save 31.19 gigatons of reduced CO2 for a cost of $41.6 billion with a saving of $699.4 billion. Managed grazing can also help. By breaking up fields into smaller areas with fencing, and then moving the animals on regularly the grass is not over cropped and gets time to grow back. Drawdown estimates that this would save 16.34 gigatons of CO2, would cost $50.5 billion, and would save $735.3 billion, so another obvious weapon in the hands of environmentalists.

Businesses not examining carbon impact of plastics alternatives, edie survey finds

"The road to Hell is paved with good intentions" Unless the entire chain of a product is examined it is folly to call something "green", "greener", "low carbon" or "environmentally friendlier". Take the paper bag. You need petrol to power the chainsaw to fell the tree, diesel to power the equipment to move and load the trees, diesel lorries to transport the tree to the sawmill or paper mill, power to operate the mill to create the paper and so on. How much oil is required to make a paper bag? How many plastic bags can you make from that oil? Are paper bags "greener" than plastic, especially if facilities exist to recover the plastic and turn it into something else (possibly more durable and long lasting). The danger is we "knee jerk" react and end up with a worse problem than the one perceived to be the problem. The biggest thing we can all do, with everything, is simple really. We need to reduce our wastage and end consuming for the sake of consuming

Priceless Planet: Investor coalition pledges to plant 100 million trees

The announcement sounds good. In reality, however, others have already moved on. See https://www.ecosia.org/

Breaking the single-use cycle - Jo Gilroy's blog

Jo great reading and the message being delivered is so so true. Together through education, partnership and drive from every possible stakeholder will make the change

BBC's bumper climate coverage and plastic-free snacks: The sustainability success stories of the wee

In note that the UAE report on energy quotes the output in TWh, completely submerging the huge day/night intermittency of the process. the installed capacity is not mentioned. The renewable lobbyists do exactly the same with our wind turbine output, the huge variability, where exact control is essential, is totally ignored. And our uninformed politicians just accept it!!! This policy will take us over the cliff like the walruses. WRT V2G, if an owner of an EV, I would be delighted to find my car down on its charge when I needed it for more miles than in the battery I wished to write to Attenborough, but found no satisfactory route; any suggestions??? I note that he is an excellent zoologist, a far cry from the physics and chemistry (my area) vital to understand global warming. He seems to have the stage to himself. I do wish he would stick to his area---I would not dream of expounding on animal life!!!----But then all our politicians do it! Richard Phillips

BBC's bumper climate coverage and plastic-free snacks: The sustainability success stories of the wee

In note that the UAE report on energy quotes the output in TWh, completely submerging the huge day/night intermittency of the process. the installed capacity is not mentioned. The renewable lobbyists do exactly the same with our wind turbine output, the huge variability, where exact control is essential, is totally ignored. And our uninformed politicians just accept it!!! This policy will take us over the cliff like the walruses. WRT V2G, if an owner of an EV, I would be delighted to find my car down on its charge when I needed it for more miles than in the battery I wished to write to Attenborough, but found no satisfactory route; any suggestions??? I note that he is an excellent zoologist, a far cry from the physics and chemistry (my area) vital to understand global warming. He seems to have the stage to himself. I do wish he would stick to his area---I would not dream of expounding on animal life!!!----But then all our politicians do it! Richard Phillips

BBC's bumper climate coverage and plastic-free snacks: The sustainability success stories of the wee

I hope the BBC will give a balanced, scientifically accurate approach to its "Our Planet Matters" coverage but I''m not going to hold my breath. Science doesn''t get ratings; hysteria, hype and mythinformation does. and when was the last time anyone let facts get in the way of a good story. And why the negative slant of UAE investing in nuclear? Nuclear power is clean and once the power stations are constructed it is zero emission and No Carbon. Run properly with strict control protocols it is the safest form of high demand power we have access to. And the only one that can constantly supply the so called "baseload" for a countrywide grid.

