Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Water - an under utilised resource? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Ray - everything we do has an impact on the environment, for instance Wind Turbines kill birds and have an impact on peat moorlands due to the concrete foundations. If the authorities at Albi can power 10,000 homes from a single water turbine with minimal impacts then I see no reason why our own large rivers can not be harnessed in the same manner. It has been done in Guildford off the Wey Navigation with virtually no impact at all. I lived by the Thames for a year and the lowest flow rate I observed (as recorded by the upstream flow meter at Reading Bridge) was 28 cubic metres per second (Q). This equates to a potential 400KW at Caversham Lock. At 100Q, which I observed on many an occasion throughout the year, the potential is 1.4MW. 400KW would power approximately 100 homes or a hospital or a school. Every kw that is not generated from hydrocarbon and that can be sustainably produced should be. It is not beyond the realms of engineering to prevent wildlife (and rubbish) going through the turbine and many existing impediments to fish migration have already been overcome so not exactly difficult to avoid that problem. Even if we just looked at harnessing the volume of heat energy disappearing down our rivers it could make a dramatic difference to the UK energy balance/budget.

European Commission moves to Brexit-proof Emissions Trading System

These people are refusing to see that Hydrogen could be developed into the fuel of the future. Modified Oxy-Hydrogen for instance for arcraft. On board the EV On demand Hydrogen production linked to the needs of the engine will be the future. The present directions of BEVs and H2 Fuel Cells are far more difficult, especially with monumental high costs, for increased battery production and increased Generating capacity/battery storage, to get to scale to meet CO2 emissions targets. There has to be a serious look into Hydrogen combustion, since manufacturing Hydrogen engines for EVs does not need any significant increase in the Engine Manufacturing Industry. Given some quotes of $ trillions for Battery Plants and new power stations and Grid, to be able to maintain present production costs must be a massive pointer to look at new innovation which is being stifled by tentacles of the Fossil Fuels Industry. One particular H2 innovation, promises to be the Game changer. Hydrogen at 99.999% production unit able to be fitted for use on board a car and other vehicles.(Needs to be compact for restrictions in size) The development of a unit which produces 99.999% hydrogen has been aimed at Fuel Cells and was effective in stationary tests. There have been difficulties encountered with the Fuel Cell EV moving during road/track testing. It should be noted that Fuel Cell manufacture faces similar difficulties as Batteries when it comes to scaling up to produce multi millions of EVs to meet targets. Not only costs of raw materials but mass production has just reached 40,000 units per year from a new China Factory and 100,000 per year from what has been called the "Cambridge Method". Whilst these factories cost $ Millions 100,000 units may meet early demand however to produce any significant number of FCEVs there will need to be many such factories. 1,000,000 units per year = 10 factories and to meet targets by 2050 there will need to hundreds of such factories. The reality is that existing Global Engine Manufacturing Industry already has the capacity which allowed 60 million new vehicle sales in 2016. Developing a Hydrogen combustion engine would without doubt allow the "massive scale-up" required whilst avoiding the monumental costs of BEVs and FCEVs A Hydrogen combustion engine-generator EV with "On board On demand fuel production" would maintain existing prices for new cars and other vehicles. This factor alone would allow mass roll out of Zero emissions EVs. The fact that hydrogen on demand systems would allow onsite Off-grid generation will also be the way to decarbonise housing. Hydrogen is the Future, it is just not the present view of the best use of Hydrogen. Like Betamax v VHS the Fuel Cell is most efficient use of hydrogen however a H2 Combustion engine powered EV will be afforded by the masses.

Get the latest business guide - edie Explains energy resilience

It is not only businesses which can suffer severe consequences should the Grid supply fail. Family households, even without special needs, can be at a crisis, depending upon circumstances at the time. All this is brought about by the increasing introduction of intermittent renewable generators, unable to respond to demand, triggering the need for ever more complex control networks. And should a hacker get into this network......... The recent admission that forecasts of the degree of global warming have been overestimated by all climate models, should sound an alarum bell. Is official anxiety guided by the science, or by renewable business interests? Richard Phillips

Water - an under utilised resource? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Not the case in the UK. There are often droughts, rivers are at low flows and levels than ever before since privatisation of UK water companies bought by foreign investors, because of over abstraction by water companies to supply commercial businesses, car washes, golf courses and other water wasters. It is a fact that UK Rivers and Streams, boreholes and water tables are drying up after being sucked dry. The hydro- electric turbines placed in UK rivers kill fish, wildfowl and wildlife and stop or deter natural fish migration, plus they produce minimal electricity that only benefits the private individual that placed it there to profiteer.

New airplane biofuels plan would 'destroy rainforests', warn campaigners

We need to ramp up the production of suitable fuel derived from waste plastics. It''s no good using more virgin resources when we are struggling to cope with the amount of packaging waste we discard.

Fasten your seat belt, sustainable air travel is preparing for take-off - The Simply Sustainable blo

While all these attempts are welcomed, a real change to the aviation''s effect on the environment will only come from re-thinking the current aircraft design. the majority of fuel consumption is attributed to overcoming drag forces, eliminating, and/or reducing these forces would bring about real change. see this concept of such design re-thinking. http://airplane.greentransport.tech

Fasten your seat belt, sustainable air travel is preparing for take-off - The Simply Sustainable blo

Hi Nicola. Great article. Unfortunately batteries are too heavy and have too low an energy density per kg to be be viable for electric aircraft. Fuels cells are the answer as is currentpy being demonstrated with long range drones.

World petrol demand 'likely to peak by 2030 as electric car sales rise'

The statement that "more efficient engines" is seriously question by the "On Road Testing" of two old cars. (BBC Program) An old Golf petrol versus a 10 yo Skoda diesel son and dads cars just as an idea to test the cars which turned into a program. The outcome must cause great concern, because when the data on these two cars was compared with the data collected from newer cars/engines the newer engines latest models were not as good as these two engines even though they had completed many thousands of miles. The concern is that the latest engines are promoted by Politicians and the Companies as being cleaner. It is clearly time that politicians distance themselves from these companies and the companies who carry out the original test producing figure which are a fiction. Sorry I keep saying this, there is only one way forward and that is Zero emissions EVs and I do not mean EVs which plug into a grid which is about 50% Fossil Fuel and likely to get worse with millions of EVs. (Hence fracking) Nor do I mean H2 Fuel Cells at over 50,000 it is clear why they are supported by the likes of Shell. Fuel Cells mean Oil will continue for decades. BEVs also have a number of hurdles facing mass take up and the costs can be seen as monumental. BEVs are not going to meet the target of 2050 because it will take at least 10 years to build out the infrastructure which will need Trillions of $ There is a need to develop a Hydrogen engine-generator, lowest cost option to have multi millions of Zero Emissions EVs on the road at affordable prices. In conjunction they need to develop Hydrogen On Board the EV or buy a licence from the team in the US who have a prototype Unit for Fuel Cells

World's first floating wind farm opens off the Scottish coast

However, please note that "1MWh" Batwind is not going "to mitigate intermittency, lower costs and optimise the energy output from the wind park to the grid" in this context but rather it is a grossly inadequate capacity of energy storage for any 30MW wind farm. My recommendation is for energy storage of 5 hours times the generation capacity - so 5 hours x 30MW = 150MWh. It doesn''t have to be exactly "150MWh". The configuration rows in my calculator http://scottish.scienceontheweb.net/Wind%20power%20storage%20back-up%20calculator.htm?wind=30#wind range from 144MWh to 160MWh. But just to be clear. That''s someone in Statoil who thinks "1MWh" is appropriate and whilst I am a big fan of the Hywind Scotland floating wind farm project, I in no way whatsoever endorse, agree with, or would accept the ridiculous suggestion that a "1MWh" battery is going to be any use whatsoever. "1MWh" energy storage is a token, a gimmick, an unscientific suggestion that someone maybe came up with at a meeting, saying something like "Hey, maybe we should tack on some storage!". You know, without having done any calculations as to what is actually required. Then maybe someone else piped up "Yeah, that''s a great idea - let''s tack on some storage". And that''s it. There''s nothing else and there''s no excuse for it other than - "They simply didn''t know what they were doing".

