Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Lush to open UK's first plastic-free cosmetics store in Manchester

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

To report a 49MW battery construction, is to state its capability to deliver 49MW, but for how long?. A hour perhaps, one twentieth of a standard power station, for just one hour. Certainly useful frequency support for variable, unreliable renewable energy generation, but for supplying power to customers, meaningless. Power stations capable of generating dispatchable power, the only type built before chaotic renewables, never needed any such support. It is only renewables that have spawned an avalanche of supportive devices, frequency and voltage controllers, phase correction, all very high power, solid state, and prices to match. Previously simply not required. and the customer pays. Un-itemised on the bill, for good reason. Richard Phillips

One week left to register for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

what are the impacts on our environment by using biodegradables and plant based polymers e.g increased CO2 through processing or land use, land use, pesticides, contamination of recycling, water use, communities use of land for food

Defra launches ?5m food redistribution scheme to help businesses slash waste

Let s get this clear: giving surplus food to charities will not deliver SDG 2.1. Nor will it deliver SDG 12.3 to halve food waste which is mostly post retail with some further upstream Let s not institutionalise this thinking or create mechanisms which perpetuate both waste and poverty

UK's first floating tidal stream turbine to be built in Scotland

All tidal devices are intermittent. How many times has this to be said before it sinks in. Electrical generating devices that cannot supply power, up to design capacity, on demand, are almost useless. Quotation of MWhours is all but meaningless. Full stop. Richard Phillips

Hydrogen bikes and electric 'delivery dogs': The best green innovations of CES 2019

Great!

One week left to register for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

Why are the major European food wholesale and retail supermarkets so slow to accept replacement of plastic packaging by sustainable and re-usable material such, for example as the stainless steel bottles for fresh water that are successfully being adopted in Australia and East Asia? Our oceans and rivers are contaminated by plastic bottles, food bags and other plastic rubbish that is poisoning sea life.

MPs call for a new Minister for Hunger to tackle food insecurity 'scandal'

Should this not say "nutrient poor but calorie rich"?

Speaker line-up confirmed for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

I have registered for this because of my interest in this topic but it clashes with a meeting.

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

Apologies for my faulty memory: sea level rise running at 3mm per year at present, not 8! 30cm a century. Not exactly a cause for panic!

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

If we produced the same energy output for each of the last 150 years, then the energy that could be taken up by the oceans would be 150 times what we produce each year now. But these researchers are claiming it is 1,000 times as much as our annual energy output. Two possibilities: we used to produce much more energy than we do now. No so, especially if you go back 150 years!!! Secondly, this figure is wrong and it is amazing that it can be published in a respectable journal. What is not surprising is that it was published in the Guardian, a newspaper that has lost all sense of critical examination of any scare about global warming! Sea level rise is running at 8mm a year and that rate is barely increasing year on year. And half of that may be due to the land level sinking - not easy to stop!

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

IAIN WHYTE ESQ / related to Fred Whyte had consultancy in London? in any case here here! PHIPIP ASPINALL we and our clients have the same problem

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

Maybe BEIS should be fitted with a smart meter to increase its intelligence. Or perhaps they just have as their ludicrous decision has been reversed. Can we have any confidence that BEIS is fit for purpose

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

More confusion and another Energy Minister who talks about the future rather than sorting out the present problem. Exported electricity was supposed to be measured by the smart meters that everyone is paying for through energy taxation on the bills but they don''t work!

Two-thirds of Britain's recyclable plastic packaging is not being recycled, finds Co-op

Recycling is crucial, more consumers need to be encouraged to participate. I have taken it seriously for years, I did live in Germany for a while where they do take it seriously, still room for improvement of course but leaps and bounds ahead of the UK. I have always washed my recycling with the washing up since the introduction of recycling bins but living in a block of flats I often see contaminated waste in the recycling bins. The health risks to our environment and all the life it supports should be reason enough to improve our habits regarding plastics and our use and disposal of them. When the plastics industry itself is alarmed enough to explore and invest in improving recycling rates we should take notice and do whatever we can to contribute.

Manchester commits to making all new buildings 'net-zero' by 2028

At last! Come on Central Government. But I hope that this does not provide an excuse for excessive rises in house prices.

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

The data provided leaves this item quite meaningless. To quote only the mega-wattage of an installation is merely to make a statement about the amount power it can supply per second. What is missing is a figure for the length of time for which that power can continue to be provided. Batteries, even big ones, run down and out. Without an indication of the number of hours for which power can be provided, the information is meaningless. Mention is made of the function of the batteries to stabilise frequency. This is a light duty by comparison with the provision of industrial scale power. But this function is entirely beyond any battery installation when considered over the scale of five or more windless days, as occurred at the beginning of June last year. Batteries are a business project promoted on the ignorance of the political world. As ever. Richard Phillips

Energy regulations: Coming to a home near you - The WSP Blog

Question, if I may, regarding the efficiency of Heat Pumps. As they use an electric pump and compressor to extract the heat from whichever medium is being used as the source how efficient are they in real terms? IE how much extra heat can they extract above what is required to operate the pump and compressor in real world conditions (say in London and in Glasgow). Especially Air Sourced when the air temperature is zero degrees or below. How much heat do they extract from such cold air and how much is an effect of the pump and compressor running? I''m not anti Heat Pump, in fact I strongly support development of Water Source Heat Pumps to tap the warm waters on the West Coast, but I don''t think Air and Ground Source are as efficient and cost effective as they are sometimes made out to be.

Why tree planting should be part of your climate change strategy - The Woodland Trust blog

Not just trees but any green leafed plant. Think roof top gardens, think hanging gardens, think vertical gardens. Window boxes, hedges and anywhere that green leafed plants can be grown should be encouraged. Especially in towns and cities where they also have the benefit of helping to clean the air.

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

Longannet, Didcot anyone? Have to ask how long this facility can provide power for. 49MW sounds impressive but if it only lasts a couple of hours it doesn''t really mean much. If it can provide meaningful supply for days then that is something else. Then of course you have to factor in how long it takes to recharge

President Trump's environmental agenda - the story so far

No comment - words fail me...

Veganuary: Why meat-free meals could be the key to tackling climate challenges

All these new vegan products are great (I am a vegetarian myself) but what are the health and environmental implications? For example, almond milk from a dry region like California might be worse for the environment long-term. And vegan products are processed and it is not clear what they contain. Is anyone keeping an eye on potential rebound effects?

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

@Iain - I checked the performance of my EvoHome TRVs against a digital thermometer (well 2 different ones) and they were all within 0.5C. Not bad considering the TRVs are right next to the very hot radiator. Additionally we have 3 "room" thermostats to allow guests to control the temperature in the guest bedrooms which read the air temperature well away from the rads and these also show the same 0.5C tolerance. Plus with the EvoHome TRVs you can calibrate them to a know room temperature. But you are very correct in saying that we should all check how accurate our thermostats actually are. With the hot water I have a 300litre tank, which is 50% bigger than your standard domestic HW tank. The main thermostatic control is located about 1/3rd of the way up and I have a digital thermometer here to give me a read out of the tank temp at this location. This one reads 51C when the thermostat clicks off and the Motorised Valve closes. My second digital thermometer utilises the unused upper immersion element to read the temperature inside the tank. There is no thermostat at this location 2/3rd of the way up so I positioned the thermoprobe inside the tube for the immersion thermostat (with me?) so I get a very accurate temperature reading. This normally reads 56C when the tank is full. The very top of the tank (measured using an IR thermometer on the take off pipes) reads over 60C so covering the legionella problem. Plus we do a manual cycle with the thermostat periodically. With the EvoHome H/W controller you can cut a hole in the tank insulation and strap the sensor to the tank so theoretically can position it anywhere you chose or there is a probe sensor so it you have a spare immersion tube you might find this an option.

New Year Honours 2019: Sustainability champions make Queen's list

Ummm...... IPCC special report ref COP 24 states that we need to cut fossil fuel use by 50% by 2030 and zero by 2050. The contributions of these individuals to such sustainability is ............?

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I have yet to get my new heating system fully up and running (doing a barn conversion) but have most of the components in place. One thing I have found is that the digital room thermostats are not well adjusted when supplied. I''ve checked mine against a pair of calibrated mercury-in-glass thermometers and found that they over-read by between 1 and 2.1 degrees. The floor and remote air probes also give different results even when placed next to each other. Clearly the thermistors have a production spread and the thermostats don''t seem to be set up accurately at the factory - although there is a calibration facility in the thermostat. Most people won''t think to check their thermostats. When their display resolves to 20.1 degree that''s what most people assume they are measuring. There is the dilemma now as to whether I leave them over-reading by 2 degrees so that people see them reading 22 when it''s actually 20deg and saving me money! I''m looking forward to seeing how the ''optimum start'' facility works as with UFH the response times are long but you need thermostats which work on a small differential to keep an even temperature. I also have a challenge with a large open plan area having 2 UFH zones under engineered wood flooring with a maximum surface temperature limit of 27 degree (measured using a floor probe) plus a large area under york stone slabs - think 24 hour response times! and an area of clay pamments which probably respond faster than the wooden area. So 1, 2,3 or 4 thermostats? and there is also a woodburner going in as an alternative to TV. I''m convinced that comfort is more important than temperature. I''ve not cracked the hot water yet. The insulated cylinder has its own thermostat (fairly crude) but at the bottom of the tank and It would be more useful to have one half way up as well. One thing on water temp, most of the time 50 to 55 deg will be OK, 60 degree for a weekly Legionella cycle but if you have additional demand e.g. guests you can push the temperature up to 70deg for a couple of hours when there is ''peak shower demand'' and effectively gain a larger tank.

Bill Gates: Nuclear power 'ideal' for tackling climate challenges

"...Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) has predicted that renewable energy sources will account for around three-quarters of the expected $10trn global investment into power generating technologies between now and 2040..." Ignoring burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactors could be the downfall of much investment in renewable energy sources. 2030 will see the FOAK, operational, GE-Hitachi BWRX-30 and a few years later, it s the NOAK at an overnight cost of $2,000/kW. This overnight rate could choke off investment in renewables and might even signal the collapse of renewable technologies including the multitude of proposed storage technologies in any nation with a sound grid network. A single BWRX-300, will have an overnight cost of 468 million in the UK and will deliver 142 million MWh of dividend-paying, 24/7 units of electricity. Whitelee Windfarm, the UK''s biggest version of the most cost-effective renewable technology onshore wind cost 600 million and will deliver 32 million MWh of dividend-paying, intermittent units of electricity. Investing 28% more for just 22.5% of the earnings would clearly be insane. But the killer punch is the declaration from the USA s NRC that the Emergency Planning Zone [EPZ] for SMRs can be at the boundary fence of the tiny site. This Forbes article makes it clear that SMRs can be sited close to population centres. Search for: "How Far Do You Have To Run After A Small Modular Nuclear Meltdown" So this one BWRX-300 could supply all of the electricity domestic; commercial; industrial to a UK city the size of Leicester and also decarbonise much of the heating. That''s twice the bang for our bucks. It would be politically unconscionable, to a cash-strapped electorate, for any government to continue with a policy that ignores developments in advanced nuclear reactors and continues with a policy of directing investment towards renewables.