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

The whole idea of this is utter stupidity... As you both have highlighted below the thermal-dynamic mechanics of this is useless. All this excess power they speak of cant just be ramped up and down that quickly as the power plants are now the balancing mechanisms to prevent over or under voltage/frequency of the grid through uncontrollable renewable energy output. Fuel cells require rare earth metals, very expensive to produce. to create the hydrogen from the excess power they speak of will require 150% more generation on the grid, not counting the energy density of hydrogen compared to other fuels. Electric Cars complete waste, consider the 33 million cars in the UK converting to electric now draw 3kw each to charge! Thats almost 100Gw of power the uk grid only produces 45Gw currently not to mention the amount of extra cabling in the ground that required upgrading to transmit it. Now look at the fact that the round trip efficiency of hydrogen is 70% efficient to produce so that power requirement will be even greater!!! Ill leave it the ill informed politicians without our a scrape of common sense to work the rest out of how their going to send the world into darkness. Maybe Greta Turdburg has the answers ?

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

Ben - thanks for pointing out another downside of Hydrogen

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

Because of hydrogen embrittlement of steel, and corrosion natural gas pipes require internal coatings or replacement in order to convey hydrogen. Natural Gas with hydrogen concentrations above 10% can start to cause corrosion with steel within the distribution piping systems.

'Neutral is not enough': Microsoft pledges to become carbon-negative by 2030

I''m pleased by its new stance, but hope that they will bear in mind the environmental damage caused by regular (and often unwanted) software updates rendering old (relatively speaking) but serviceable hardware unusable, because it is unable to load the latest Microsoft software. Their attitude towards backwards compatibility has been very high handed at times, and relied upon enthusiasts to find work-rounds.

Measuring impact on the SDGs through AI - The PwC blog

The company culture has a foot in productivity rates, employee satisfaction and other key factors of business development. Learn how to upscale your business with the help of company culture on our blog here: https://www.peoplehum.com/blog/hr/systemized-company-culture-and-business-upscaling/#bl

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Nigel - I think the problem is councils and housing associations are basically "ticking a box" by installing ASHP in their housing stock without taking the building standards, customer needs or anything else into account. From what I understand from the lady whose electricity bill went up 4x no one had even been to her house to inspect it before the ASHP was installed. They just bolted it on and ticked the box to meet an arbitrary "eco" target. With all the talk of low carbon and renewable people forget that while the heat source is renewable the compressor and pumps take a fair amount of electricity to power them. At 15p/kwhr you have to get 4x more heat than the electricity used to match the cost of oil or gas fired CH. In winter, at single digit temperatures or below, how much heat can an ASHP extract per unit of electricity? I''ve heard talk of as little as 1kw of heat per kw of electricity which is hardly effective or efficient. As I have said previously when properly designed, installed and fit for purpose, in a properly insulated, energy efficient building Heat Pumps are a valuable addition to the heating options but when they are just thrown on an old, leaky, draughty house to meet a KPI they are totally worthless and completely useless.

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

This is a useful discussion and I''m glad I shrugged off my usual reticence to pick an argument. Interesting point about the cost of the power supply going up so much that it rendered the ASHP installation economically unviable. I have also heard that from a contact who used to work with housing associations, where the ASHPs that had recently been installed all had to be removed again, because the tenants could not afford the electricity bills any longer. But arguably that issue arose because of incorrect specification in the first place. Totally agree with Keiron that it will all depend on proper oversight, to ensure no shortcuts and to ensure that specification, design, build quality etc are all correct. Maybe the various UK heat pump trade associations should be banging that drum alongside the perfectly reasonable argument that we need to escalate the rate of deployment of heat pumps. (I am just a retired tank commander and trouble-maker, by the way, so have no axe to grind in this matter).