World's first floating wind farm opens off the Scottish coast

Talking about storing energy from wind farms, did you know that only 90 miles to the west of Peterhead, near Inverness there is a site that could be developed to build a truly colossal pumped-storage hydro scheme? STRATHDEARN PUMPED-STORAGE HYDRO SCHEME (up to 180 GW / 6,800 GWh) World''s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? I have published a map which shows how and where the biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme could be built - Strathdearn in the Scottish Highlands. Energy storage capacity The scheme requires a massive dam about 300 metres high and 2,000 metres long to impound about 4.4 billion metres-cubed of water in the upper glen of the River Findhorn. The surface elevation of the reservoir so impounded would be as much as 650 metres when full and the surface area would be as much as 40 square-kilometres. The maximum potential energy which could be stored by such a scheme is colossal about 6800 Gigawatt-hours or 283 Gigawatt-days enough capacity to balance and back-up the intermittent renewable energy generators such as wind and solar power now in use for the whole of Europe! Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/ * Wind, storage and back-up system designer * Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme * Off-Shore Electricity from Wind, Solar and Hydrogen Power * World s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? * Modelling of wind and pumped-storage power * Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020 * South America GREAT for Renewable Energy

World's first floating wind farm opens off the Scottish coast

Thank you and good luck to all involved with the Scotland Hywind floating wind farm project. I have suggestions for integrating wind farms into the electricity grid so as to provide power on demand whatever the weather. Wind, storage and back-up system designer Peak demand, wind and back-up power / energy usage and storage capacity calculator For the specification and design of renewable energy electricity generation systems which successfully smooth intermittent wind generation to serve customer demand, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year. Offshore wind farms can use onshore energy storage facilities such as pumped-storage hydro but there are also possibilities to use offshore energy storage technologies such as power-to-gas, making hydrogen from water and storing it either in high pressure tanks on the surface or there is another possibility too, which I will mention now. Deep Sea Hydrogen Storage I''ve published a diagram which shows how hydrogen gas can be used to store energy from renewable-energy platforms floating at sea by sending any surplus wind and solar electrical power down a sub-sea cable to power underwater high-pressure electrolysis to make compressed hydrogen to store in underwater inflatable gas-bags. It''s potentially very cheap because no super-strong pressure containment vessels are required - the ambient hydrostatic pressure which is proportional to depth serves to compress the hydrogen gas to containable densities.

How P&G formed a new supply chain to combat ocean plastics

Paul, the bottles are recyclable through the usual plastics recycling infrastructure. P&G confirmed the following: "The bottles are recyclable in a real-world setting due to the color and clarity being targeted (clear/translucent). Sorting and recycling facilities will test the material after it is made, but the bottle will be identified as PET, kicked into the PET pile at MRF, and recovered for reprocessing."

How P&G formed a new supply chain to combat ocean plastics

Report: Preservation policies could hamper Clean Growth Strategy's household efficiency plans

I completely agree with Michael Mann below. I live in a ''B'' listed early 18th Century property in Scotland. Over the past couple of years, I have worked hard to improve my homes energy efficiency and have installed fantastic British sourced sheep wool insulation, and insulating plasterboard / wooden cladding. I have also invested in a biomass boiler. The property looks much as it did when it was built in 1729, however, it is now comfortably warm and as damp free as an old building can be. More importantly, I have taken the property from an EPC energy efficiency rating of ''G'' to a far more respectful high ''D'' rating. If I invested in solar thermal / solar PV, I would be able to achieve the governments 2028 band ''C'' target for all rented accommodation. I feel I have future-proofed my home without compromising its historical beauty. There are a lot of old stone homes where I live, and they are in general cold, damp, and with a lot of rot. However, tackling the issues has made me absolutely aware of how my home was put together and what the best options for my home were.

Report: Preservation policies could hamper Clean Growth Strategy's household efficiency plans

I am really glad that the Grantham Research Institute has highlighted this important issue. I have thought for a long time that listed building status and conservation zones are impeding energy efficiency. They are a problem for disabled access measures too. I think museums are for visiting, not for living in!

Fasten your seat belt, sustainable air travel is preparing for take-off - The Simply Sustainable blo

Since when is any bio fuel in quantity going to be sustainable from a production perspective and burning it in internal combustion engines of any type is still going to contribute to CO, nitrides and particulates. Electric flight is still many decades off - Jet engines produce in excess of 30MW each so battery power 3000 Tesla battery packs per engine per hour - not going to happen. Electric flight will be slow! It would be much better if the airlines and airfield operators got together to reduce stacking as that is unproductive flight and focussed on electrifying / de-fossilising airport operations - no more diesel generators for starting and leaving a gas turbine running to provide air-con. Using electric airside vehicles etc. There are lots of small wins to start the ball rolling.

Fasten your seat belt, sustainable air travel is preparing for take-off - The Simply Sustainable blo

Really exciting to hear this progress and promise in the airline industry. Do you think similar game changes Are coming in the Cruise-liner industry which is in rapid growth?

The impact of the Modern Slavery Act, two years on - The Radley Yeldar blog

Really informative article. Thankyou. Let s hope the pace of change keeps building so that we see real positive impact for the long term.

Report: Preservation policies could hamper Clean Growth Strategy's household efficiency plans

Windows do not save a lot... The real issues here are the floors, walls, and roofs. The government should undertake trials and promote solutions that allow and enable retrofits that do not destroy the character but make these buildings comfortable and healthy, as well as energy efficient. There are multiple issues here - radon, damp, and rot, as well as conservation officers who think their job means ''do/allow nothing contemporary''. We should accept that our world needs to modernise and that we cannot leave many hundreds of thousands of buildings to stagnate and decline whilst the world moves on (for the better). Character and appearance need not be sacrificed for lower carbon.

Lloyd's of London first insurer to back kWh guarantee for solar installations

A bit like breakdown insurance on my boiler, in fact. Richard Phillips

How P&G formed a new supply chain to combat ocean plastics

Excuse the stupid question, but is this new Fairy bottle recyclable in local Council/Borough kerbside schemes? Or does the enhanced recycled content make it more difficult to recycle?

Will the UK reach its carbon budget targets with the Clean Growth Strategy?

The Clean Energy Plan includes new nuclear power which is not low carbon, not safe and hugely expensive. Greg Clarke must rule out any new nuclear build and enforce a zero emissions policy on all decommissioning and waste contracts to comply with the 2012 Health and Social Care Act requirement to protect the public from exposure to nuclear radiation.