Bill Gates: Nuclear power 'ideal' for tackling climate challenges

"...Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) has predicted that renewable energy sources will account for around three-quarters of the expected $10trn global investment into power generating technologies between now and 2040..." Ignoring burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactors could be the downfall of much investment in renewable energy sources. 2030 will see the FOAK, operational, GE-Hitachi BWRX-30 and a few years later, it s the NOAK at an overnight cost of $2,000/kW. This overnight rate could choke off investment in renewables and might even signal the collapse of renewable technologies including the multitude of proposed storage technologies in any nation with a sound grid network. A single BWRX-300, will have an overnight cost of 468 million in the UK and will deliver 142 million MWh of dividend-paying, 24/7 units of electricity. Whitelee Windfarm, the UK''s biggest version of the most cost-effective renewable technology onshore wind cost 600 million and will deliver 32 million MWh of dividend-paying, intermittent units of electricity. Investing 28% more for just 22.5% of the earnings would clearly be insane. But the killer punch is the declaration from the USA s NRC that the Emergency Planning Zone [EPZ] for SMRs can be at the boundary fence of the tiny site. This Forbes article makes it clear that SMRs can be sited close to population centres. Search for: "How Far Do You Have To Run After A Small Modular Nuclear Meltdown" So this one BWRX-300 could supply all of the electricity domestic; commercial; industrial to a UK city the size of Leicester and also decarbonise much of the heating. That''s twice the bang for our bucks. It would be politically unconscionable, to a cash-strapped electorate, for any government to continue with a policy that ignores developments in advanced nuclear reactors and continues with a policy of directing investment towards renewables.

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Well, dear reader, the new year has started and the evidence is in. So what''s the result of my smart heating system? I estimate based on the purchase of heating oil from 2017 vs our purchases in 2018 that we bought at least 500 litres less oil year on year. That is about a 17% reduction in energy used. I''m pretty happy with that figure and I think we can hit 20% with a bit of fine tuning of the system settings. I''m not sure if I will add the H/W to the EvoHome system as I have optimised that quite well just by using 2 digital "fridge" thermometers to accurate monitor the water temperature and adjust the hot water tank thermostat accordingly (it was set at a shockingly high 70C initially!!). If you are thinking about upgrading your central heating control system I would definitely recommend the EvoHome

Scotland receives green light for large-scale water source heat pump project

This really is excellent news and a welcome change from the Scottish Government''s rabid focus on wind. Given the west coast of Scotland is bathed in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream / North Atlantic Drift we should be building on this on a much larger scale to harness all the gazillions joules of heat energy on our doorsteps.

In numbers: The growing consumer demand for sustainable packaging

Plastic depositing scheme by Iceland is highly commendable but only half of the solution to the global scurge of plastic pollution. The other - positive - solution is to provide an alternative packaging method for - firstly - liquid products. This we are now doing with cunsumate success in Australia, Hong Kong and , shortly, in Ireland and the US, not to mention under consideration by other UK retailers. Our company, with factories in SE Asia are producing renewable, sustainable bottles made of stainless steel and the innovative dispensers (kiosks) for providing still or sparkling fresh water. For any retailing companies interested in joining us in this environmental revolution, please contact me, Prof. Dr. Alexander Schoen: dr.schoen2@btinternet.com flag as inappropriate

Iceland collects more than 300,000 plastic bottles in reverse vending trial

Plastic depositing scheme by Iceland is highly commendable but only half of the solution to the global scurge of plastic pollution. The other - positive - solution is to provide an alternative packaging method for - firstly - liquid products. This we are now doing with cunsumate success in Australia, Hong Kong and , shortly, in Ireland and the US, not to mention under consideration by other UK retailers. Our company, with factories in SE Asia are producing renewable, sustainable bottles made of stainless steel and the innovative dispensers (kiosks) for providing still or sparkling fresh water. For any retailing companies interested in joining us in this environmental revolution, please contact me, Prof. Dr. Alexander Schoen: dr.schoen2@btinternet.com

In 2019, businesses will need to embrace sustainability, or risk being left behind - The HP Blog

It may be a small thing, but I would take more notice of HP''s views if they made it easier (and cheaper) to recycle inkjet cartridges. More positively, I''m intrigued by the idea that 3D printing may be beneficial. Historically we have been told that globalised production - while adding to transport emissions shipping goods around - was often better overall, owing to the ability to invest in more efficient manufacturing processes. It may well be that 3D printing has turned this on its head, though if the raw materials for printing are themselves shipped from (say) China, I suspect that any benefits may be marginal. But I would love it if HP could share some properly computed carbon footprinting data on this subject.

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

Just so Hugh! The electricity generated by renewables HAS to be accepted into the grid in preference to fossil or nuclear generation. By law. This takes no regard of demand, indeed renewables CANNOT respond to demand. Note that biomass generates less electricity per kg of CO2 generated, than pure coal. But money talks, as long as subsidies are available, renewables will be with us. Richard Phillips

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

No mention in this article of the huge increase of imports from the Netherlands, France and Belgium needed to keep the UK system balanced

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

VOTE: Which sustainability issue will have its 'plastics moment' in 2019?

I think Biodiversity should be on this list. The protection of ecosystems and the interconnected nature of valuing the natural capital contained within them is surely an issue of catacysmically huge proportions.

VOTE: Which sustainability issue will have its 'plastics moment' in 2019?

I propose another huge Sustainability issue, with added negative impact on The Circular Economy. Hard water results in massive wasting of Energy & Water, significant increases in breakdowns and equipment/production downtime and more importantly shortening the lifetime of appliances, fixtures and fittings and water-fed equipment. Everything so damaged has to be replaced. Just think for a moment of a simple electric kettle. Somewhere in the world someone has to extract raw materials and process them into metal, plastic, rubber, etc components, assemble them, ship the finished product, transport and store it, etc. The Carbon Footprint of this is huge. And yet every nation on earth turns a blind eye to the problem. John Thompson (www.electronicdescaler.com)

VOTE: Which sustainability issue will have its 'plastics moment' in 2019?

Why when it''s been identified as a bigger polluter is the issue of car tyres not being addressed. It''s a bigger issue that microfires from clothing

Horizon scanning: Nine innovations set to shake-up sustainability in 2019

Really good innovations and if I could to add one more which reduces 30% of global carbon emissions and waste it would be zero carbon passiv pod buildings

From puddings to packaging: Inside the UK's Christmas waste problem

All Christmas waste should be sent to energy from waste incinerators so that we receive much needed electricity into the grid whilst eliminating a) landfill b) energy wasted in recycling the materials and c) contamination from waste that we know the public is too damn lazy or disinterested to sort. Burning it at high temperature with cleaning on the efflux gives us useful electricity and heat whilst eliminating the waste completely!

Could this MDF recycling innovation solve a circular economy conundrum for retailers?

I would be interested in hearing if this technology is currently available in Australia and if so, where.

Solar households expected to give away power to energy firms

@Iain - if I added in the cost of a "powerwall" then it was looking at 18 years to payback. Add in replacing the Inverter at least once and 20+ years to pay back made the entire thing a non starter. OK when I did my calculations initially I didn''t include any correction for inflation and for electricity price inflation but even after allowing for 3%CPI and 6% electricity inflation I was still looking at 12-15years to pay back a standard 4kw array plus storage with FIT and Export. I figure it a better investment to make my home as energy efficient as possible and switch suppliers on a regular basis. As more and more of the "green" energy deals are becoming the better offers I will eventually switch to one of these but at present E.ON are the cheapest deal in town (much to my surprise given all the bad press the Big 6 get).

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

Interesting. As long as people drink Coca Cola then co2 will be released so although this process is only borrowing it from the atmosphere at least it is not adding it. And producing it on site without transport issues rather than in a plant from methane or even from flue gas at thermal energy plant has to be a plus. I guess if the economics didn t stack up then Coca Cola bottlers would not even consider it. Slightly dodgier environmentally if the energy from the process is from a co2 dirty source but Iceland and Switzerland are clean so all good.

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

Agreed, Colin, so what is the point of all this?? It surely cannot be economic to construct this elaborate equipment just to re-use CO2, it will take forever to just to offset the plant construction, as you say. Richard Phillips

AB InBev signs deal to source 100% renewable electricity in UK

Great first step, now start delivering them in Biomethane fuelled trucks to make that part carbon neutral as well....

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

Think you are all missing the elephant in the room! This is not carbon capture and storage this is carbon capture and reuse. As soon as the drink is opened the Carbon dioxide is released back to atmosphere and that which is consumed comes out to atmosphere when the person drinking it Belches or burps. This is purely a temporary reassignment of Carbon dioxide no reduction in atmospheric levels, then there is the energy required to make it in the first place which adds to C02 etc....

Solar households expected to give away power to energy firms

What vested interests are in play here I wonder?

EU forges deal on coal phase-out, with special Polish clause

I am surprised that it is just Poland, what about Germany??? Richard Phillips

Solar households expected to give away power to energy firms

If excess cannot be sold, it looks like the end of road to me. Richard Phillips

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

Just take a look at the Climeworks website, the plant required for this process, hundreds if not thousands of tons of steel, banks of electric fans, reprocessing of adsorbents, all to process air with 0.04% CO2. The quoted tonnage of CO2 obtained is small, in the thousands. Plants working on flue gases are still uneconomic, this, working on marginal concentrations must be highly uneconomic. It has long been axiomatic in the field of technology, that the foundation science of any proposed scheme of work has to be demonstrably true, and that the ensuing engineering has to produce an economically viable process. I can believe that politicians or scientifically na ve businessmen, sensing profits from the public purse, may be enthusiastic. But not me Richard Phillips

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

Carbon capture is an interesting choice and that is fine, but the worst part of the process is the depletion of groundwater resources that belong to communities.

European Coca-Cola bottler to pioneer carbon capture technology

What a great idea. I''m surprised that the EU has not mandated that only CCS sourced CO2 can be used in drinks and other commercial uses e.g. fire extinguisher production and welding gases.

Solar households expected to give away power to energy firms

Fully agree with Keiran. Until domestic storage batteries become available at reasonable price there seems little point in installing PV just to give away most of power generated for free. So that''s the end of another industry just as a new climate change agreement has been signed. I still reckon that solar thermal to heat your hot water is a better bet for most people and does not mess up the roofline of the house to anything like the same degree as solar PV.

Solar households expected to give away power to energy firms

Well that''s me definitely not putting solar panels on my south facing roof. They were going to take 12years to pay back with the FIT and Export payments so now I''d be expected to give my power away for nothing makes me doubly certain I''m not going to waste thousands on them.

Waitrose targets glitter phase-out by 2020

@Roger - you beat me to it :-) Surely Waitrose/John Lewis Partnership could end the use of glitter for next Christmas? They have an ability to set a trend that others follow and have done just that in the past, for instance their 5 year warranty on electricals, so maybe next years Christmas campaign could be about a sustainable Christmas and forcing us to take stock of the waste that this holiday brings about. Don''t wait JLP but force the issue.