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

This is a useful discussion and I''m glad I shrugged off my usual reticence to pick an argument. Interesting point about the cost of the power supply going up so much that it rendered the ASHP installation economically unviable. I have also heard that from a contact who used to work with housing associations, where the ASHPs that had recently been installed all had to be removed again, because the tenants could not afford the electricity bills any longer. But arguably that issue arose because of incorrect specification in the first place. Totally agree with Keiron that it will all depend on proper oversight, to ensure no shortcuts and to ensure that specification, design, build quality etc are all correct. Maybe the various UK heat pump trade associations should be banging that drum alongside the perfectly reasonable argument that we need to escalate the rate of deployment of heat pumps. (I am just a retired tank commander and trouble-maker, by the way, so have no axe to grind in this matter).

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Barry - You are correct that most, if not all problems, come from incorrect design or installation. As I said when they are built in from the start, correctly sized and designed for the building then Heat Pumps work brilliantly. It is just Thermodynamics and you can''t argue with Physics. The danger with this urgent target is we might manage to install 1 million Heat Pumps but without oversight and Quality Control 999,999 of them will be unfit for purpose, badly designed and inefficient which completely defeats the purpose. It is exactly like the lack of oversight and QC in the building industry that is allowing modern homes to end up with thermal bridges, gaps in insulation, gaps and draughts despite the standards stating that modern houses should achieve a minimum energy standard. Slapping a solar panel on a North facing roof shouldn''t mean a box can be ticked. Andy - never heard of CO2 being used as a refrigerant I have to admit and the only Heat Pump I have ever seen for HW used R-132 (an HFC) which proved to be unfit for purpose when I tried it as it took 26hrs to heat my water tank (assuming I actually didn''t take any HW out of the tank!!)

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Kieron re: elephant in the rooms for heat pumps -> CO2 heat pumps do not use refrigerants. However these are mostly used in DHW applications, not for continuous heating.

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

"Seems to me that the key requirement is to get the specification right and then ensure that the system is installed as specified." is entirely correct. As an installer of ERP A++ ASHPs on a UK offshore (subsidy free) market, one also knows first hand how the problem installations can occur - it''s almost always down to incorrect design. With regards to age of buildings, insulation levels - it really is irrelevant to the type of heat source, It is the rated output of the Heat Source and the way the Heat Source Delivers the Heat. The above is In relation to (but not limited to) positioning of equipment, available electrical power supply, pipe sizing & flow rates, heat emitter surface area etc. On a retrofit refurbishment installation, a new ASHP installation easily competes with a new Oil fired installation. On an existent retrofit, on average (in the local market I am based) at least one radiator usually requires replacement, to enable a Heat Output operating at Flow Temperatures optimal for ASHP efficiency (optimal Co-Efficient of Performance) along with a Heat Pump rated Hot Water Cylinder. My house was built in 1890, and the Heat Pump works fine. However every installation has to be assessed prior, as the old methods of Boiler sizes being literally guessed no longer applies.

A Plastic Planet: It's time for activism on climate change and plastics to collide

The problem of domestic plastic waste disposal has two elements. The first is to persuade house holders to separate their plastic waste into a separate container, and secondly to oblige the waste disposal companies to separate this into true waste and recyclable products. This may be made mandatory There are, however some 39 companies, and little if any option to bury the non-recyclable material. Government policy is, however to put the realisation of such activity into private hands, indeed it is mandatory. This is totally unreal since the most profitable operations will be chosen, having a maximum return on investment, cherry picking, in fact. If this hurdle can be overcome, I would suggest that items such as the familiar milk bottle (HDLE), and the clear drinks bottle (PET) should be all be recycled. Products of indefinite or mixed composition, are most easily burned to generate power. The drafting of whole policy should be include staff with the relevant scientific knowledge and experience, qualifications absent from the upper echelons of Government, and sparse in business circles Strong science oriented action is required. Richard Phillips

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

To Keiron. It seems a big jump from ''only truly effective'' to ''absolutely useless''. I''ve heard the ''absolutely useless in existing stock, especially old stock'', many times in the past couple of years. But there is also plenty of empirical evidence that indicates the opposite. It''s not that long ago that I went to a relatively leaky, old listed house that was functioning perfectly well on GSHP. A fossil fuel back-up had been retained, but not used since the system was installed a few years previously. Seems to me that the key requirement is to get the specification right and then ensure that the system is installed as specified.