Government makes £557m available for new renewables projects

Keiron - Yes, tidal streams need no walls, but the geographically suitable areas for them are very limited. The Pentland Firth is almost ideal, but, like all tidal streams has its maxima and minima, zero. Standards of living have risen in keeping with energy availability at an economic price, I see no reason to place artificial caps on this trend. Fast reactors offer a very long term electricity generation system, using the 238 at present of little value. Long term let is hope that ITER or laser systems offer permanent solutions. Agree on the significance of the CO2 scenario. I like H.L.Mencken "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed and hence clamorous to be led to safety by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." Sums it up, I think. Richard

Government makes ?557m available for new renewables projects

Richard - one of the pluses of tidal stream turbines is there is no need to build a wall across an estuary so no sedimentation issue, which I agree is a major issue for any hydro scheme that relies on a dam (such as the Swansea Bay Barrage). Biggest issue really is to get everyone to accept we are all energy hogs. Our modern life relies on reliable, instantaneous energy and our demand for that energy has only increased. Up to now we have been relying on hydrocarbons of one form or another as they have been relatively easy to exploit. Trying to change the fuel source for our continuing energy demand is always going to be difficult as we have become accustomed to power being there all the time. CO2 is a convenient scapegoat as it can be measured and taxed. Energy or more accurately Heat is the problem. 7 billion people produce a lot of waste in the form of heat which thanks to the blanket of gases surrounding the planet can not escape so builds up. CO2 levels have been significantly higher throughout geological history (and significantly lower too). It is very "egocentric" to think the last 200 years represent the norm for Earth climate. In the last 425,000 years global temperature has been as much as 4 C higher than present and 8 C colder. In fact if you were to draw the average line across the last 425,000 years the global average temperature would be around 5 C colder than humans currently think is the norm. I agree and have little confidence in the politicians

Government makes £557m available for new renewables projects

Kieron - The heat input to any generating plant has be controlled, not just throttling of the turbines. This was how the system an up and down, the coal input was varied to match the turbine demand, no other way. Old stations ran at a low level (they were the most expensive), and called into play for peak demand. The power output from a modern reactor, PWR, is much more flexible that the older UK graphite moderated reactors which inevitably had a large heat capacity. The erstwhile PWR at Dounreay could be shut down by simply turning everything off, thermo syphon then cooled it down. It was regarded as a real pussycat. The locations around our coast for tidal or other marine power is very limited. River estuary schemes are subject to serious sedimentation, little mentioned. The Aswan dam is bedevilled by this problem, the drop of about a metre in the fields is because the rich fertile replacement soil is in Lake Nasser!!! Moving water has power, but it has to above a minimum. There is very little suitable geography left in the UK for hydro schemes. I have no great faith in so-called energy storage schemes, the energy density is just not in them. Try finding a way to store the energy of the combustion of a piece of coal in the same volume as the coal!! Yes, I have LPG. Air source heat pumps should be a lot cheaper, but too many in one place, a city for instance, could be an overcooling problem. Why is there such a hoo-ha over CO2, its effect is largely logarithmic. I have the feeling that it is driven as much as anything by the he amounts of money to be made by terrifying the population, who cannot answer back in scientific terms. I am sure we could agree on much, certainly on no confidence in political answers!!!! Richard

Government makes ?557m available for new renewables projects

@ Richard - Fair point that in the olden days there was a degree of flexibility from coal fired stations but if memory serves me right that did not mean the furnaces were switched on and off but that the steam turbines were "throttled". The same basic principle applies to nuclear although you can increase the number of control rods to slow the reactor it still remains active (and HOT). That''s more what I meant by 24/7 running. Tidal streams are periodic but tides and associated streams vary in time around the coast so there is always a flood or ebb tide somewhere. With tidal streams in estuaries of our biggest rivers when the flood stream slows the flow of the river takes up the slack water so the water is never stationary. Moving water has power. Now I''d prefer to have new hydro plants built in the Highlands as the pipes are a lot less intrusive in the visual environment than wind turbines and I''m sure there must be a way to disguise the pipes even more (even just painting them green helps). There was an article a wee while ago about converting all the traditional hydro stations around Loch Lomond to PSH thereby increasing the national storage capacity for an average difference in water level in the loch of a couple of inches +/-. Where there is a will there is a way. What about Compressed Air Storage? The technology exists off the shelf for this. Compressors, Turbines, Pressure Vessels and valves are all readily available. This should be a viable option for large scale energy storage if only there was the desire to do the R&D. Have to agree totally with you about the cybersecurity threat. This was highlighted a little while ago when someone discovered there was absolutely no security at a wind turbine site so it was perfectly possible to hack in and override the control systems. One of the big issues facing sustainable energy is not so much generation of electricity but provision of "clean" heat. Where I live we do not have mains gas so we either use bottled propane or more commonly fuel oil for central heating and hot water. Given the distinct lack of sunlight during the winter solar heating is not viable and I''m not convinced on the viability of Air Source Heat Pumps (or for that matter Ground Source as it could be very easy to freeze the ground). Wind turbines are never going to heat my house but perhaps Loch Linnhe could through a community Water Source Heat Pump. Again this is a new(ish) technology that could benefit from this Government money. I''m sure if we scientists and engineers bang our heads together we can come up with lots of efficient, clean solutions if we were given the money.

Government makes £557m available for new renewables projects

Kieron - it is not "given" that coal, nuclear and to some extent gas run 24/7. Not so long ago all generating plant was coal fired, and was able, under manual control, to follow a fluctuating demand, quite satisfactorily. It is somewhat simpler for gas plant to operate in this fashion, its reduced heat capacity. The old UK nuclear plant is not so flexible, but modern PWRs are flexible, how did an almost totally nuclear system operate in France if this were not so? All this plant operated on a demand lead basis. No renewable is able to do this, with the exception of hydro, but this dates back to the origins of electricity and is now pretty well at saturation point, and thus of limited capacity. What are the "newer technologies"? All marine sources are periodic, and vary over both long and short time-scales. Storage on an industrial scale is not achievable with present technologies, it is still at least two orders of magnitude away. New concepts, the solid state battery MAY open up a larger scale use; but it has to be economic. The search for "satisfactory" electrical generation, waste-free and cheap and on-demand at the full scale, cannot be derived from the low energy sources provided by nature. Thermodynamics and the consequent engineering negates it. With all the elaborate computer control systems needed, have you considered the consequences of a nasty minded hacker getting into this lot?? They got into the Pentagon. Richard Phillips All renewables demand more and more complex control systems in order to try and make a little go a long way. It doesn''t. The hole gets ever deeper and more expensive, calm desperation; simply because our political masters, scientifically and engineering-wise pathetically unknowledgeable, are in the thrall of the Industry lobby.

Government makes ?557m available for new renewables projects

@Richard - given coal, nuclear and to a certain extent gas generating stations run 24/7 as they are not exactly simple to switch on and off at a moments notice is this a fair comparison to make? I agree that wind and solar particularly do suffer from the vagaries of the British weather (too much wind, not enough wind, too much cloud etc) but many newer technologies could prove to be much more stable and investment in storage could give the "instant" demand response.

Reaction round-up: What does the green economy make of the Clean Growth Strategy?