Offshore wind capacity in 2018 'smashes' previous record

Capacity is nothing without the system in place to smooth the variabilities of wind generated power. We could have 300GW of capacity but would still have to fire up gas or coal stations when the wind doesn''t blow. More investment is needed in grid scale storage to back up wind and solar before we can really celebrate "smashing records". By grid scale I don''t mean chemical batteries either as they have a limited lifespan before needing to be replaced, we need sustainable long term storage which means more Pumped Storage Hydro on the scale of Dinorwig

Government to fund network of 'smart' domestic EV chargers

Wow another "easy peasey Brexit" these politicians can only see in one dimension. Clean electricity for recharging BEVs pipe dream at present. Pure fantasy when we get to millions of BEVs and NOTE we have not even started to consider E.HGVs. The "Myth buster" from the National Grid, which was anything but a mb, made it clear that there would be a need fro greater use of Natural Gas fired power stations. Natural Gas being mainly Methane is most certainly NOT CLEAN and the Dutch Courts have already ruled that Shell has to stop using the term as it is completely untrue. There is also the case that some houses have multiple EVs ?? The BIG question really is, "Why are people not looking for something different to grid based electricity, why not develop Low-cost Hydrogen produced on Board the EVs ? I say the same that I did about Brexit, "The People making the Big Statements do not have a Clue about the Realities of implementation".

Waitrose targets glitter phase-out by 2020

Why not next year? It is always sad to get something from a well meaning friend covered in glitter and have never had the courage to even point out that glitter is not a good idea. Hopefully others will follow Waitrose so I wont have these feelings in the future.

Resources and Waste Strategy: Green business community reacts

It seems that these proposals are approaching the German scheme which has been in place for over 25 years. There is enough experience there just to adopt it 100% without the unnecessary and damaging step of privatising the administration which causes a lot of unnecessary bureaucracy. However in the UK we like to over manage things so the end result will be an improvement but not the slick system that it could have been. What a good time to be converging with Europe. Still so far I haven''t heard anybody calling it "world leading" which helps keep the mince pies down.

Landsec leads industry-wide coffee cup recycling scheme

There is a guy in Australia that can recycle coffee cups 100% Why not talk to him?

Nations agree on Paris Agreement rulebook, fail on climate ambition

We do not have time for compromises - the environment, ecosystems and species on the verge of extinction do not understand politics

Sugarcane shoes and silicon energy storage: The best green innovations of the week

Any material will begin to glow as it reaches a high temperature, silicon is not miraculous in this respect. At elevated temperatures, certainly above 1,000 C, everything acts as a black body radiator. Indeed the radiation is proportional to the forth power of the absolute temperature. Rather more information is needed before any judgement can be made, but I am very sceptical Richard Phillips

Wales pledges to phase-out fossil fuels in favour of renewables

Both Ken and Kieron are absolutely correct in their analyses. The problem faced by the UK Governments, both national and provincial, is that they lack, completely, any ability to understand the science and engineering of energy generation and distribution. They cannot seem even to understand that wind power can drop to a negligible level for days on end, that solar is for daytime only, hydropower is good only if rainfall has been sufficient, that wave energy is as intermittent as the wind which causes it, and tidal power is available for only some 14 hours out of 24. NO RENEWABLE IS AVAILABLE ON DEMAND. Storage for industrial amounts of power is not available and would be prohibitively expensive. The perfect power supplier is the fast reactor, but mention that to a politician is to invite mental paralysis. I can find no record of any scientific or engineering academic study for either Lesley Griffiths or Haf Elgar. But I stand to be corrected. In any case I back my own knowledge, from 35 years at AERE Harwell, and close following of energy matters over the last 30 years, against any Parliamentarian. Just a little jaundiced!!!!! Richard Phillips

Disruptive plastics firm Polymateria backed by £1m Innovate UK funding

This is just going to make recyclable plastics unrecyclable. I can''t believe that Innovate UK are putting UK taxpayers'' money into this. Don''t they talk to people who are at the sharp end, ie recyclers?

Costa: PRN reform, not latte levy, needed to tackle coffee cup waste

Being able to wash your re-usable cup at the retailer might also help take-up. I wouldn''t want to drink my americano or espresso out of the same unwashed cup I had my cappucino in. There are many people who are not office-based with access to those facilities, or just out for the day. Re-use should be the aim - not single use. Eliminate - a UK first said in a Dalek voice.

Boots reaches carbon goal three years early

Keep on blogging! It s getting through the tough times that make you stronger and then the good times will follow, keep writing about your experiences and we should all pull together. http://www.axivafilters.com

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

@John Mathias - yes - as mentioned in the fourth paragraph, they''re accepting packaging from all brands.

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

@Tim Beesley - details of collection point locations and of the postage address can be found at https://www.terracycle.co.uk/en-GB/brigades/crisppacket

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

I presume they''re going to recycle any brand of crisp packet that is deposited at their recycling points and not just their own?

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

I presume they going to recycle any brand of crisp packet that is deposited at their recycling points and not just their own?

Sky confirmed for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

As the discussion is on single use plastics, you will notice in the Asian Plastics & Packaging Agreement that we take 5 years to address this issue with suitable alternatives. 1. Asia is complex and fragmented with different layers and levels of development. 2. Solutions need to be carefully thought through and include the supply chain of all and every viable solution. Lord Deben summed it up nicely at the Packaging Innovation Conference in London, September 2018. "There is no silver bullet to replacing single-use plastics which would appease both consumers and policymakers in the short term while generating long-term sustainability benefits. We cannot risk sustainability professionals who want to replace their company s plastic packaging ranges with potentially disastrous alternatives due to a lack of clear policy guidance on the best solutions to the plastic problem. Without an integrated answer, people go rushing after what seems to be an easy solution. For Circular Economy Asia, our next step in this process is to define, through a collaborative approach, what is a sustainable and circular plastics & packaging industry. Once this is done we will have a foundation to build upon and have a much better chance of reviewing and ideating the problem of single use plastics. Of course our peers and all the work already done by many people and companies will contribute to our work. There is no need to reinvent the wheel.

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

Well collecting them is a start I suppose and at least they are being diverted/prevented from contributing to marine pollution and general litter but a circular economy solution this treatment is not. In reality it is just another stop on the way to the tip...surface landfill by any other name. If we''re not careful we''ll be buried in plastic wood. #SurfaceLandfill

H&M holds fair wage summit after criticism of supply chain pay policies

Anyone with any knowledge of H&M''s supply chain factories knows that this report is a complete lie. They claim that 100% of their supplier factories have "democratically elected worker representation". In China, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Myanmar? Please don''t take us for fools. Visit any factory in Vietnam and you will find the factory-level union executive committee composed of the HR director as chairperson and the other seats filled by top supervisors. The same is true in China. In Bangladesh, if there is a worker representative body, they are chosen by management and function to prevent authentic worker representation by a labor union. The claims about wages are similarly false and misleading. 49% above the national minimum wage in Bangladesh is nowhere near a living wage. 24% above the national minimum in Cambodia is nowhere near a living wage. This is self-serving BS, and H&M must know it. They are using their Global Framework Agreement and the ACT process as a pretense, while for five years, H&M has claimed to be doing something about wages, and still the workers are malnourished and overworked. Let them have real unions, let them bargain for their wages, and you will see real progress. Until H&M does that, all their words are empty.

Sky confirmed for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

Dear Edie, Here in Asia we are pushing for a different approach to targets, elimination, bans and taxation. It''s a much more wholistic approach that begins with securing the supply chain from source. The ultimate aim is to establish a sustainable and circular plastics & packaging industry not just to achieve targets. We have published the Asian Plastics & Packaging Agreement with the first update that begins the process to ensure a more robust and achievable agreement. It is designed to ensure that even those companies that do not sign up for targets can still participate and take advantage of the benefits associated with a secure and certified supply chain. It also aims to create a plastics & packaging industry we can trust. You can download all the documents plus read the latest update from our website: http://www.circulareconomyasia.org/asia-plastic-packaging-agreement/. This will be a long slow process and Circular Economy Asia is in it for the long haul. But the continual discussion on the elimination of single use plastics is simply putting your finger into a leaking dyke. Adrienna Zsakay Executive Director Circular Economy Asia

Costa: PRN reform, not latte levy, needed to tackle coffee cup waste

Eliminate, reduce, recycle, we need consumers to take responsibility, if they have to use a paper cup they should recycle, it has never been easier to recycle a paper cup, with over 1,500 collection points, over 80% of councils offer bring-banks, and over 20% offer kerbside collections, and that is on top of all the in-store recycling in most national chains being done. We need more positive headlines "UK probably the largest recycler of paper cups in the world" might help.

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

It seems like a waste of resources to focus on individual recycling schemes: eg coffee cups, coffee grounds, tetrapacks, now crisp packets. They all use resources to make the containers, need space, extra transport emissions and most importantly will capture only the fraction of the total product that is discarded. Why not focus our efforts to the packaging design so it is easily recycled and/or the technical solutions and boosting capabilities of clean and dirty MRFs that actually process majority of the material? Just thinking out loud...

Wind power breaks 100% threshold for Scotland's electricity demand

Here we are again!!! It would seem that the illusion that wind power, entirely dependent on the wind,(now there''s a surprise!!), has, by chance, generated the number of megawatthours sufficient to meet the demand of about 97% of the demand over a period of time, is still with us. It seems to be a many headed Hydra. MAY WE BE CLEAR, THIS IS NOT, REPEAT NOT, SUPPLYING POWER IN RESPONSE TO DEMAND. GENERATION IS VARIABLE WITH TIME, IRRESPECTIVE OF DEMAND. IT IS GRAB IT WHEN YOU CAN GENERATION. Generation on demand still has be available in order to satisfy demand whenever the wind drops. And indeed, being by statute forced to operate in this uneconomic fashion, has to be subsidised. The fact that wind generation between May 31 and June 5, this year, total metered wind power for all on and off-shore facilities, fell to less than 1GW (we have 20GW installed), was not highlighted by edienews. Richard Phillips

Wind power breaks 100% threshold for Scotland's electricity demand

For the period 14 Nov to 12 December 2018 the Offshore Wind Generation for UK has been 10.9%. Onshore wind generation has been 7.2%. Cant get the numbers quoted on this report to add up to 100%.

Wind power breaks 100% threshold for Scotland's electricity demand

This is welcome news, but no mention is made of matching supply and demand! What happens when the wind blows strongly at night, when there is low demand? Where is the excess electricity used or stored? Perhaps it is exported to England, and then Scotland buys electricity back when the wind does not blow in the Highlands... A partial story, I''m afraid. A good headline, but one that leaves a lot of crucial questions unanswered.

Climate change made UK heatwave 30 times more likely - Met Office

"and thousands of houses suffered subsidence." The same thing happened in 1976, but the spell of hot dry weather was uninterrupted between May and September. Not broken by rain as this year. The damaged houses had inadequate foundations. A friend of mine took notice and had a concrete raft for his new build, made to better specifications, in order to avoid this situation. Seems that all builders did not do the same. Computer models are fine; as long as ALL variables are modelled. The IPCC today have ceased to consider variations of solar activity. The output only reflects the input. Example; the Mann Hockey stick, three times found by official US statisticians to be based on a fraudulent programme, (it gave a hockey stick prediction even when random number data was used as input!!). I have yet to see an official explanation, at molecular level, on the mechanism whereby CO2 is able to punch so much above its weight. But there is huge amount of money at stake, and it is not just talking, it''s shouting at the top of its voice!!! Richard Phillips

Merlin Entertainments switches to 100% renewable electricity for UK attractions

Our principal renewable power source is wind, followed by solar in daylight. Both are variable and beyond any control. Biomass at about 4GW maximum, is dispatchable. It would be interesting, but I suspect impossible, to know whether all the electricity supplied as Renewable, and paid for as such, is actually being generated at the time of supply, or are we back to the old MWhour deceptions? What official control, or even monitoring, is there upon the supply and charging for this power? Richard Phillips

UK's first national crisp packet recycling scheme launched by Walkers

So, can you provide an address to send crisp packets to? Is there a specific Freepost address to use? It would be good to start spreading full news about the facility here and now in this article. I''ll pull a few packets out of my bin to send straight away! I looked at Terracycle''s web site previously and found no mention of this following your previous article.