Urgent boost to offshore wind and CCS required for UK's net-zero target, report finds

Think we need to store a lot more than 176 tonnes of Carbon dioxide....we need the Severn barrage in the mix to help as well.

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Nigel - I can only quote from what other users of these systems have said. One lady I spoke to about an ASHP told me she was now paying 4 times as much in electricity to heat her home since the council installed an ASHP and the house was still cold and now damp. Hardly an effective heating system. Another person who installed ASHP has had it removed and the oil boiler reinstated as it was costing more to heat the home and hot water with the ASHP than with the oil boiler. Again hardly effective and their''s is a fairly new build house (less than 20 years old). I''ve heard other people say they wish they''d never installed ASHP and I know of one person who installed a GSHP only to find they now have to use the electric immersion to provide a tank full (200l) of hot water every day as the GSHP can''t heat the water enough. Properly designed, installed and with a properly insulated (PassivHaus?) building yes Heat Pumps are effective but in our ageing, leaky, poorly insulated housing stock (particularly council/housing association stock) they are proving to be increasingly bad choices and I am yet to be convinced how efficient they are in the Highlands where temperatures are often low throughout winter when you need the heating most.

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

To Keiron. It seems a big jump from ''only truly effective'' to ''absolutely useless''. I''ve heard the ''absolutely useless in existing stock, especially old stock'', many times in the past couple of years. But there is also plenty of empirical evidence that indicates the opposite. It''s not that long ago that I went to a relatively leaky, old listed house that was functioning perfectly well on GSHP. A fossil fuel back-up had been retained, but not used since the system was installed a few years previously. Seems to me that the key requirement is to get the specification right and then ensure that the system is installed as specified.

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Government urged to target one million heat pumps a year by 2035

Heat Pumps (be they Air, Ground or Water sourced) are only truly effective in properly built and insulated buildings with fit for purpose heating systems. They are absolutely useless in most of our current housing stock, even houses built to modern standards leak like a sieve. With virtually no quality control on builders there is no way to say for sure if insulation has been installed properly or that modern housing will actually meet the energy efficiency standards stated. Evidence shows that modern buildings can be twice as energy hungry as the certificate says. Older housing is even worse even if you do add double insulation. I have found at least 2 locations in my house where insulation is totally absent in areas where I have no chance of ever installing it retrospectively. Plus to fit a Heat Pump retrospectively in my house requires a complete overhaul of my "wet" system at a cost of about 18k for the GSHP and 5k for new pipes and radiators to give me a central heating system that may not actually heat my home enough. Then there is the elephant in the system with Heat Pumps. The fluid they use to extract the heat and transfer it is a Hydro Carbon. Or more correctly a Fluoridated Hydrocarbon (HFC). Made from oil and a potent Greenhouse Gas. While in normal use this is not a problem if it leaks it becomes a climate change problem. And 1 million Heat Pumps need a lot of refrigerant to work which means oil. So while they can be effective and are a source of low carbon heat they still need a lot of oil for their construction and operation so don''t call them No Carbon

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Nature conservation/restoration

BlackRock's climate u-turn and futuristic cities: The sustainability success stories of the week

This is the most exciting thing I have heard for a long time

Electric buses to operate in Glasgow for first time in 60 years

Sorry, but one swallow doesn''t make a summer. We need much faster action - two buses is really disappointing. Sure, we also need to test the vehicles, upgrade electricity connections at charging points, etc., so we cannot do a mass implementation from day 1, but this initiative in Glasgow just seems far too unambitious for 2020. I won''t push too hard that until it closed in 1962 after 90 years, Glasgow had one of the world''s largest (electric) tram networks, with over 225km of routes and as many as 1,000 tramcars...