A long list of people representing Clean Energy with only one from Client Earth which really challenges this document as yet again "long on speech lacking in ant substantial/factual detail. As far as I am concerned the Issues of Air Quality and Global Warming caused by CO2 and other Green House Gas emissions, is not just a Tory issue or just the Government. It should be Cross Party and involve the entire population none less than those under the present voting age. On that based Brexit should not affect what is put forward and what is decided. The UK and the world cannot keep putting off decisions Hard decisions for ever, there has to be a stop to these "all talk paper" . I suggest that first and foremost they have to call out Fossil Fuels. Yes the UK and France have made a ambiguous statement regarding a Ban on the sale of new diesel and petrol vehicles 2040. Is that all diesel and petrol or just some diesel and petrol engines? This is another cop out, It should read that "The combustion of Fossil Fuels have to stop, which will include Transport and Electricity generation. The Government have brushed on going over changing the Gas Grid to Hydrogen which is the most positive statement that Houses burning Natural Methane Gas are in fact 5 times worse than the family petrol car. I am concerned that people refer to the death of the Internal Combustion Engine, it is not the engine but the Hydrocarbon fuels which is combusted. Hydrogen can and will be combusted in engines to drive generators for EVs in much the same way as a Fuel Cell generates electricity on board the EV. It concerns me that over a billion has been squandered on Carbon Capture and store. I say squandered because there is no system which works and some people making out the potential of such systems have become very rich. What really amazes me is the complete lack of a mention of Hydrogen. Hydrogen is well known as Zero emissions in use. In combustion it does not have a carbon element so it does not cause CO2 emissions when combusted So WHY are people not developing a Hydrogen Zero emissions engine????? As a person with a concept for a Hydrogen Hybrid Rotary Engine-generator, I am convinced that there is a deliberate and concerted action to stifle such concepts/projects. Not accepted for TDAP run by Advanced Propulsion Centre UK and yet 5 new/improved petrol engine projects were accepted for Technology Developer Accelorater Program. There is also a second Hydrogen Rotary Engine in Scotland and I know for a fact that he has experienced the same lack of support for Hydrogen. There is H2 ICE the adaptation of existing diesel engines as Hydrogen Hybrid engines to act as replacements for existing diesel engines. Since 2008-9 and the granting of the UK Patent covering Hydrogen supply for vehicles via batteries, I have seen that "On Demand" Hydrogen production on board the EV as the future. The 2015 improvements which brought about HyPulJet.2.0 will I believe lead to lower fuel use and once the prototype engine is running the level of fuel can be assessed and the size of an On Board system could be worked out. This Hydrogen production unit would produces hydrogen as close as possible to the needs of the engine, without the need for super High pressure storage. People reading this may be dismayed to find that such thinking is being stifled by these people who make out that they are looking for Zero emissions. Time for a New Body with the straight forward remit to develop Zero emissions Road Vehicles. For those who are not aware there are several systems on the internet which are genuine concepts which produce variations of Hydrogen Grainis Bulgaria is an excellent example. By far and away the most exciting new innovation is to be found in New Mexico US where a small team have reworked a project arrived at several years ago. This produces 99.999% Hydrogen for an exceptionally low electrical input. The H2 unit worked to produced expected results in the lab/garage however in our last contact they were having difficulty with the Fuel Cell on the road. I suggested that it was more than likely Impurities being caused in the system by the movement of the EV. I am waiting for my Global Hydrogen Ambassadors Group contact, to complete the trial/assessment and make the final appraisal. We can then discuss how he will assist in making on board Hydrogen fuel for HyPulJet.2.0 powered EVs a reality. I would point out that a H2 Fuel Cell needs 99.999% pure Hydrogen otherwise the membrane clogs up and does not produce electricity, these impurities are minute amounts of air and parts thereof. Combustion of Hydrogen in a engine will not experience any such problem, it will continue to run perfectly well. This will be a clear advantage over Fuel Cells when it comes to On board H2 production. There is a much more important benefit to be gained by going out all out to develop a hydrogen Combustion Engine. It is clear that the existing engine manufacturing industry, already has the capacity to manufacture 40 to 50 million units per year (2016 level was above 50 million.) This option would cut the need for monumental cost levels for additional infrastructure and additional generating capacity. In terms of Hydrogen, there will not be a need for a national network of H2 Filling stations, again a massive saving in funding. The result of this being, Zero Emissions Hydrogen EVs at affordable prices bringing about a major roll out of Zero Emissions Transport. Even if the cost of developing a Hydrogen engine is in the region of 5 million that is small change even if it does not work when considering that it could save Trillions over the next decade. The HyPulJet.2.0 is basically two phases, one is the combustion of hydrogen, the second which I term Hybrid is to introduce a spray of water to turn this engine into ... Internal Combustion Steam Turbine. So why is it not being supported by the Auto Industry et al? Is it perhaps that it could work and bring about complete disruption to what has developed around Fossil Fuels. Welcome to the Hydrogen Era.

Reaction round-up: What does the green economy make of the Clean Growth Strategy?

"this Strategy sets out for the first time how over 2.5 billion will be invested by the Government to support low carbon innovation from 2015 to 2021" - The Clean Growth Strategy Image - https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a424210befe139337424f078caca1aa81aee040d4d9a53781bb298784021d2b2.jpg - artist''s impression of what "saving the planet with the pocket money of 2.5 bn every 6 years" gets you. Now if it had been 2.5bn of investment per week, 130bn a year, 780bn from 2015 to 2021 - I would say - "that''s above and beyond what I dared to dream of - excellent well done the Tory government!" If it had only been 2.5bn of investment per month, 30bn a year, 180bn from 2015 to 2021 - I would say - "not bad for a Tory, not really enough for the progress we could and should be making but it''s enough to make a start until a new government with more ambitious plans takes over at the next election" If it had only been 2.5bn of investment per year, 15 bn from 2015 to 2021 - I would say - "this is gross irresponsibility and dereliction of duty - I call on the the local government and people of London to arrest this Tory government as atmosphere polluters" But as it is only 2.5bn from 2015 to 2021 what I have to say is best left unsaid and to the imagination! Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/

edie roundtable: Driving renewables through the supply chain

This is a great outline of why we created the National Green Standard - the Standard is based on People, Planet, Profit and underpinned by UN Global Goals. It is independently assessed and recognition is at green or gold level based on a scoring system. The ethos is around CSR and ethical working from an end to end perspective. If you want more info email msmscluskey@btinternet.com

From CCS to zero waste: Clean Growth Strategy to slash emissions and boost economic growth

Although this synopsis of this Clean Growth Strategy cannot cover every aspect it is regretable that there is no mention of hydrogen powered vehicles which are far superior to battery powered EVs, as the refuelling time is the same as hydrocarbon fuels, ie a few minutes, and they don''t have to carry around a huge weight of batteries that are expensive and of limited life. The problem for hydrogen power vehicles (which do include some batteries) is the severe shortage of public filling stations when all the Government can talk about is their investment in EV charging points. This misguided strategy is demonstrated by the remarks of Minister Jesse Norman "..and the creation of one of the best charging networks in the world" when Germany and other countries are way ahead of the UK in charging networks, as well as for hydrogen filling. Its time that our Government learned a bit more about efficient clean power and what the rest of the world is doing. Where was the mention of the ITER nuclear fusion project?