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

Thanks for those details Torstein. There was talk of similar problems burning pelletised "leafy" material in furnaces, leaving deposits on the heat exchangers. All clouded in mystery!!! I still prefer nuclear fission, PWRs, with CCGT, about 80:20 And in the future we should have fast reactors, we have fuel in the cupboard, 115 tonnes of plutonium. Richard Phillips

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

@ Richard Phillips "Why not pelletise the grass on the spot, ready for direct combustion as a domestic or industrial fuel???" Torrefaction before pelletization or briquetting makes the fuel less sticky, something about the fibers, it gets brittle enough to be able to be crushed into "dust bombs" that ignite at maximum efficiency in combustion chambers. Like coal do now, and regular pellets do not. Torrefied pellets/briquettes are also water resistant, like coal, while regular pellets are not (making transport and storage cheaper). Regular pellets can only work as fuel in a co-firing situation, while torrefied briquettes are so alike coal that they can be used as the only fuel. Regular pellets leaves a residue in the combustion chambers that make them somewhat unconvenient to use, it requires more maintenance and is thus more expensive. Regrettably I can''t give a meaningful response to your other points that I''m sure are valid, because I simply don''t have enough knowledge in chemistry. I suggest you contact the company directly, hopefully someone with technical knowledge can answer your questions, and if they do, please post what you learned here. You can contact them here: https://nextfuel.com/contact-us

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

No, Torstein, I had not wondered at all! A major constituent of all such plant matter is cellulose (C6 H10 O5)n. Upon roasting, a great deal of the H10 O5 part will be driven off as water, leaving just the carbon, the only combustible part of the molecule. You are quite correct, this residue is just where the heat potential resides. In pure cellulose, over half the weight is "water", not as such, but evolved as water upon heating. Upon combustion of pure cellulose, all the heat comes from carbon, the H and O are evolved as water (and incidentally as steam, the heat of evaporation coming from the carbon, but wasted as it seldom industrially recovered ), this is common to all "carbohydrates", like sugar. The wood fired Drax power station does not operate heat recovery from the flu gas, but you must have a condensing gas central heating boiler!! Why not pelletise the grass on the spot, ready for direct combustion as a domestic or industrial fuel??? As industrial fuels, biomass or biofuel, I am extremely cynical; ethanol has only half the calorific value of petrol, its addition to vehicle fuel reduces he mpg. But politicians rarely have any scientific knowledge, or the desire to acquire it. Richard Phillips

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

Correction: The output is 5.51 MWH, not 5.05 MWH.

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

@ Richard Pillips Maybe you also wondered why the briquettes were at 23-28 gigajoule per ton while elephant grass itself has an energy content of approximately 18 gj/t.? To produce 1 ton of NextFuel, you need 1.56 ton of elephant grass. Basically the torrefaction process gets rid of all the unimportant stuff in the grass, and the end result is a very energy dense briquette. Only 2.5% of the energy content of the briquette originates from the use of electricity in the briquette production process, the rest originates from the grass itself!

Wales pledges to phase-out fossil fuels in favour of renewables

It seems as if the Welsh have gone completely mad, and I just hope they won''t come running to England for help when the sun does not shine and the wind does not blow and their nuclear power station is being serviced. The Germans decided to abandon nuclear power and bought their electricity from France - 80% nuclear generation - and then used lignite - much worse than coal for CO2. FoE Wales quotes David Attenborough in Katowice: The Times carried the story at the bottom of page 17 - and got the importance about right. We will all wake up soon and realise that the impending catastrophe has been oversold...

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

@ Richard Phillips "Dry elephant grass contains, per unit mass, a certain amount of heat energy, released upon complete combustion with oxygen. [...] No amount of completing the process by a variety of paths can give more energy." Now I understand your concern, of course you are correct. But the "carbon negativity" claim is not based on pseudo-scientific claims like this, that somehow you get more energy output than energy input. On the contrary, there is of course less energy coming out of the process than going in, 7.07 MWH is going in, while 5.05 MWH is coming out. The "carbon negativity" claim rests upon basically three factors, 1.) carbon is deposited in the roots and soil below the plants, 2.) the briquette processing itself is very efficient, and 3.) if the fuel is grown and used in relatively close proximity to each other, the transport is also very energy efficient. Basically, factor 1, the depositing of carbon in the soil ("natural" CCS) outweighs the energy use of factor 2 (fuel production) and factor 3 (transport). If you grow your fuel locally, and have access to this new efficient processing technology, you get a CO2 negative fuel.

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

Dry elephant grass contains, per unit mass, a certain amount of heat energy, released upon complete combustion with oxygen. No more, no less. It is a founding principle of thermochemistry. There is no free lunch. No amount of completing the process by a variety of paths can give more energy. In fact the greater the complexity of the process, the less efficient the heat recovery becomes. There is nothing new in the concept of roasting complex organics; the Gas Light and Coke Company were doing this on a huge scale at the Beckton Gas Works a century ago using coal. They produced coke, town gas, and a variety of organic materials. The science is quite absent from this report. Richard Phillips

Wales pledges to phase-out fossil fuels in favour of renewables

The problem with this knee jerk "good intention" is it ignores the fact that the majority of the hydrocarbons produced are NOT used for fuels but for petrochemicals including fertilisers, pharmaceuticals, plastics, synthetic fabrics and a thousands other essential everyday products. I happen to agree that we can not continue to waste this essential resource by burning it, be that in a power station or a vehicle, but that does not mean we will stop extracting it safely and utilising it

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

I have invested in this company and the following is just what I have managed to dig up doing my due diligence. So, I''m not an expert, I''m just giving you my opinion based on what I have managed to understand until now. @ John Mathias "What about the emissions resulting in transporting the fuel to Africa and South America? Would it not be better to grow and produce the fuel in these countries rather than transporting it 1,000''s of miles?" You are correct, and that is indeed the plan. The Austria factory is mainly to test that the technology works in scale. So before ships can use NextFuel as fuel, or use electricity, it is indeed better to grow and produce the fuel locally, as of now this is one of the main reasons the fuel is carbon negative. @ Peter Haslop "Where exactly are we proposing to grow this elephant grass?" Everywhere really, but some climates are better, especially parts of Africa, South America and Asia. Generally where there is lots of sun and enough rain. @ Colin Matthews "Rather suspect you get more energy out by AD of elephant grass than by this fuel... Can elephant grass be grown in Africa climatically?" Have not heard about this AD process (I guess you mean anaerobic digestion). What I can tell you is that the energy content of NextFuel is 23-28 gigajoule per tonne, above brown coal and just below black coal/anthracite. Elephant grass grows like crazy in Africa :-) I talked to a girl I know that visits Kenya often and she says everybody knows about it down there. @ Richard Phillips Didn''t quite understand all your comments, but understood this: "Besides the fuel emissions from transportation, there is the question of the heating process, (perhaps this is nuclear heat!?!?) There is even the CO2 breathed out by the workers in the process, solely due to their exertions in the process." The heat comes from the surplus gases driven out of the grass in the torrefaction process. Only a small amount of electricity is needed in addition to this "free" heat. In the process of producing 1 ton of NextFuel, the surplus gases produce 0.85 MWH in the form of heat, while the electricity needed in addition to this, amounts to only 0.13 MWH. Total energy input is 7.07 MWH (chemical energy in the grass plus that small amount of electricity), total energy output is 5.05 MWH (chemical energy in the briquettes only, not counting the 0.85 MWH of usable heat). The CO2 breathed by the workers is only a very very small amount. Regarding fuel emissions from transportation, that is more of an issue. The longer you transport something, the more CO2 you release, so transport better get green fast.. I think it is safe to say that you can''t transport this fuel around the world and still expect the whole process to be carbon negative. It is when you both produce and use the fuel in a reasonably close distance from each other the process is CO2 negative. How close are we talking? I don''t know, but I think it is logical to expect research papers about this. This is really the million dollar question, what we all want to know. @ Ian Byrne: "Do they never rot down, releasing CO2 (or worse, methane) back to the atmosphere?" The carbon in the roots also moves to the soil around the roots. Some of it will eventually mineralize. If you do plow, "some" CO2 and methane will release back into the atmosphere, this is the same problem everywhere, both for forests and agriculture in general. If you don''t plow however, it will take a long time to leak, many decades, and nobody really knows how much is leaked and how much stays. We basically need to stay on top of this by continually planting. "Can you plant more miscanthus rhizomes in the same field that you have used before infinitely often?" Not infinitely often of course, but many times should be doable. Also, there is research on seed-based planting now. "there will be associated emissions from fertiliser, transportation and processing." You are correct. See above for the energy balance of the processing. I don''t have any numbers regarding fertiliser use and transportation. I know however that fertiliser is not very effective on miscanthus, that it grows also on marginal land without fertilizer, and that transportation at least is "in the process" of going green. For instance, I do think it is possible to power ships with NextFuel.

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

The carbon-negative aspect appears to be Elephant grass needs a lot of CO2 to grow, and also stores some of this in its roots below ground. In that way, it captures so much carbon from the atmosphere that it can make our entire process carbon-negative in a matter of months. So what happens to the carbon sequestered in the roots? Do they never rot down, releasing CO2 (or worse, methane) back to the atmosphere? Can you plant more miscanthus rhizomes in the same field that you have used before infinitely often? I suspect not... Colin Matthews and Richard Phillips correct, also, in that there will be associated emissions from fertiliser, transportation and processing. This article looks like greenwash to me.

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

All germane comments, brushed aside by business talk. Besides the fuel emissions from transportation, there is the question of the heating process, (perhaps this is nuclear heat!?!?) There is even the CO2 breathed out by the workers in the process, solely due to their exertions in the process. So much of this nonsense disregards entirely any science or the consideration of the process in its entirety. And what is the molecular mechanism whereby CO2 exerts this "forcing effect" on water vapour, some sixty times the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere? Richard Phillips

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

The first Carbon negative fuel? What about Biomethane from the A.D. of manure? Would be interesting to see the energy balance between AD of elephant grass versus the calorific value of this fuel. Rather suspect you get more energy out by AD of elephant grass than by this fuel... Can elephant grass be grown in Africa climatically?

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

Where exactly are we proposing to grow this elephant grass?

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

What about the emissions resulting in transporting the fuel to Africa and South America? Would it not be better to grow and produce the fuel in these countries rather than transporting it 1,000''s of miles?

10 years on from the Climate Change Act, how far have we come? - The Low Carbon blog

Hi This is a nice summary. But government leadership is really lacking at the moment with little actual policy implementation and not much it appears will change in the rest of the current parliament. In particular, low carbon heating requires a whole raft of new policy support since decarbonisation of heat through the RHI will only be about half the target expected to be delivered by 2020 (6 instead of 12%). Also it won''t be possible to fit lots of heat pumps in draughty and poorly insulated buildings. If we don''t keep a clear and strong focus on retrofitting low carbon heating we aren''t going to make much progress. New policies are promised for spring next year following the Framework for Heat consultation last spring but these will it seems not be implemented until after the RHI ends or the new building regs come into force. Remember that 1.1 million homes off the gas grid (mostly heated by oil or conventional electric) will need to be retrofitted with low carbon heating systems by 2030 (Committee on Climate Change) which is something like 80,000 per year if we started now! Steffi Harangozo

World's first carbon-negative fuel set to be unveiled at COP24 Summit

Is growing and transporting quantity of elephant grass needed feasible?