New Starbucks-led behaviour change scheme aims to double reusable coffee cup uptake

Hi My name is Dennis Collins and I am the inventor of a process that can recycle a normal paper coffee cup 100% We are in the process of building a plant in Australia that can recycle 3.6 million coffee cups a year . The process can remove the plastic in one piece.This leaves the paper plastic free. Please have a look at our web site www.pvcseparation.com Regards Dennis

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Whilst I think plastics will continue to dominate the media, I think we should be devoting effort to nature conservation and restoration. Until we begin to restore our world to its more natural state (if that will ever be possible) we will continue down the rocky path to devastation. My personal view is that working on this element will naturally lead to improvements in other areas of concern. I am not a great fan of extensive banner-waving as this focuses on one aspect and the full picture is never truly given. We are now reading that alternatives to plastics can have a bigger impact than plastics. This is not a surprise to me but I do know it is to others. This is certainly going to be a challenging time and I would love to see people working together to rebuild our natural world.

Decade of ascendency: New hydrogen fuel cell capacity surpassed 1GW in 2019

It is actually DAVID Hart. With regard to hydrogen: HYDROGEN Much speculation has been made recently upon the possible advent of an economy using hydrogen as a primary source of energy. Consideration has, however, to be made of the physical characteristics of the gas before speculation upon its place as a fuel for any purpose. Occurrence. Hydrogen gas does not occur in nature. All gaseous hydrogen has been long lost from the planet, due to fundamentally low level of the planet's gravity. The most abundant source of hydrogen is as its oxide, water. The other principal source of combined hydrogen is in organic material. Organic chemistry has been described as the chemistry of carbon, but equally valid would be the title "The chemistry of Hydrogen". It is of primary importance, in the commercial use of hydrogen that it does not occur in its elementary state. All hydrogen, for whatever purpose, must be manufactured. This involves energy, in inefficiencies, which is never recovered in its use, and may be as great as 30-40%. Fossil fuels, however, occur naturally with their potential energy as fuels, already in them. The extraction and presentation of fossil fuels at the point of use, requires only a small fraction of the amount of the energy obtained in their use. This is a huge advantage. [It may be observed in passing, that the "Thorium Reactor", so often lauded in the Commons, suffers a similar disadvantage. Thorium is not a fissile element, but has to be irradiated with neutrons in a reactor to convert it into U233, a non-naturally occurring isotope of uranium. The fissile element of uranium used in all reactors as the fuel, is U235, when more is needed, it may be mined and separated. But there is much more thorium available that uranium. See also OKLO] Methods of isolation. All methods of isolation of hydrogen involve the expenditure of energy. The quantity of energy expended in any process will inevitably be greater than the energy recovered in its use. This use will almost uniquely be its oxidation to water. Electrolysis. The passage of a direct current through water containing an electrolyte, results, under controlled conditions, of about 80% of the electrical energy being used in the electrolytic, process. Gaseous hydrogen is evolved at cathode, and oxygen at the anode. Commercial units have been developed the using this process, producing hydrogen at high pressure. The high pressure is reflected in a higher consumption of power than would be required at normal pressure. There is no free lunch. The source of the electricity must, if decarbonisation of the fuel cycle is the intention. be from a non-carbonaceous source. Currently this is cited as a renewable generator, primarily wind. This has the disadvantage of wide variability. Any consequent production of hydrogen from a plant of given capacity is reflected as plant inefficiency. A demand lead source is thus to be preferred. The only candidate for this function is nuclear generation. Methane Reforming. This is a commercially widely used process to convert naturally occurring methane into carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This is achieved by reacting it with steam at a high temperature, followed by a lower temperature catalytic reaction. The CO2 is removed by pressure variable adsorption. Industrial quantities of hydrogen are produced by this process, but the disposal of the residual CO2 has to be addressed for these purposes. Again, it is an energy adsorbing process. Iodine/sulphur thermocycle This process involves the thermal decomposition of water into oxygen and hydrogen. The water is fed to a mixture of iodine and sulphur, which is successively heated and cooled between about 850oC and 450oC, water being added as it is decomposed. The cycle results in the evolution of oxygen at the lower temperature and hydrogen at the higher. In practice, the operation is complicated by the high temperatures demanding materials resistant to aggressive conditions. The potential benefit lies in the potential use of the high temperature reactor, as a pure heat source. Practical Considerations Its physical properties do not make hydrogen attractive as an energy source. When compared with natural gas, methane, volume for volume, it "contains" about only one third of the energy. As a consequence, a domestic central heating "boiler" would require three times the volume of gas. This would have to be reflected in either gas pipes to be replaced by larger diameters, or for pipe pressures to be increased, over the whole system. The latter would exacerbate both diffusive and simple leakage losses of an expensive fuel. The alternative is electrical central heating. Storage heaters may be used, or the more thermally efficient "heat pump". The scale of electricity generation needed for a country-wide adaption would require nuclear energy, such a scale of renewables is not practical. (Over and above this need there is the total replacement of petrol and diesel fuel) To supply Heathrow with hydrogen aircraft fuel, it has been estimated, would require reactors about three nuclear power stations, some 3GW. Water supply would have to be substantial. Liquefaction of hydrogen is difficult, the processes required falling into the extreme end of cryogenic techniques. Liquid hydrogen has a specific gravity of only 0.07, a large volume is needed for its storage. It is also the reason for proponents of its use as an energy source only ever quoting its energy density in terms of weight. Richard Phillips