Smart Coca-Cola dispensers to help university students slash soft drinks packaging

Sustainable packaging is good, but as the Carbon Trust found (1), "packaging accounts for between 30-70% of the total carbon cost of the drink. Therefore the measures implemented by The University of Reading tackles only part of the problem. The ease of use of these cola dispensers (low friction payments) and the clever marketing (greenwashing) will increase purchases of the drink, negating any Co2 saving due to the better packaging. (1) https://www.carbontrust.com/media/5888/cts287-coca-cola.pdf

Government makes £557m available for new renewables projects

It might be interesting to know just what these new projects are, and whether they are of such a nature as to be able to generate electricity on demand; a characteristic hitherto totally absent from the renewable sector. A crippling disability. Richard Phillips

Joining forces to fight food poverty - The FoodCycle blog

Poverty is the major problem faced by many countries these days. Many people around the world are affected due to the problem of poverty. Poverty is particularly intractable where people did not receive proper food, medical facilities, etc. for the betterment of their lives. People around the world are helping less fortunate people by providing them proper facilities. Joining an NGO and becoming a volunteer is another way to help the humanity for a better cause. Mission humanitaire ( http://www.mission-humanitaire-afrique.org/ ) volunteer deals with some task to help the humanity.

How P&G formed a new supply chain to combat ocean plastics

Don''t wait for 2018 - BUY 100% PCR PACKAGING NOW! Whilst P & G''s pledge is commendable - there is NO mention here of the fact that a UK company has ALREADY pioneered 100% packaging which consumers and operators can already buy NOW.... Delphis Eco (holder of two royal warrants) has launched its leading eco cleaning chemicals in 100% PCR packaging in a landmark move - check out www.delphiseco.com for details of the range. Caroline

Government makes ?557m available for new renewables projects

What does it mean by "less established" when Greenpeace talk about "offshore wind"? Surely wind power is now established and no longer needs any government support. "Less established" means, to me at least, those opportunities that are still in their infancy or even those still very much in the experimental stage. Technologies like Water Source Heat Pumps, Tidal Stream Turbines or even the "evaporation motor" that is under development. Alternatively this money should be invested into large scale energy storage systems but not chemical batteries. We have an opportunity to really expand our sustainable power system so let''s not waste it by building more wind turbines.

HP launches new supplier emissions target and cartridges made from plastic bottles

Guys, don''t become a bait to duplicate HP Ink cartridges. If you want to buy the original ones at a reasonable price, Violet Office Supplies is a piece of cake. Just checkout their offers once. Here is the link. https://www.violetofficesupplies.co.uk/brand/hp/

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

I have to agree with the comments made regarding the SNP. Whilst I''m not affiliated with any party in particular, it seems nieve to ignore the third largest party in the UK by membership.

Plastic packaging: Are producers ready for their 'diesel moment'?

Which major petrochemical company will make the first move to switch from petro to bio based plastic supply?

IKEA moves step closer to 'energy independence' as sales rise

Ikea sells solar panels in store but has anyone ever seen any solar installations on the roof of an Ikea store? Instead of buying more wind turbines perhaps Ikea could lead the way with store mounted solar generation to utilise the wasted acreage above our heads.

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

its a shame you didn''t report the conservatives commitment to developing shale gas in the UK

Smart Coca-Cola dispensers to help university students slash soft drinks packaging

It''s great to see some innovation in the re-fillable space, but essentially students are still being offered drinks that we know are linked to diseases such as diabetes and obesity. Holistic thinking and decision making needs to be in place to be truly sustainable.

EU Commission taken to court over new emissions tests for vehicles

Shame that Greenpeace and the Green party are not making more noise about this as well instead of playing politics and slowly becoming extinct. All credit to ClientEarth for keeping the pressure on.

EU Commission taken to court over new emissions tests for vehicles

Without a doubt the people of the EU and I most certainly include the UK in that EU, need to show their Unanimous support for Client Earth. There is also the need for organisations such as edie.net to get begin to investigate why there are Zero Emissions innovation in the public domain which is not being developed. That such innovation is being deliberately side lined by those Groups making funding decisions, which includes Government funding and support. Like this joining of Government and Industry on existing Fossil Fuel Engines there is also a "joining" of Government and Industry which is stopping the move to Lower-cost Zero emissions Hydrogen Vehicles. Reason, Industry = Death of Oil and Gas ----Government = Loss of Tax Revenue stream and the need to completely rethink Taxation.

Report: CCS could boost UK economy by ?160bn

To fully achieve the environmental benefits of CCS it MUST be accompanied by UTILIZATION so that we find uses for the Carbon rather than simply storing huge quantities which, over time, could escape, with major environmental and health and safety implications

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

It is very disappointing that Edie has chosen to ignore the contribution of the governing party for Scotland and announce that the party conference season has concluded. The SNP conference is ongoing as I write. A party which has probably done more through their adoption of green policies and their commitment to renewables than the other 3 parties mentioned. Very sad that their contribution has not been recognised.

Raising the bar on sustainability: Not just

Agree totally that we need to look at the whole picture with regard to sustainability and not just the "green"ness of something. You hit the nail on the head when you said about turning the whole thing on its head. Wind turbines may sound green but when you add in the petrochemicals required to build them, move them, plant them, service them etc they suddenly aren''t so green. Add in the visual impact in the Highlands of miles of roads bulldozed across moorland and peat bogs, acres of concrete for the foundations which change the hydrological balance of the area then we really do have to question the sustainability of this kind of infrastructure. Then you mentioned the elephant in the room which is what do we do with all the batteries, panels, turbines etc when they come to the end of their working lives? In the case of batteries could we end up with a massive pollution problem from millions of unusable chemical batteries? I know a basic Lead Acid battery (such as your car battery) is 98% reusable/reclaimable/recyclable but what about the 2%? How much of a modern Lithium Ion battery is R/R/R? Thank you for highlighting this aspect and I look forward to seeing a shift from just being "seen to be green" and actual Sustainabilty

Three very good ways with food waste - The FoodCycle blog

Good to read!

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

I don''t recommend "Carbon Capture and Storage" because it is impossible guarantee carbon dioxide gas won''t leak, I do favour a new public sector British Green Investment Bank or equivalent capitalised with 100 billion a year borrowed interest-free from the Bank of England and I''d be happy to server as Governor or Chief Scientific Adviser to such an investment bank. Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/ * Wind, storage and back-up system designer * Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme * Off-Shore Electricity from Wind, Solar and Hydrogen Power * World s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? * Modelling of wind and pumped-storage power * Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020 * South America GREAT for Renewable Energy