'We are last generation that can stop climate change' - UN summit

There seems, upon viewing the technical qualifications of a number of the speakers, that basic knowledge of climate science is somewhat lacking among the advocates of the disaster scenario. Let us quote from a little science, a study of the influence of the variation of solar radiation upon the Earth. It is, after all, our only natural source of heat and light, we just do not compete, From "Whatsupwiththat": DR WILLIE SOON By Dr. Jeffrey Foss December 2, 2018 Willie just happened to choose solar science as a career and, like many solar scientists, after nearly three decades of scientific research in his case, came to believe that changes in the sun''s brightness, sunspots and energy output, changes in the orbital position of the Earth relative to the sun, and other powerful natural forces drive climate change. In brief, our sun controls our climate. Even the IPCC initially indicated agreement with him, citing his work approvingly in its second (1996) and third (2001) Assessment Reports. That later changed, significantly. Sure, everyone agrees that the sun caused the waxing and waning of the ice ages, just as solar scientists say. However, the sun had to be played down if carbon dioxide (CO2) was to be played up - an abuse of science that makes Willie sick. Unfortunately for the IPCC, solar scientists think solar changes also explain Earth''s most recent warming period which, they point out, began way back in the 1830s - long before we burned enough fossil fuels to make any difference. They also observed the shrinking of the Martian ice-caps in the 1990s, and their return in the last few years - in perfect time with the waning and waxing of Arctic ice caps here on Earth. Only the sun - not the CO2 from our fires - could cause that Earth-Mars synchronicity. And surely it is no mere coincidence that a grand maximum in solar brightness (Total Solar Irradiance or TSI) took place in the 1990s as both planets' ice caps shrank, or that the sun cooled (TSI decreased) as both planets'' ice caps grew once again. All that brings us back to Dr. Soon''s disagreements with the IPCC. The IPCC now insists that solar variability is so tiny that they can just ignore it, and proclaim CO2 emissions as the driving force behind climate change. But solar researchers long ago discovered unexpected variability in the sun''s brightness - variability that is confirmed in other stars of the sun's type. Why does the IPCC ignore these facts? ... It sure looks like the IPCC is hiding the best findings of solar science so that it can trumpet the decreases in planetary warming (the so-called "greenhouse effect") that they embed in the "scenarios" (as they call them) emanating from their computer models. Ignoring the increase in solar brightness over the 80s and 90s, they instead enthusiastically blame the warmth of the 1990s on human production of CO2. ... Surely Willie and solar scientists are right about the primacy of the sun. Why? Because the observable real world is the final test of science. And the data - actual evidence - shows that global temperatures follow changes in solar brightness on all time-scales, from decades to millions of years. On the other hand, CO2 and temperature have generally gone their own separate ways on these time scales. Global temperatures stopped going up in the first two decades of this century, even though CO2 has steadily risen. The IPCC blames this global warming "hiatus" on "natural climate variability," meaning something random, something not included in their models, something the IPCC didn''t see coming. ... Unlike the IPCC, Willie and I cannot simply ignore the fact that there were multiple ice ages millions of years ago, when CO2 levels were four times higher than now. And even when CO2 and temperature do trend in tandem, as in the famous gigantic graph in Al Gore's movie, the CO2 rises followed temperature increases by a few centuries. That means rising CO2 could not possibly have caused the temperature increases - an inconvenient truth that Gore doesn''t care about and studiously ignores. DR WILLIE SOON Time for a little science, and less alarmism. Richard Phillips

Report: UK among nations leading the world's low-carbon transition

"Average yearly carbon footprint of 5kg per person"? Really? https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EN.ATM.CO2E.PC?view=map

Wind generates record amount of electricity

Well said Kieron The total installed wind power has a headline value of 20GW. If we could have that 14.5GW as a reliable power source it would be valuable. However, if wishes were horses, then beggars would ride!!!! As it is, it a highly unreliable, variable power source over which we have no control. In fact it is worse than that. Wind has priority in the grid over gas and coal. When plentiful, in high winds, gas and coal are required, and are able, to reduce output to match requirements. And in times of high demand and low winds, gas and coal step in to make good the inevitable deficiency. This obligation to pander to wind power is costly, and requires financial support, customer pays. The cost of onshore wind power is only less than conventional sources if subsidies are ignored, and note that off-shore is excluded from the "cheaper than" slogan. The life of turbines is considerably shorter than fossil and nuclear plant, requiring "repowering and blade change in 12-15 years, nuclear plant is designed for 60 years, and experience with our own, now old rectors has been to exhibit their trustworthiness. I would have more confidence in the technical statements in these matters by Emma Pinchbeck if she were to have technical qualifications in power generation or science; Classics and English from oxford, excellent in their field, do quite fill the slot. I did have an FRIC in 1971, and did spend 35 years in nuclear energy research at the AERE at Harwell. And I keep up to date . Richard Phillips

How does the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures impact the SDGs? - The Jade Advisor

Hi Carolina, Thank you! I appreciate the connection with finance/risk with SDG''s, but was unaware of the TCFD until now. Kind regards. Tony Anthony Sellin Energy Manager & Carbon Accountant University of Canterbury

Is the fashion industry about to have its 'plastics moment'?

Years ago, I coined the phrase "Slow Clothes". The idea of Slow Clothes is about slowing down the ferociously fast fashion cycle by: Designing and producing clothes to minimise their environmental impact Developing and using responsibly-produced and environmentally-friendly textile fibres Focusing on employing durable fabrics and weaves Using stitching and seams that ensure clothes are well-constructed and don't fall apart Creating clothes that are: o easy to wash, clean and dry and don't cause excessive pollution in the process o warm but attractive for winter wear o lightweight but not flimsy and throwaway items for summer wear Designing clothes so that colours and styles don't go "out of fashion" but remain attractive classics that go on being available. Perhaps we should go back to having tailors who make clothes to exactly suit each individual and, for the thrifty, bring sewing patterns and sewing machines back into the home as a valued and respectable activity. Incorporating upcyclability (re-use as something else when part of the item wears out) and recyclability (use as second grade textile products) into all clothing design Making buying clothes an investment once more, so we value them and look after them Instead of flooding the market with poor-quality clothing in its pursuit of "growth" and profits, the fashion sector should be concentrating on creating durable but pleasant clothing and encouraging everyone to wear their clothes not just a few times when they are new, but until they are worn out. And when they are worn out, these clothes should have a second life by going to the textile bins that most communities now have, from where they can then be upcycled or recycled. Could the industry introduce an incentive scheme to help the public engage in this process? One of the most critical issues for the fashion industry to recognise is about winter wear. Everyone needs useful clothes in winter that keep us warm, and which are still attractive, so that we don't need to keep our buildings and homes so hot in the winter. As part of my work, I visit a lot of schools and they are all so hot in the winter - hotter than they are in the summer! As well as the seriously-raised carbon emissions from all those school boilers, the children's ability to concentrate and learn must be significantly compromised. Because of the heat, school staff go round in lightweight clothing. This situation is often the same in many large offices because of overheating. This trend for keeping workplaces hot over the winter then drives the public's clothing purchases towards summer-weight items all year round and consequently reduces the demand for winter-weight clothing. In terms of the environment, this is not a good trend. Clearly therefore, to get ourselves from "Fast Fashion" to "Slow Clothes", the wider issues must be looked at if we are to really address the fashion industry's environmental impact in its totality.

Wind generates record amount of electricity

And a week later with a massive High over the country it produces virtually nothing. Or a named storm rolls in and they are all feathered to prevent damage. All well and good celebrating a day but until wind is providing 100% of the country''s demand 100% of the time come tempest or calm it''s nothing much to really shout about.

Tesco's EV charging network and Sweden's ice hotel: The sustainability success stories of the week

Michael - news to me on the solar front as all the Tesco superstores I know don''t appear to have anything but air con units on the roof. Perhaps Tesco need to advertise the fact they have roof top solar to enhance their reputation. Agree with you on the fridges. Never have understood the open front chillers. Spend all that energy keeping food cold AND spend more energy to keep the store warm. If Lidl and Co-Op can have fridges with doors then why can''t the larger retailers. How difficult is it for a consumer to slide a door open to get a litre of milk or a pack of chicken breasts?

Tesco's EV charging network and Sweden's ice hotel: The sustainability success stories of the week

Urban wind generally doesn''t work due to the shielding effect of structures - most sites except some in rural areas such the fens of Lincolnshire couldn''t generate enough and would be most unlikely to be sustainable or financially effective. Tesco has a lot of micro and few larger wind generators that spend most of their time looking the part, but not acting it. They just need to buy renewable energy from sources that can do it cost-effectively and balance out the peaks and troughs. Solar is a good idea though and they have been installing that on their roofs for a decade or more (and batteries, I hear). The best thing they could do for fridges (apart from using ammonia or CO2) is put doors on. But retail spend is their goal and until the public start asking why they don''t have doors on all fridges and freezers, and voting with their wallets, they will not do it everywhere.

Tesco's EV charging network and Sweden's ice hotel: The sustainability success stories of the week

Now if Tesco were to install solar panels and vertical axis wind generators on all the roofs of all their superstores to power the chargers (and the fridges) then this really would be a breakthrough. Eventually every space in a supermarket car park should have a charge point rather than the 1 or 2 there are at present.

BT 'within touching distance' of 100% renewables target

I sometimes wonder if it would be possible to link the renewable energy sold, to the the amount being generated at the time the sales were made. Naughty, perhaps?? Richard Phillips

Martson's to rollout 400 rapid EV chargers across UK estate

If EVs are going to become ubiquitous as personal transportation then this kind of action needs to become more normal. When there are chargers everywhere battery range ceases to be a concern. But does anyone else see the danger of driving to a pub to charge your car? Or is it just me?

CCS key to meeting climate change targets say ETI

CCS is not technically difficult, the chemical engineering lies within stabdard technologies. The problem lies in the inevitably high costs. Adsorbers will be needed in quantity, and losses and degredation will occur of possibly costly materials. Energy costs in the plant, and for transport, pumping, will be very high. The decision is simply, is it worth it? For electricity generation, I would say not, go to nuclear, but this scares the pants off the politicians when it actually comes to it, With 80 percent nuclear, the small balance of CCGT would not be worth bothering about. Leave the science and engineering to scientists and engineers, not to politicians. Richard Phillips

Survey: 89% of UK fleet managers 'will switch to EVs before 2030'

My comment closed before I had finished. It would seem to me that a great many fleet managers have not appreciater that neither smart meters or a smart grid do anything to make more power available unless it it being generated. The smart grid has only to be introduced because the chaotic nature of wind power makes manual grid control unworkable. With generation on demand these problems did not exist. I will beliecesome of the transformation when I see evidence of more copper going into the ground, substations to deal with an increased load, and the building of more dispatchable power plant, equal to the increase in wind generation. Perhaps I am being a tad cynical!,, Richard Phillips

Survey: 89% of UK fleet managers 'will switch to EVs before 2030'

It is barely believable that such a majority should contemplate such a move. Besides the obvious problems of low distance ranges and the assurance of plentiful charging points at high power, there is the fundamental problem of the generation capacity. Nuclear will be declining, without the prospect of even the present fleer being replaced, let alone augmented. Relience upon large increases in wind power is unreal without fossil backup, the only solution to long period almost zero power. The first week of June this year saw a wnd outage of some five days, no contemplatableable storage can deal this,certainly not batteries, or hydro. This is withoutbthe additional gegeration needed for these vehicles

Drax seeks 'negative emissions' with biomass and CCS trial

Is this going to be taking into account all the CO2 emitted transporting all the wood chips across the Atlantic by cargo ship that Drax needs to burn?