Massive rise in EV charging points needed to reach EU climate goals, analysis finds

Or we all need to radically rethink our personal, private transportation options. Electric Vehicles are not the panacea everything says they are. They still need huge amounts of resources to build, including Rare Earth Elements and Hydrocarbons. They still need huge amounts of power generation to charge the batteries. They still create congestion. They still create particulate matter (tyre dust for one). Designing and building new single and twin seat vehicles (town cars, "smart" cars, bubble cars, scooters) instead of massive 7 seater people carriers and luxury 150mph SUVs would help but can we all "afford" to keep having a 5 seat vehicle for daily transport when the vast majority of journeys are within towns and cities and under 10 miles?

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Energy Storage

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

"It''s not simple" - companies being called out for making changes without checking the replacement is lower impact (eg recyclable plastic cups changed to non-recyclable paper or biodegradable)

Sustainable Business Covered podcast: The Net-Zero November business relay

Thank you for a great podcast. Very interesting.

Heatwaves in 2019 led to almost 900 extra deaths in England

Does this highlight the need to deal with "climate change" on two fronts? Not just trying to minimise our impact but also adapting our lives to manage the changes we are going to see. Making our homes more climate comfortable, flood and fire resistant. Not building on flood plains or areas at high risk of forest/bush fires. Planning for the future normal not the current normal.

British Airways begins offsetting domestic flight emissions in first step towards net-zero

The Range of an Electric Vehicle Could be Better than a Fossil Fuel One, Clean Long Range Transport is a Real Possibility Professor John Cushman, Co-founder, IFBattery A new type of electric vehicle power using refillable technology has taken another giant leap in advancing alternative energy with testing that shows it could provide enough energy to run a car for about 3,000 miles. The technology employs a novel type of flow battery that is being successfully tested in golf carts. The jump that this technology has made in the past two years is a testament to its value in changing the way we power our vehicles, said John Cushman, Purdue University Distinguished Professor of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences and a Professor of Mathematics. It s a game-changer for the next generation of electric cars because it does not require a very costly rebuild of the electric grid throughout the US. Instead, one could convert gas stations to pump fresh electrolyte and discard depleted electrolyte and convert oil-changing facilities to anode replacing stations. It is easier and safer to use and is more environmentally friendly than existing battery systems. The technology uses a patented technology that is safe and affordable for recharging electric and hybrid vehicle batteries by replacing the fluid in the batteries about every 300 miles through a process similar to refuelling a car at a gas station. Every 3,000 miles, the anode material is replaced, taking less time than is needed to do an oil change and costing about the same with an estimated cost of about $65. It is the full circle of energy with very little waste, Cushman said. IFBattery s components are safe enough to be stored in a family home, are stable enough to meet major production and distribution requirements and are cost-effective. The used battery fluids or electrolytes can be collected and taken to solar farm, wind turbine or hydroelectric plant to be reused again. It is the full circle of energy with very little waste, Cushman said. This makes for a lighter and more efficient EV, and I look forward to a production car coming out at soon as possible. It also means ships and lorries could become clean, and possibly aircraft too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=12&v=FdM2b4cZULg Yours faithfully Andy Kadir-Buxton ''RedRoseAndy''