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

In a subsequent email to the UK Government BEIS, I wrote .. The Double Tidal Lagoon should be the preferred option for lagoons of all sizes, smaller as well as larger . The double lagoon offers operability in either the valuable dispatchable power-on-demand mode or continual baseload power mode neither of which the single lagoon design can do. My dual lagoon scheme does not imply a significant increase in capital cost compared to the single lagoon design offered by Tidal Lagoons Plc for Swansea Bay. Admittedly, the double lagoon needs an additional partioning wall between the high and low lagoons, whose length as a percentage of the equivalent single lagoon design depends on the particular layout of the scheme but for example consider a single lagoon whose walls describe a circle which can be converted to a double lagoon by adding a diameter partition where the increase in the total wall length is only equal to the ratio of a diameter to a circumference of a circle or 1/PI or about 32%. The cost per length of wall is not fixed but it depends on design, if it is fit for purpose or whether it is more expensive than it needs to be because it has been over engineered. To take our example again, the cost of a wall of length 132% can be no more than the cost of a wall of length 100% if the cost per length of the wall of length 132% can be reduced by a factor of 100/132 or about 75%. The cost per wall of the Tidal Lagoon Plc s proposed Swansea Bay plan can easily be reduced to 75% or less because their plan proposes lagoon walls which would be greatly over-engineered for the lagoon wall purpose so as to function in addition as a superfluous and expensive road and footpath for recreational purposes. A simple lagoon wall that is not also a road and footpath will have a lower cost per length and that s how to make a longer wall cost the same or less than a shorter over-engineered wall. The Charles Hendry independent review of tidal lagoons is fatally flawed for the following reason. Hendry concludes it offers limited dispatchability oblivious to (or in denial of) the fact that the double lagoon design offers good dispatchability, unlike the single lagoon which cannot dispatch any power at all whenever the level of the water inside the lagoon is the same as the level of sea outside the lagoon. If the UK is to have a new Tidal Lagoon Authority then its head or commissioner or Tidal Tsar should not be Hendry because he has failed to conclude that the single lagoon design is not appropriate even for a pathfinder or first, smaller demonstration tidal lagoon project. That conclusion at least is dangerously misleading. It is therefore disappointing for me to read in your reply on behalf of the UK BEIS Minister mentioning the Hendry Review as if that matters when really it shouldn t matter, at all.

Autumn conference round-up: What did the main parties say about the green economy?

"Swansea tidal lagoon" I wrote in the following terms to the UK & Welsh Governments on 18th September 2017. (Read their replies - https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/2017/01/16/double-tidal-lagoon-baseload-scheme/ ) "CAUTION TIDAL LAGOON SCHEMES I caution the authorities to delay before final approval of funding and construction of these tidal lagoon schemes so that the plans proposed inferior single lagoon design can be upgraded to the superior double lagoon design, as explained in the following quote from my Scottish Scientist blog post I would hate any delay to put these projects in jeopardy and I d rather see the less-than-optimal single lagoon design built than lose this project altogether. I m a friend of these tidal lagoon projects but as a friend, I think a bit of tough love is needed so as to insist on the better double lagoon option. Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme I propose a renewable energy scheme where a tidal lagoon is partitioned into a high lagoon and a low lagoon by a dividing wall, which houses turbines which continuously generate power as sea water flows from the high lagoon to the low lagoon. Operation At high tide, the sea-gates of the high lagoon are opened and the high lagoon is filled up to high tide level. When the ebb tide begins, the sea-gates of the high lagoon are closed and remain closed until the next high tide. At low tide, the sea-gates of the low lagoon are opened and the low lagoon is emptied to low tide level. When the flood tide begins, the sea-gates of the low lagoon are closed and remain closed until the next low tide. The sea-gates are functionally identical to one-way flap valves and may be engineered as such. Baseload The Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme delivers a genuine baseload generation capability which can t be delivered by inferior single tidal lagoon schemes as proposed by Tidal Lagoon PLC, as explained in the critical review in Energy Matters, Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon and Baseload Tidal Generation in the UK .

Nissan to pilot microgrid trials in 2018

I admire their forward thinking and for realising the need for a coherent storage plan but why are we so hung up on chemical batteries for storage? As someone who has a chemical battery storage system, albeit a small scale 12v system, I know the inherent problem of any chemical battery which is the number of times you can cycle them up and down. Batteries do not last forever and eventually we will face the challenge of what to do with all the dead ones. I''m also not totally convinced on using a battery purposed for transportation as part of a grid scale storage system. I''d not be overly impressed if I found my car had a flat battery in the morning because the wind wasn''t blowing overnight.

Sky to ban single-use plastics by 2020

Sky to ban single-use plastics by 2020

it would be great if it was possible to repost these articles on facebook or twitter...

Does the UK's net zero future need the EU ETS? - The Evora Blog

Remember that , at the start of this century, the U.K. ran its own emissions trading scheme which helped prompt formation of the EU: ETS.

DONG's name switch highlights renewable energy transition

I think it''s a good move. To be honest, I never realised that DONG was an acronym for Danish Oil and Natural Gas. All I knew that that it was an energy supplier. A name change gives the company a great opportunity to tell its story and its vision for the future. It''s also an opportunity to educate people and create a conversation around how to type its name without special characters. Go for it. Good luck!

From climate science to global goals: How Tetra Pak is realigning its sustainability strategy

Are the cartons made more recyclable now ?

BT sets 87% carbon reduction target to help meet Paris Agreement goals

If BT would encourage its customers to switch off their home and business hubs when their internet connection is not in use, this would dramatically increase the savings overall. Whilst each individual hub contributes only a small amount to energy demand, involving multiple millions in the switch off would produce valuable savings in carbon. Time for all hub suppliers to agree and promote the switch off when hubs are not in use. I have been operating a switch off system at home and in the office for several years with no technical problems at all.

DONG's name switch highlights renewable energy transition

I think they are unwise - they''re not a consumer brand, and those who know what DONG stood for will recognise and appreciate their strategic transformation. There are lots of other companies out there whose name (initials or acronym) reflects heritage and origins, rather than current focus - ASDA isn''t really Associated Dairies, WPP most certainly no longer deals in Wire and Plastic Products... Yes, @TrevorSmith, Dong may also have slang connotations, but that''s not new, and I have difficulty typing rsted on any keyboard apart from my office PC.

30-minute masterclass: How to embed the SDGs in your sustainability strategy

Hi there, no problem at all. If you register for the event now, a link will be emailed to you after the Masterclass has taken place so you can watch it on demand. many thanks.

30-minute masterclass: How to embed the SDGs in your sustainability strategy

Unfortunately, I will not be able to participate in the masterclass. Will it be possible to receive a video of the proceedings after the event?

DONG's name switch highlights renewable energy transition

``to signify its `strategic transformation` and divestment of its upstream oil and gas business`` ... yeah, that`s why ... http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=dong

Pret A Manger's head of sustainability questions MP's coffee cup inquiry

I wonder if we looked at what was in an average household waste bin at the end of a week if that was 20kg, of waste, how many paper cups would be in it, maybe 10g!!! Think MP''s need to wake up and smell the waste, we need a coordinated recycling scheme across the country, allowing us to educate end users on a national basis, not town by town.

Seven things you probably didn't know about the UK's regional carbon emissions

Item 2, what is this peculiar arithmetic??? Richard Phillips

The Body Shop takeover could mark 'major turning point' in corporate sustainability movement

Great! Finally I will buy again Body Shop products, but will wait until they commit to no animal testing!