Arsenal FC to power Emirates Stadium through battery storage system

What about leading the way and installing solar panels on the roof of the stadium? There''s a lot of square meters up there that could actually generate enough power for the entire stadium and probably help power the homes around the ground. How''s that for giving back to the community?

Merlin Entertainments begins single-use plastic phase out, starting with straws

A governmental consultation on the removal of plastics straws - good job they have not got any other things on their plate. Isn''t this just a huge distraction from the much greater problem of excess use of plastics in packaging throughout especially on premium brands who seem to feel that they are above such matters.

Business transparency needed to help consumers overcome the 'plastics fear'

"The European Standards authority CEN makes a clear distinction (in TR 15351) between oxo-degradation, which is "degradation identified as resulting from oxidative cleavage of macromolecules," and oxo-biodegradation which is "degradation identified as resulting from oxidative and cell-mediated phenomena, either simultaneously or successively." The microplastics being recovered from the oceans are from "oxo-degradable" plastics, which degrade and fragment but do not biodegrade except over a very long period of time. These are ordinary plastics, which undoubtedly create persistent microplastics, and this is why they have been banned for a wide range of products in Saudi Arabia and 11 other countries, where oxo-biodegradable technology for making these products is now mandatory. Peter Susman QC, a deputy High Court Judge in England has examined the evidence and found that "oxo-biodegradable plastic does facilitate the ultimate biodegradation of plastics in air or seawater by bacteria, fungi or algae, within a reasonable time, so as to cause the plastic to cease to exist as such, far sooner than ordinary plastics, without causing any toxicity." This report is published in full on the Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association's website."

Business transparency needed to help consumers overcome the 'plastics fear'

Why don t they go back to mostly glass, returnable bottles?

Government 'distorted figures', says Tidal Lagoon Power

So, it''ll cost more just not quite as much more.

Taking place TOMORROW: edie's sustainable manufacturing webinar

Hi Joel, Thanks for your interest. The webinar will be available on-demand shortly after the live recording, via the link provided in this article - you will still need to register for the webinar to view the on-demand version. Thanks, George

Taking place TOMORROW: edie's sustainable manufacturing webinar

Unfortunately I will not be able to attend the webinar. will a recording be made available?

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

Very good points made below, particularly on the Smart Meters (Heaven help us!). Energy efficiency in the built environment concerns the physical reality of keeping warm at the least cost of energy expenditure. A physical reality. Heat is to be provided in the most advantageous fashion, and then inhibited from escaping. Inhibited; it will all eventually be dissipated. The physics is concerned with slowing down the escape rate. This is thus concerned with matters of a physical nature, involving science and engineering. Review of the membership of the BEIS Committee reveals that none have any graduate qualifications, or, apparently lower studies, in science or engineering. Nor do we have a Minister for Energy or a Secretary of State who has ever been better qualified. The document gives no hint of the difficulty and complexity of carrying out work on the older housing stock of the country, indeed in most cases it might be economic to pull most of it down and start again. The inappropriateness of Ministerial knowledge to the post held is most glaring in these technical areas. The ministerial post should be professionally qualified, and have a spokesperson in the Commons. Richard Phillips

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

@Iain - agree, there have been reports of unsuitable cavity wall insulation being used on the West Coast that causes damp problems due to our very wet climate. We have seen so many of these government scheme abused due to p*55 poor oversight (NI''s RHI for instance). Whatever system is used it must be properly thought out and not another knee jerk, vote winning reaction.

UK energy revolution risks creating a 'two-tier' economy

Please note that 11% of all males are colour blind in the red/green spectrum. Alternative colours would help comprehension...

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

We have also seen many houses given inappropriate insulation by contractors who don''t understand how old walls of our Victorian housing stock work. Putting a non-vapour permeable insulation on old brick walls is likely to cause significant damage which may not become apparent for years. There needs to be a formal system in place to ensure that opportunistic installers seeking to maximise profit from yet another Government sponsored initiative don''t end up ruining the country''s housing stock.

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

It''s high time for such an inquiry and more activity to catalyze a wave of energy efficiency improvement in our older building stock. I will be highlighting two possible areas of improvement on the committee''s website: 1. The MEES legislation is pushing the private sector in the right direction, but equivalent encouragement in the social housing sector is a current gap. 2. Nurturing innovation from manufacturers in energy efficiency solutions would also help. As a manufacturer (Dulux) working to launch a coating with insulating properties, I know how hard it is to encourage adoption of new solutions. At least the subject is under scrutiny and being discussed! Thanks for the article. Duncan Lochhead, Commercial Sustainability Manager at AkzoNobel

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

It''s high time for such an inquiry and more activity to catalyze a wave of energy efficiency improvement in our older building stock. I will be highlighting two possible areas of improvement on the committee''s website: 1. The MEES legislation is pushing the private sector in the right direction, but equivalent encouragement in the social housing sector is a current gap. 2. Nurturing innovation from manufacturers in energy efficiency solutions would also help. As a manufacturer (Dulux) working to launch a coating with insulating properties, I know how hard it is to encourage adoption of new solutions. At least the subject is under scrutiny and being discussed! Thanks for the article. Duncan Lochhead, Commercial Sustainability Manager at AkzoNobel

'Far too slow': MPs investigate UK's energy efficiency progress

Wasting 11 BILLION on pointless "smart" meters doesn''t help. This money could have been much better spent ensuring every home in Britain had proper insulation (floors, walls and roofs), modern efficient central heating systems, even giving every home with a hot water tank a free tank jacket and giving every home 6 LED light bulbs. Proper energy efficiency would save UK Households far more money and make every home warm and dry, no one in the 21st century should be living in a damp home or having to pay over the odds to heat their home properly

UK energy revolution creating a 'two-tier' economy

Does this report factor in the massive amounts of generation capacity in the Highlands but the ridiculous extra cost we who live there are burdened with for "distribution"? We have huge hydro and wind generation sites on our doorstep yet we pay a premium for our electricity due to a) distribution costs and b) the lack of dual fuel discounts as most of us are not on the gas network. Maybe the long awaited Scottish Government''s publicly owned, not for profit energy company will resolve this discrepancy but I won''t hold my breath

Spain targets 100% renewable power by 2050

Spain has already harnessed a considerable proportion of its economic hydro resources, at about 19GW. To rely on wind and solar for the rest of her electricity demand is unreal. I do wonder how many experienced electrical engineers have been involved in drawing up this 100% plan. Dream on. Richard Phillips

From BMW to Harley-Davidson: The EV market accelerates again

Diesel Motorbikes? Diesel Harley-Davidson?? Whoever wrote that clearly doesn''t have the first clue about motorcycles. I don''t have clue about them, but I know that there are no production diesel motorbikes, and certainly never been any diesel Harleys...

Report: G20 nations off track to meet Paris Agreement goals, despite clean energy promises

Just two questions, anybody? By what molecular mechanism does CO2 punch so far above it abundance (one sixtieth of that of water vapour, the principal greenhouse gas)? How does one explain that when the statistics are done, the rise of global temperature correlates with a rise in CO2 to show half the temperature rise used by the IPCC. (This is the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity). The value found in reality is about 1.5 degrees C, the IPCC "favour" a value of over 3 degrees C? This is not hysteria, it is science, any answers? Richard Philips

'Fundamental' agriculture reforms needed for UK to reach carbon neutrality, says CCC

"While the burning of wood, plants and organic waste has historically been hailed as a "clean" alternative to fossil fuels, the report warns that biomass can actually have a more detrimental environmental impact than coal, diesel or gas, when lifecycle emissions are accounted for" I commented a few days ago, why are we burning 7 million tonnes of wood every year at Drax??? Whole mature trees are being felled, en masse, the infrastructure needed to handle the huge quantities of wood chip is prodigious. When burned, only the carbon generates heat, and about 6% is wasted in boiling away the combined water content of the wood. Yes, a rotten deal. And the degradation of peatland. Once peat is disturbed, it degrades progressively, it cannot be stopped. Wind turbine bases, large constructions many on remote peatland degrade it very efficiently. Large areas have been destroyed in Wales. Hillsides are very vulnerable to landslide. Sense from the CCC at last Richard Phillips

Five ways food and drink firms are manufacturing a sustainable future

I would love to be able to read all these reports because they tie in neatly with our sustainability goals across the NHS but I''m not able to read them unless I either pay 50 or sign up for more emails. I feel that this isn''t a fair sharing of information. It seems a shame when there are so many managers like me trying hard to help make a difference too. How can we do this without insight into others successes?

More than 800,000 people sign petition to release Iceland's banned Christmas advert

About half of the palm oil produced is used to produce bio-diesel, to make our cars "greener"! Sustainability is a very difficult subject, one has got to chase the subject back so far that the process gets lost. I can see no point in biofuels, the chemical processing itself consumes energy. The feed back time through photosynthesis is a long one. Wood burning in power stations is another one. For Drax we import 7 million tons of wood from the USA. Half this weight is chemically combined water. Upon combustion it is released producing no heat, it is boiled off and blown up the chimney, taking about 6% of the heat from the furnace with it. Domestic boilers have to recover this heat, by law. But only scientists and engineers can understand this crazy game. In the end it is all for money, not saving the planet. Richard Phillips

Wind power delivered 98% of Scotland's electricity demand in October

I do agree Richard! Without power from English nuclear, coal, gas and diesel engines, supported on low wind days by power from Europe, electricity supply in Scotland would have been all over the place. The only thing missing in this tendentious report is the Halleluja Chorus!

Wind power delivered 98% of Scotland's electricity demand in October

Wind power delivered 98% of Scotland's electricity demand in October

I really do marvel at the capacity of wind power enthusiasts to observe on an uninterrupted basis, power generation by mega-watt hours, and not megawatts. The latter tells us whether or not the power was being generated at a particular moment. Coal, gas, and nuclear, generate on demand; turbines generate when the wind blows, "grab it when you can get it." Its technology, not journalism, that reflects reality. Richard Phillips

University of Leeds unveils plan to become 'plastic-free' by 2023

I m tasked with removing all single use plastics - I would love to know more.

UK renewable energy capacity surpasses fossil fuels for first time

In many online news items about renewables and in particular Solar PV on the domestic roofs, there are two parts to the generation. The amount generated in the property is metered and presumably fed into the suppliers'' reports. However, there is a delay of at least one month before the value is known. In the case of export volumes, how is the output calculated and who aggregates the data from over a million homes.

Why Iceland's deforestation-focused Christmas advert won't be on TV this year

This looks a lot like suppression of free speech. Is deforestation really a political issue? I thought Greenpeace was a registered charity, not a political party or lobbying group? I''m sure I''ve seen Prince Charles using sustainability to sell his biscuits, or Sainsburies talking about their sustainable fishing policy, or any of the middle class shops, whats the difference here?