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Or treatment of soils is too important to many of these issues to overlook. It''s crucial for carbon sequestration, food production, greenhouse gas emissions, conservation, water quality and management. And there is a hell of a lot of it !!

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Sustainable buildings and sustianable construction must be up there on the list

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

The implementation process for DRS in Scotland

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

The crisis in food systems goes well beyond simply the meat vs plant debate and goes to the fundamentals of how we produce our food. Much of the plant-based food we eat relies on commoditised industrial farming systems which promote monocultures and practices that degrade the soil, landscape and are significantly contributing to habitat and biodiversity loss. There needs to be a wholesale shift in approach to food production that promotes regenerative farming practices that nourish and protect supporting ecosystems, re-engages consumers with an understanding of how and where their food comes from and allows food producers to escape from the pressures of the stock broker and multinational corporate driven production paradigm by strengthening links between producers and consumers, fostering the appreciation of food value and re-embedding externalised costs into the system.

Oxford unveils proposals for city centre zero-emissions zone

The bus company deferral to 2035 is understandable if Gloucester Green - the hub for buses such as the Oxford Tube to London and X5 to MK/Cambridge is inside the zone. Otherwise, it looks rather unambitious.

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

I agree with the comments that Climate will probably continue to dominate, and within that braod topic denial (by the Trump/Bolsonaro axis) and carbon offsetting (pros/cons) will be important sub-themes. Sadly, I don''t think energy efficiency will be!

New Starbucks-led behaviour change scheme aims to double reusable coffee cup uptake

So why do Starbucks automatically put your coffee in a disposable cup even when you tell them you are sitting in? The first cup should be a ceramic one, the customer should not have to chose a proper cup they should have to ask for a disposable one and the fee to have one should be 1 not 5p. Perhaps we all need to stop and really enjoy our coffee instead of drinking on the run or in the car (itself an offence if you are the driver). Stop and savour the flavour of a hand crafted coffee from a proper mug and enjoy the moment.

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Energy. Wasted energy equals HEAT which equates to increased temperature. If the UK can cut its energy demand by 10% that would save the equivalent energy of Hinkley C

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

The Climate crisis

VOTE: What will be the defining sustainability issue of 2020?

Climate denial must be a topic in its own right. The Australian bushfires, the continued denials by the Australian government is testament to a topic that is not yet resolved. Accepting climate change makes all the other issues in your survey relevant and includes the political will for significant and valuable change. Continued ignorance, denials and lack of action makes every other issue irrelevant. In 2019 many people put their hopes and dreams of a future onto the shoulders of a 16 year old girl because the leaders we elect or want to believe in are not doing enough. Just that fact is obscene. This is the only topic for 2020 - for COP26.

Electric car registrations surged to record levels in 2019

When will Edie recognise that electric cars, especially powered by NMC type lithium ion batteries are not at all "environmental". Solution mining of lithium in the so-called "lithium triangle" is destroying wild life and human livelihoods in South America. Mining cobalt in the DCR is an environmental catastrophe. At least, Edie should report the facts surrounding its "green" causes! https://www.wired.co.uk/article/lithium-batteries-environment-impact

Royal Dutch Shell may fail to reach green energy targets

The problem is that in order to build solar panels or wind turbines you need oil based products. To maintain wind turbines takes oil and oil based chemicals, particularly offshore wind turbines where maintenance staff have to travel by boat or helicopter to service them. Even insulating electric cables takes oil based chemicals so does building the casing of electric batteries and a lot of the interior of an electric vehicle. And Greta''s transatlantic yacht used a huge amount of oil based materials in its hull, sails, rigging, fridge, life saving equipment. Damned if you do and damned if you don''t for the oil companies. While we can''t continue to burn it as a fuel we still need it for everything we want and need in our everyday life.