How the English Tea Shop's shared value approach has coupled ethics with profits

Congratulations, amazing business model and realization! The commitment of Mr. Herath is not just the key driving force for their win-win CSV, though it is inevitable. As he expresses: it is not an option but a must. I will buy only from you now on. All the best, great wishes! Fatima Homor MBA CSR strategist, academician

How the English Tea Shop's shared value approach has coupled ethics with profits

Congratulations, amazing business model and realization! The commitment of Mr. Herath is not just the key driving force for their win-win CSV, though it is inevitable. As he expresses: it is not an option but a must. I will buy only from you now on. All the best, great wishes! Fatima Homor MBA CSR strategist, academician

Low-carbon power records all-time high share of UK electricity mix

The UK beating UK records is no big deal. Britain ought to be beating world records as we transition to a 100% renewable energy economy. Setting targets is insufficient without the estimated 100s of billions of investment required and that''s where government, properly advised by scientists, can help. Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/ * Wind, storage and back-up system designer * Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme * Off-Shore Electricity from Wind, Solar and Hydrogen Power * World s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? * Modelling of wind and pumped-storage power * Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020 * South America GREAT for Renewable Energy

EasyJet says it could be flying electric planes within a decade

Interesting but the elephant in the room is still "where does all the electricity come from the charge the batteries?" with the 500lb gorilla being "what happens to all the batteries when they need replacing?" Perhaps this might encourage airports to build solar plants on the aprons and the roofs of all the terminal buildings.

Is this the most sustainable ship in the world?

@Rupert - you have a point in the "gratuitous consumption" bit but given our entire economy is based on consumption it is a little unfair to single out one particular industry. And like any pig if you utilise the whole thing and minimise wastage surely that is a good thing. As they say the only thing about a pig you can''t eat is the squeal. One of the biggest impacts the cruise ship industry can have is putting some of their profits back into the local communities they visit by building clean, reliable power networks that allow the cruise ship to run off mains power when tied up instead of belching out thousands of tonnes of noxious fumes. And by using local people for guided tours and other onshore activities instead of their own people. Too many times the only thing a cruise passenger buys is a coffee in town so what benefit the local economy really.

Dyson to invest £2bn in EV rollout

Nice clean roads then.

Anesco unveils UK's first subsidy-free farm

Whilst I salute them for doing this without a subsidy I do still have to ask why a field and not the vast acres of rooftops across our country?

Pret A Manger's head of sustainability questions MP's coffee cup inquiry

The goverment is being distracted from the real problem, a coordinated recycling scheme across the country, to enable manufacturers to put clear instructions on the packaging as how best to recycle it. I.e wash this out and put in purple bin. Paper cups probably make up less than .001% of landfill, they are a issue, but not the total issue. Mp''s need to wake up and smell the waste

Top carmakers must make 'rapid changes' or face billions in emissions fines

Audi, BMW, Lexus, Mercedes & Volvo are marketing (in leading Asian newspaper) the sale diesel-turbo engine models in Asia. They''re the tip of the global diesel engine iceberg. European limitations on emissions only moving/increasing problems elsewhere in a shared global environment.

EY: Corporate purpose crucial in uncertain global economy

As a professor of business ethics, I am so glad to see these results. Stakeholder management is winning over shareholder focus. I am happy to see that.

How employee engagement drives energy efficiency for leading corporates

Empowering employees to think and act like owners, driving and participating in the profitable growth of the company, is a proven way to drive results and engagement. Industry leaders like Southwest Airlines, Capital One and BHP Billiton and hundreds of private companies treat their employees like trusted business partners, enabling them to make more money for their company and themselves. They consistently see both profits and engagement soar. This Forbes article provides more background: http://www.forbes.com/sites/fotschcase/2016/05/31/engage-your-employees-in-making-money/

Admiring the view - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Update on this post - our Chimney Sheep is brilliant. Not only does it stop the central heat disappearing up the chimney it has totally eradicated the cold draught coming down. If you have an open chimney get one of these "beasties". Also we have bitten the bullet so to speak and started to upgrade our loft insulation. I found a section of the loft had almost no insulation so this is the first section to get the treatment but due to the number of pipes and cables it is not going to be easy. Overall though the house is very well insulated and despite having to keep the central heating on all summer (yes we never turned it off so no arguments about when to turn it on again) we haven''t had to burn too much oil.

EY: Corporate purpose crucial in uncertain global economy

As a professor of business ethics, I am so glad to see these results. Stakeholder management is winning over shareholder focus. I am happy to see that.

Lib Dems propose 'carbon-free' Britain by 2050

i believe that the Lib Dems have got this dead to rights, there is too much sloping shoulders and continue as we have a few more years yet. Excellent example of this the Advanced Propulsion Centre UK has a Technology Developers Accelerator Program they have just released those projects accepted to the first wave of funding. Out of 11 projects 5 are engines which would mainly use petrol, that begs the question "Why is Government funding being used to continue to invest in petrol engines when the Government has stated that there will not be any New petrol engined vehicle sales after 2040". Is there a loophole which will allow Petrol to continue because if not why are these people not developing Hydrogen engines and On board fuel production systems? There is the Eco 1 Hydrogen Rotary Engine in Scotland, there is my HyPulJet.2.0 a concept Hydrogen Hybrid Rotary Engine-generator and I am in talks with a team in Belgium which have had success with H2 ICE prototypes and are finalising there adapted 2000 cc ex-diesel engine. It is clear that there are options and I would not be surprised it there are not many more. The problem is that the people making the decisions on funding are not prepared to accept the need to change to Zero emissions. Should stop the step change small cuts in emissions from petrol engines, it is only a matter of time, where as spending the same amount of energy and money on hydrogen will lead to the future . The Lib Dems are absolutely correct, there is a total lack of direction from the top and they are being manipulated by the industry. The reality is that the China Auto Industry is scrapping petrol and going electric, decision made, Just Do it

How the English Tea Shop's shared value approach has coupled ethics with profits

I applaud the shared value approach, often referred to as Open-Book Management. Empowering employees to think and act like owners, driving and participating in the profitable growth of the company, is a proven way to drive profits and engagement. Industry leaders like Southwest Airlines, Capital One and BHP Billiton and hundreds of private companies treat their employees like trusted business partners, enabling them to make more money for their company and themselves. They consistently see both profits and engagement soar. This Forbes article provides more background: http://www.forbes.com/sites/fotschcase/2016/05/31/engage-your-employees-in-making-money/

Why Reporting 3.0 could mend the

Our economic model is indeed broken. I think though that change needs to start at the top. E.g. IMF''s web page gives it''s aims as purely economic ones. If their aim was to change the economic system to serve human wellbeing, I think that would be a start. And by human wellbeing, I mean serving our needs, which have been marvellously described by Maslow. This means food, water, clean air, shelter for all and environmental protection so we can secure these basic things for our entire lifetimes.

What does the future hold for sustainable manufacturing - The EEF blog

MPs to relaunch inquiry on plastic bottles and coffee cups

MP''s are allowing themselves to be distracted, the issue is creating a coordinated recycling scheme across the country, so that we can put clear instructions on the packaging as to what to do with it, I.e when you have finished with this packaging wash out and put in blue bin. This is not currently possible, as recycling schemes Chang from town to town. MP''s need to wake up and smell the waste, no good looking at individual items till they have created a way of recycling it.

Selfridges' yellow shopping bags to be made from coffee cups

Hi William, The disposable cups will be upcycled into paper that will then be converted into the yellow shopping bags, with the final product containing 20% cup fibre, meaning one large bag will contain the equivalent of one 8oz cup. The remaining fibre will continue to be PEFC certified. Hope that helps. Thanks, George

Selfridges' yellow shopping bags to be made from coffee cups

What percentage of the bag will be made of fibres from paper cups? Thank you.

Green dreams: 10 inspirational climate change quotes

Would it not be fair to say that five of the second set of sayings are not really relevent in this debate. Sayings 2,5,6,7,9 and 10 don''t, in my opinion, when taken in the context of the speech from which they were taken refer to climate change

United Utilities fined ?666,000 for polluting river with raw sewage

Where does the money from this fine go?