M&S unveils reusable bags made with 75% 'ocean-bound' plastic

@ Rebecca Fleet - We''ve been informed that they are recyclable but not biodegradable/compostable. However, they are designed to be a "bag for life".

Why Iceland's deforestation-focused Christmas advert won't be on TV this year

I don''t see a political overtone - but I see a message industry would lobby against. Watch the video, don''t buy palm oil. A wrong call by the ASA to my mind

UK renewable energy capacity surpasses fossil fuels for first time

Come on edie! Surely a comparison of fossil fuels with renewables and low carbon should at least mention capacity factors and relative energy generation as well as installed capacity? David Peacock

M&S unveils reusable bags made with 75% 'ocean-bound' plastic

Sounds like a good initiative. Are these bags recyclable? Or do they decompose?

University of Leeds unveils plan to become 'plastic-free' by 2023

Whilst we need to move away from fossil fuel based energy in the future..we have to think carefully about how moving from plastic as a resource effects our CO2 as well as habitats/land use..where is all the plant material for bio plastics coming from? This cannot be from crops that take up more habitat/land and also we have decades of plastic to deal with,..do we reuse it as we capture it, burn it, bury it, turn it back to oil ( burn it)...people keep telling me about their bamboo toothbrushes,,it can''t all be composted anyway...I''ve got a plastic handle I''ve had it for 4 years and replace the heads..which is better?! I would have had used quite a few bamboo brushes over 4 years..? Out of interest where does all the plant material for the coop bags come from hopefully it''s an unused "waste" resource..the trouble is not everyone who gets a bag from the coop then will dispose of it in the area that they got it from so there is some potential for contamination of plastic waste stream..probably small? These bags obv. will not compost in marine environments..maybe some kind of boomerang bag- returnable bag scheme might be better in small communities and just get rid of the single use altogether and do I need a bag to put my food waste in if i have a plastic caddy? but that all said it''s a marginally better step maybe..what I would like from supermarkets is a clear statement about which plastic they use actually saves food waste, which is cosmetic, which gives better CO2 savings..this would stop the call for supermarkets getting rid of it all..provide some clear and proper information... Any single use product that replaces a plastic single use product has to be questioned in terms of it''s own impact..it''s not all about plastic when we are looking at sustainable resource use and CO2 etc etc

University of Leeds unveils plan to become 'plastic-free' by 2023

It''s a very laudable approach in many ways. However, Leeds City Council has very limited food waste collections, so where are the students going to put the biodegradable bags? At the Co-op, we sell compostable carrier bags, but only in places where the local authority accepts them for food waste collection. (We don''t say biodegradable, it doesn''t convey anything about the proper conditions for disposal.)

Report: SDG alignment generated $233bn in business revenue last year

That is a very misleading headline, it gives the impression that an extra $233Bn was generated using SDG alignment when the facts in the body of the article show that 87% of the companies existing revenues of $266Bn were already SDG aligned

UK renewable energy capacity surpasses fossil fuels for first time

See;- https://library.prospect.org.uk/download/2018/01836 Says it all Richard Phillips

Former National Grid boss Steve Holliday: Britain is undergoing a chaotic energy revolution

Here in Pakistan, as you must be well aware, that there has been energy crises and shortfall in both electricity generation, and consumption. Recently, the we came across a working wikipedia paper in respect of carbon capture, storage and conversion into fuel, which could be very beneficial to production of energy, which will be absolutely carbon free, and very very helpful as climate change. Pakistan, is hacked by its industries, in coal power generation units, local industries which emits huge quantities of C02, causing pollution, and thus its majority population both in cities and rural area are exposed to health hazards. We had contacted the company Messrs. Carbon Engineering company which has opted to manufacture production units for capture of Co2 and conversion into Fuel, and has established such unit at Squamish city in British Columbia, Canada, and are awaiting their response. We happened to see your credential, as an authority in renewable energy, and wonder if you would be interested to help Pakistan in its revolution to over its energy crises, and further advise, whether these plants to capture Co2 and its conversion into fuel, can be of assistance for us. We can discuss our further plans, incase of your interests, and in the meanwhile, assuring you of our best attention, at all time. Regards. Egr. J.A.Durrani Consultant. Karachi-Pakistan

UK renewable energy capacity surpasses fossil fuels for first time

Should we really be counting Biomass in the Renewables column? Is burning trees really renewable, sustainable and low carbon? After all coal is purely compressed tree and an order of magnitude more energy dense. While small scale biomass using the waste from timber production (sawdust, chippings and unusable offcuts) to generate either electricity or heat locally is a good use of wood I personally don''t think chopping down trees to make wood pellets, transporting them half way across the world, to burn in a power station, to make electricity is sustainable or green. Just look at how much oil is used to produce and transport all those wood chips, is that really low carbon? Otherwise it''s quite an achievement really. With additional Hydro schemes being built in Scotland, development of Tidal Stream around the shores of our island and other measures it won''t be long before 75%+ is low carbon and many of the CCGT stations are being used purely for standby or emergency generation rather than baseload.

University of Leeds unveils plan to become 'plastic-free' by 2023

That''s setting a great example and I take it that Costas Vellis is a prime mover

EDF announces low-carbon vehicle partnership with Nissan

This is a very encouraging approach, it has a high prospect for efficient energy usage and support for sustainable future.

Latte levy: Was the Chancellor right to reject a tax on disposable cups?

Only my opinion, and of course I have no empirical evidence to back it up (neither it seems did Starbucks consider this possibility), but I would not be surprised if the 156% increase in re-usable cups resulting from Starbucks'' 5p charge on paper cups had more to do with people''s consciousness levels being raised and them thinking more about the harm their coffee cups do to the environment than the extra 5p they would spend. And no mention is made of the number of people who made the choice instead to sit in and drink their coffee in a comfy chair - as it should be drunk - rather than sporting the cup as a lifestyle accessory, parading down the street with the cup in one hand and mobile phone held to the ear with the other. Coffee should be enjoyed in a china cup (near infinitely re-usable).

UK's energy storage revolution happening faster than expected, study finds

This is a good thing as it will help smooth out the variability in wind and solar supply but the question still remains "how long can this provide power for?" In the scenario of a massive High pressure system stuck over the whole UK for a week, mid winter, where wind speeds are low or non existent and there is thick fog so we have a minimal amount of wind and solar generation occurring just how long can our storage provide power for? Are we talking hours or days. Then comes the question of what happens when all these batteries reach the end of their working lives, which WILL happen and probably quicker than projected, and they have to be replaced? Where will all the waste be handled or how? The road to hell is paved with good intentions and more than once we have seen a "green" idea become a paving slab on Route 666. With proper forward thinking I hope that battery based energy storage doesn''t become another problem in the future.

Climate Change Act: Experts reflect on pioneering legislation 10 years on

If the physical sciences evidence were demonstrably behind the impending disaster if we do not lead the world to zero carbon dioxide emission,(note CO2, not carbon, sheer linguistic indolence), I would be better persuaded. That climate changes, no argument, climates have always changed. That CO2 has an effect, no argument, but the magnitude is not known, nor is the mechanism by which it has an influence beyond its concentration, 0.04% in the atmosphere; water vapour, the big GHG, about 2.5%. Explanation needed, and its proof. The big driver of all this is in the money (public money) to be made by spreading alarm, then calming the waters with assurances that, well, we can save the situation, but it will cost you. Holders of degrees totally unrelated to the physical sciences or engineering relevant to the subject, hold forth at length, but only muddy the waters. Richard Phillips

Latte levy: Was the Chancellor right to reject a tax on disposable cups?

Here''s the thing. Just back from London and a well known coffee shop. Virtually all buying, even to drink in store, took disposable cups, most were younger consumers. Wife and I had reusable crockery by choice. Yes we are old!!!! No concern from majority about price only about getting their coffee. Best response - crockery only and no take aways. By the way wife and I have a usable cup for when we need it so can cover this off as well. Time people got real about the real problem. Not price or a surcharge but a lack of care about recycling and the environment!!

9 ways AI is enhancing sustainability for business

From Green GB Week to baffling Budgets: There's still much to be done on sustainability - The report

Dear Sarah, Thank you for this helpful analysis, but I''m bound to say that I don''t agree with your view that the IPCC report brought it to life. I think the main issue is that it did not bring it to life ''in a way a seven year old could understand''. It was not ''from global to local'' as you suggest. Quite the opposite. It was too remote, generic, mathematical, and statistical in its presentation. Of course, it had to be scientifically accurate and present data clinically. But I would like to have seen a section that brought some of the data to life in a regionalised and personalised way; and I would also like to have seen greater connection between the data and the climatic events that we are currently witnessing. Example: the report stated that there is a risk that 10 million more homes could be lost to rising sea level. That invites a big ''so what?'' from decision-makers in governments. There are millions already dying of hunger around the world and we don''t react en masse to that. Likewise, I do not believe most people actually care about the coral reefs. What we need are predictions that really do localise the likely outcomes of a global failure to act. For example: ''do you like holidaying in Majorca? Well make the most of it because it will soon (insert likely date) be impossible owing to the regional increase in devastating storms''. To put it another way, we need some headline grabbing Sun and Daily Mail style journalism. I''m afraid the Guardian/Independent approach will not win the argument and win people over. By all means show me how I''m wrong... Best wishes, Nigel Aywin-Foster

Latte levy: Was the Chancellor right to reject a tax on disposable cups?

IAN BYRNE I think you are mistaken if a tax was levied the industry would probably pass responsibility for paper cup collections to the government, withdrawing financial support, and that could result in a reduction in paper cup recycling, whereas at the moment the industry is forecasting further gains The latte levy could have gone the same way as landfill tax, straight into the chancellor''s pot, never to be seen again

Latte levy: Was the Chancellor right to reject a tax on disposable cups?

I disagree, and think he should have taken the opportunity to impose a tax while the political environment for doing so is benign. A small tax is a perfect "nudge" signal. Matching the announcement with support for cup recycling facilities in the UK (perhaps hypothecating 25% of the revenue raised), and introducing it at a lower level of, say, 10p, could still have sent a signal. Arguments that adding 25p to the price of a hot drink would lead to the loss of 11,000 jobs seem totally unsupported by evidence. I''m a cyclist, and it''s a bit of a pain to have to carry round a reusable coffee cup - but I have managed it.

Latte levy: Was the Chancellor right to reject a tax on disposable cups?

I think the chancellor was wise not to tax paper cups, if in a years time recycling had dropped, and consumers were being taxed for no benefit it would be a political disaster, the industry is making progress 1:400 to 1:25 with further growth in the recycling of paper cups forecast, If it is not broken, do not try to fix it.

Air-cleaning technology fitted at Marylebone Station

For anyone who lives or works near Marylebone station, they will know what a joke this is. There have been complaints about BNP Paribas employees smoking on Harewood Avenue, littering the pavement with cigarette butts, leaving used coffee cups and cigarette butts on residents walls/floors. Sometimes there are so many employees smoking that they completely block the pavement and it is impossible to avoid breathing in the smoke. The employees migrate down the street and smoke and talk loudly by residents properties. Cleaner air, unless you re unfortunate enough to have BNP Paribas as your neighbour!