Meet edie's 30 Under 30 Class of 2019: Eilidh Johnston, Laing O'Rourke

Horizon scanning: Eight innovations set to shake-up sustainability in 2020

It seems to be little appreciated that hydrogen has drawbacks! Primarily, this is its source; it does not occur naturally as a free gas. To obtain natural gas, with a high calorific value, we drill a hole in the ground and obtain a supply of energy much greater than that required to drill the hole. To obtain a supply of hydrogen, ALL the hydrogen has to be manufactured from energy which we have to generate. This involves inefficiency losses, as well as just the equivalent amount of energy in the amount of hydrogen generated. Its use involves further inefficiency losses. Overall it is an energy expensive route. It is merely a storage system, not energy beneficial. And it will prove very expensive. Like CCS, storage, and the never-mentioned-addenda to renewables, it will be very costly. In addition, volume for volume, when compared with natural gas, it has only about only third of the NG calorific value. I wonder whether the senior businessmen of the organisations involved are fully aware of the down-sides revealed by the science and engineering involved??? Certainly politicians and the media are woefully uninformed. I suppose my next stop will be in the Tower!! Richard Phillips

Shipping giants debut LNG and hydrogen vessels

It seems to be little appreciated that hydrogen has drawbacks! Primarily, this is its source; it does not occur naturally as a free gas. To obtain natural gas, with a high calorific value, we drill a hole in the ground and obtain a supply of energy much greater than that required to drill the hole. To obtain a supply of hydrogen, ALL the hydrogen has to be manufactured from energy which we have to generate. This involves inefficiency losses, as well as just the equivalent amount of energy in the amount of hydrogen generated. Its use involves further inefficiency losses. Overall it is an energy expensive route. It is merely a storage system, not energy beneficial. And it will prove very expensive. Like CCS, storage, and the never-mentioned-addenda to renewables, it will be very costly. In addition, volume for volume, when compared with natural gas, it has only about only third of the NG calorific value. I wonder whether the senior businessmen of the organisations involved are fully aware of the down-sides revealed by the science and engineering involved??? Certainly politicians and the media are woefully uninformed. I suppose my next stop will be in the Tower!! Richard Phillips

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

Ken I know what you mean but that is the risk one takes as a scientist, and a Geologist at that. The "greens" mean well and have the right idea at heart but as we know the "road to hell is paved with good intentions". Unless it is scientifically and engineeringly sound it doesn''t matter how green an idea sounds a bad idea is a bad idea no matter what the "colour" of it. We have to be wary of "knee jerk" reactions as when you look closer often the so called "green" option is worse environmentally than the problem it is trying to solve (Electric Vehicles may be one of those cases in my humble opinion). Always good to know there are others out there, like me, who aren''t going to take "green" propaganda at face value but will research and look at the big picture.

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

Keiron, good to meet a kindred spirit, when I am normally written off as an out of touch Neanderthal. I just wish those of a green persuasion had some concept of scale, and the implications of what they wish for. Must try harder to convince...

UK's first grid-injected hydrogen trials begin in Staffordshire

Ken I wish!! You are right though that our leaders generally have no or little scientific or engineering background. The have advisers but then decide to ignore the advice and do what they want anyway. We are the willing, lead by the unknowing, doing the impossible, for the ungrateful as the saying goes. It is through organisations like Edie and others that we might, possibly, have a chance to inform not just our MPs but also the "sheeple" that not everything green is really green and that science, particularly the laws of physics, can''t be changed. Yes Energy can neither be created nor destroyed, merely changed