Air-cleaning technology fitted at Marylebone Station

Good to bring more attention to this issue, but it strikes me as using a feather to crack a nut - like so many things around our environment, from straws to take-away coffee cups. Putting these things outdoors is like putting an a/c unit on the platform in hot weather - it will make no difference unless you are up against the outlet. Sure, every little helps but unless meaningful action is taken this will be as effective in solving the underlying problem as not using straws will affect our oceans. However - if this raises awareness and gets members of the public to ask their employers and politicians what they are doing about the problems in their workplaces and homes as well as on the streets then it will help. I wish them WELL. Pun intended.

The EV industry viewpoint: Charging towards the future - E.ON Blog

I''m investigating electric charge points at my employer premises but apparently the standard charge point is incompatible with Tesla cars - this is frustrating and counter-intuitive to the sustainability agenda. Does anyone know if a simple adaptor can be used or do Tesla cars require a fundamentally different set-up? Thanks for reading.

From Green GB Week to baffling Budgets: There's still much to be done on sustainability - The report

Ken, why are just picking up on the issue of warnings of global warming? "The main impact [on all of us] will be felt beyond our normal business timelines ...... but the time for action is NOW [..in reducing pollution of all shapes..?] should be shouted from the rooftops, whatever waste it is - don''t you think? Now, reducing the generation of waste does not mean increasing your costs, I think.

Sir David King: Urgent focus needed on climate 'restoration'

C Alvin Scott: just read your comments. Let''s ignore the party politics and stick to science and engineering. Hydrogen may have many uses but it is not a source of energy, it is a means of moving it around - like electricity! Whatever you do to it to make it a fuel for mobility, you will get less energy out than you put in to make it in the first place - by liberating it from water or methane. We have no experience in the universe as we know it of a violation of this second law of thermodynamics. So promote it by all means, but don''t pretend it is an alternative to solar, wind, or fracking. Even Sir John Armitt got caught out that way recently - and he leads the National Infrastructure Commission...

Ultra-light EVs and emission-tracking satellites: The best green innovations of the week

Why am I reminded of the Robin Reliant???? Richard Phillips

Report: UK's EV stock grew by more than 50% last year, despite infrastructure challenges

Infrastructure is going to be the big stumbling block for EV''s. Until the charging infrastructure is as good as the current liquid fuel dispensers range anxiety is going to be a problem as is worrying about a charge point being available. For instance in Fort William there are 2 charge points hidden away in the "lorry and caravan" parking area behind the supermarket. 2 charge points for the whole town!! Until there are charge points in the supermarket car park, the main town car park and at other locations around the town there is always going to be an issue with getting access to a charge when you need it. Yes I know residents can charge at home so shouldn''t need them but we get a lot of visitors every year and it''s a 2 hr drive to Glasgow across wild country with limited charge points in between so demand for charge points will be high in the future. Then what about all the houses, apartments and flats that do not have off street parking? Where do they plug their EV in overnight to charge? Long extension cables across the pavement and hanging out the front window? The future of personal transportation is electric (especially in the big towns and cities) but until the infrastructure to support all forms of electric transport is in place it''s going to be a struggle for many.

Unintended consequences: Could the plastics phase-out lead to sustainability peril for businesses?

Ah Sarah, I thought that CO2 might come up at some stage!! There is a problem here, which the " we are going to hell in a handcart" lobby have made religion rather than a science out the situation. We do not know just how much CO2 is due to our activities. We do not know, at a molecular and greater level, just how CO2, at about one sixtieth of the concentration of our principal greenhouse gas, water vapour, has the huge influence attributed to it. The usual theory, that the CO2 helps to evaporate more water into vapour, when examined from a physical chemistry standpoint, it does not seem to carry such a great weight. That CO2 has an influence, undoubtedly. But how great? It is this degree of influence that bothers me, My analysis tells me that it is significantly smaller than is assumed by the IPCC. Richard Phillips

Floating solar farm to power water treatment works in Lancashire

What a great idea!

World Cement Association aligns climate action strategy with 2C trajectory

This does not seem to tell me how cement may be manufactured without generating CO2 from the heat generation stage. Am I missing something? Richard Phillips

HP and Ikea join commitment to create global supply chain for ocean-bound plastics

what is the carbon footprint of plastic bottles being made into cartridges for HP? versus their usual production?

HP and Ikea join commitment to create global supply chain for ocean-bound plastics

what is the carbon footprint of plastic bottles being made into cartridges for HP? versus their usual production?

Unintended consequences: Could the plastics phase-out lead to sustainability peril for businesses?

it''s not just about plastic...some changes may mean the CO2 we produce goes up..and that''s not useful to our planet!

Waitrose to use home-compostable bags in produce aisles and phase-out 5p carrier bags

but these bags are still pretty much single use and not all councils offer industrial composting so there could be potential for plastic contamination..there is no evidence these degrade any faster in a marine environment..what we really need is reusable bags or the need no to use bags ..

HP and Ikea join commitment to create global supply chain for ocean-bound plastics

This is all commendable stuff but to what extent will initiatives like this address any of the dirty, difficult to separate, low value plastic waste streams which are most likely to end up "ocean-bound"? Clean PET from drinks bottles is a potentially valuable resource as is high density PE but not so the mixed and contaminated plastics which are commonly dumped as too difficult to deal with. Could you also clarify the source of figures claiming up to 12 million tonnes of plastic is added to the ocean every year? In a related article in this publication the claim is for 8 million tonnes. Knowing the scale of the problem is difficult but very helpful.

Universities pledge to slash emissions in bid to lead UK's low-carbon transition

A really good initiative but to monitor you need to measure and unless the meters used to measure are correctly selected, installed and commissioned correctly it can be difficult assess improvements. We urge estates departments to develop a robust metering specification. We can help and we also undertake meter dilapidations reports. Quality meters as used by the UK water, gas, electricity and heat utilities should remain accurate for a minimum of 15 years.

Everything you may have missed: The sustainability success stories of Green GB Week

From Green Finance discussion in London and Stockholm - Green GB Week event London: https://youtu.be/x-9dR03DCL0 Stockholm - British Embassy: https://youtu.be/N-EmlwGQ9mE

Report: 46,000 new green jobs could be created in North of England by 2030

How old is this report? People have been saying this for a decade or more but it is not happening. ''Deeds not words'' was a slogan the suffragettes used in their campaign for the vote, and as the article points out there is opportunity, ''provided the government takes the critical policy action needed.'' Consulting with Purpose Ltd wrote a report in conjunction with SGURR Energy proposing Yorkshire and the Humber become a centre of excellence for all aspects of renewable energy in the mid 2000s for the Yorkshire and Humber Assembly unfortunately this was usurped by a coal report done at the same time which only advocated CCS.

Everything you may have missed: The sustainability success stories of Green GB Week

https://www.iucn.org/resources/issues-briefs/palm-oil-and-biodiversity

Everything you may have missed: The sustainability success stories of Green GB Week

As Executive Director of Orangutan Land Trust, an organisation that works on the issue of palm oil and its impacts for many years now, I am not impressed by the decision of Selfridges (and previously, Iceland) to remove all palm oil from their products. Experts agree that in order to drive change in the industry, brands and retailers must demand deforestation-free Certified Sustainable Palm Oil, and that a blanket boycott is counter-productive to this objective. I refer any readers interested in this to refer to the recent IUCN report "Palm Oil and Biodiversity."

Sir David King: Urgent focus needed on climate 'restoration'

I find it very sad that someone who used to be the UK''s Chief Scientist should now be promoting this sort of action on such flawed evidence. There is no sign of the climate needing to be "restored" whatever that might mean. The IPCC itself does not see any trend towards worse weather as the globe apparently heats up. A 1 degree rise since 1860 has resulted in nothing but good for mankind across the globe, and yet a further 0.5 degree rise is supposed to spell disaster. This is incredible and merely indicates that the climate scientists have failed to convince governments, and hence they need to ratchet up the rhetoric in the hope of scaring us into action - action that will make living conditions for billions across the planet much worse, condemning them to live without the sort of economic development we in the West enjoy. Meanwhile, most people go on living and most governments go on governing as if none of this is true, for which we can be truly thankful.

Sir David King: Urgent focus needed on climate 'restoration'

I find it very sad that someone who used to be the UK''s Chief Scientist should now be promoting this sort of action on such flawed evidence. There is no sign of the climate needing to be "restored" whatever that might mean. The IPCC itself does not see any trend towards worse weather as the globe apparently heats up. A 1 degree rise since 1860 has resulted in nothing but good for mankind across the globe, and yet a further 0.5 degree rise is supposed to spell disaster. This is incredible and merely indicates that the climate scientists have failed to convince governments, and hence they need to ratchet up the rhetoric in the hope of scaring us into action - action that will make living conditions for billions across the planet much worse, condemning them to live without the sort of economic development we in the West enjoy. Meanwhile, most people go on living and most governments go on governing as if none of this is true, for which we can be truly thankful.

BMW's closed-loop batteries and AI-powered beehives: The best innovations for Green GB Week

Regarding food waste, I buy organic produce from a small, local firm. As I live alone I am able to buy EXACTLY the amount of food I need, according to how many I am catering for in any one week. Buying in bulk results in waste. Supermarkets should sell vegetable and fruit items SINGLY, rather than in a bag of a set number. That would go a long way towards preventing waste.

BEIS Committee: Ban new petrol and diesel cars by 2032, not 2040

The Road to Hell is Paved With Good Intentions but it certainly isn''t awash with EV charging points. Until the plug in point is as common place and as easily accessed as the fuel pump the issue of battery range is always going to be an issue. Yes range has improved with many cars now boasting 300 miles on a full charge but that only equates to about 200 mile realistic range on an 80% charge (I''m giving a 20-30mile reserve in the tank). Yes that is about 3hrs on a motorway run by which time most drivers need a break but when there are 2 charging points in the service station can you imagine the chaos or the queues to charge up? Who wants to wait for an hour to plug in? Forget banning liquid fuel engines by a given date and work on developing the much needed charging and clean generation infrastructure. Fix the problem that city dwellers may face when they don''t have a permanent car parking space at their dwelling or if they live in a block of flats. Install charge points in every car parking space, every supermarket space, every office parking space. Make sure the electricity needed to recharge all these EV''s will come from a reliable, clean, non fossil fuel source (over 50% of all electricity generated in the UK is currently gas). Get the charging network sorted and range becomes much less of an issue. 200 miles would get me from my home to Glasgow Airport and home again (just) but having charging points along the way would mean less worry about traffic problems or having to sit for hours waiting for a charge point to become free. Living in a city would you actually need more than 100 mile range if your work place, supermarket and shopping mall all had charge points?

Big-name retailers collaborate to spur uptake of clean domestic fuels

Wood burning stoves are very popular. In a recent house-hunting couple of weeks, over half the semi-rural homes had these stoves. I do wonder if using the stoves would be breaking any regulations and if so how are the regulations enforced. And then we have Drax. Fired up on wood chips brought all the way from the rural parts of the USA and claiming to be a sustainable and renewable means of power generation. Which of these wood burning activities is the worse per tonne of heat or energy output the worst polluter?

Clean Growth Fund spearheads Government's green finance commitments

The key to getting communities involved in generating their own renewable energy would be to Make accessing the funds easier. Less wordy garble, more practical help to complete application and drop this totally unrealistic expectation that we can somehow fund and resource all the time and effort going into an application. Making it a competition is really insulting. Do you think we have the time and energy to play competition games ???? Simple criteria to meet. Simple access to funds. Installation success.

Ban Ki-moon: UK businesses must lead climate adaptation efforts to achieve Mission Possible

Adaptation or adaption?