Britain flouting duty to protect citizens from toxic air pollution - UN

Can there be some honesty with regards to Air quality in respect to transport exhaust emissions. Whilst the Governments have ignored the EU regulations and the UK Law which the passed which enshrined those rules and for that they should be held to account in the European Court before Brexit allows them to hide. Does anyone have faith in these lying politicians to enact laws to be more stringent than those which they chose to ignore for whatever reasons. But lets not overlook the Auto Industry and the cosey relationship with governments and also the control and forceful influence of the Fossil Fuel industry. It is a damning indictment on all these groups of people, that they are spending many millions on Auto pilot EVs and all the intelligent people developing petrol engines which are extremely well engineered to cut a small amount of emissions. We have EVs which the Auto makers and OLEV, Low-carbon vehicles etc have come up with,,,,,,,"Zero emissions capable". This is applied to the new London eTaxi and it has a petrol engine generator as a range extender. So if the batteries are re charged from RE generated electricity it will complete about 35 to 40 miles with Zero emissions in use. The rest of the day perhaps 200 miles could be powered by the petrol engine. I must be missing something here, there is a working hydrogen Rotary engine prototype and a concept for a Hydrogen hybrid Rotary Engine-generator. These offer Zero emissions, yes they might not be viable, but in the event that at this point in time they offer a start point toward low-cost Zero emissions Hydrogen EVs. Again am I the only one who can see that a zero emissions engine will be manufactured on the same production lines which produce 60 - 70 million units 2016. This would reduce the need for, 600 or so Giga Factories and the means to extract and produce millions of tonnes of Lithium etc and monumental infrastructure improvements in all trillions in costs. Clearly there will be a small amount of costs to pass down to the consumer by searching out and developing a hydrogen engine generator. Low cost Zero emissions EVs are an essential if there is to be mass roll out in order to clean up the Air which people breath. The Government are not solely to blame, there is a complete failure by Auto makers and Research departments at Universities along with funding agency Innovate UK to take on board the fact that to overcome the causes of Global Warming it is rather stupid to ignore funding Hydrogen concepts, whilst awarding 3.5 million to Daimler to ADAPT KERS from F1 to diesel coaches to cut 17% emissions (at 50% funding) I would say to all these funding people running Funding competitions, you can get all the super business plans, but you will not paper over CO2 emission, by ignoring Hydrogen concepts which do not meet criteria simply misses the chance to see if something is viable. High time that people saw through the smoke screen, If the Auto Makers do not want to even look at the details of a Hydrogen engine and Research people do not want to consider attempting to develop a engine concept which does have potential then are these people stifling and delaying such projects because there is conflict with petrol engines they are developing. I say again it is not just the Government but they must realise that there are very intelligent people in the Auto Industry and at Universities and these people cannot move vehicles from Fossil Fuels to Hydrogen. Seriously misled just the same as Diesel Gate.

British American Tobacco added to Dow Jones Sustainability Index as familiar brands lead the way

How can the world s largest independent Coca-Cola bottler by net sales achieve the highest score on the Health and Nutrition? I don''t know the details, but something just seems wrong. Even their CEO seems a little unsure when he is quoted as saying "Our listing on the DJSI confirms that we are heading in the right direction". Incidentally, the first paragraph is probably wrong, as the company in question is Coca-Cola European Bottlers, and not Coca-Cola itself. I''m also not sure quite how a large tobacco company (BAT) can genuinely be seen as sustainable.

Green Investment Group makes first investment under Macquarie ownership to support EfW plant

Sadly waste incineration is a block to recycling. About 25 years ago Hampshire replaced all its incinerators but did introduce a lot recycling facilities as part of the mix. However I recently browsed the recycling table and saw that Hampshire cities and towns languished at the bottom.

British American Tobacco added to Dow Jones Sustainability Index as familiar brands lead the way

BAT .... killing us softly!

Sustainability sewn in: M&S launches low-impact jeans

Wanted to buy a couple of pairs for my son.... Hard to find - nothing to distinguish them from the rest apart from word ''Selvedge'' - I assume these are all ''low impact''? I have a feeling this will go the same way as M&S fair trade t-shirts - a short lived gimick with inadqequate marketing, quietly withdrawn....

New long-range Nissan LEAF sparks calls for UK infrastructure upgrades

David, I can see hydrogen having uses for large vehicles such as ships and heavy goods vehicles (although there are electric trucks starting to appear), but there is no way that hydrogen will usurp electric for small passenger vehicles. The advantages of electric are convenience (every dwelling has an electricity supply) whereas in the future having to drive to a forecourt to fill your car will seem like an anachronism. V2G also means that load balancing to the grid becomes applicable, as excess power from your car battery can be transferred to your Tesla Powerwall or straight to the grid. I realise that not everyone can access a charger if they live in an apartment for example, but that is more of a policy matter between local governments and residents associations. Secondly, battery prices dropped 40% last year, and energy density is increasing. This will only continue. Soon (in say 3 years) there will be no rational argument against battery EV''s, as the range and price point will be there. Hydrogen production makes hydrogen powered EV''s much less efficient than battery EV''s. A Scientific American article back in 2006 stated, "The entire process of electrolysis, transportation, pumping and fuel-cell conversion would leave only about 20 to 25 percent of the original zero-carbon electricity to drive the motor." But in an EV or plug-in hybrid, "the process of electricity transmission, charging an onboard battery and discharging the battery would leave 75 to 80 percent of the original electricity to drive the motor." So the hydrogen car is more like one third as efficient as the EV". It''s also high cost, and the infrastructure isn''t there. a hydrogen pipeline system from central station renewable generation and onsite renewable generation and electrolysis?--?are wildly implausible for many decades to come, if ever.

What does the future hold for sustainable manufacturing - The EEF blog

You have written a very good blog, it is very knowledgeable. Same issues in our state on business of Slitter Rewinder Machine

World set to exhaust carbon budget in 2040s, despite predicted energy plateau

The prescription that "energy demand will peak in 2025 before plateauing in 2030" is a recipe for absolute catastrophe. Urgent reduction is needed.

New long-range Nissan LEAF sparks calls for UK infrastructure upgrades

I think all future plans for EV charging points should also include hydrogen charging points for hydrogen-electric vehicles which are available now and can be refueled as fast as a petrol or diesel vehicle, but there are few hydrogen charging points in the UK unlike in Germany where there is a growing infrastructure. Battery powered EVs have a limited future due to the time to charge them and the considerable cost of the batteries which have a limited life; they will probably be replaced by hydrogen-electric vehicles over time.

Businesses must adapt sustainable finance models to prepare for innovation flood, says Interserve

Great article Tim. Regards. Bob Crawford

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Adam, unfortunately as soon as one costs it out, it all starts to unravel https://innovateuk.blog.gov.uk/2017/07/24/the-faraday-challenge-part-of-the-industrial-strategy-challenge-fund/#comments

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Adam - I agree that overtime we must stop wasting hydrocarbons by simply burning them, they are too valuable resource to squander. Gerry - yes we need to decarbonise freight traffic too rather than just concentrating on personal transportation. There have been moves in this department such as the new Post Office Electric Van et al. I grew up in the days of your morning pint being delivered on an electric milk float so I see no reason for urban goods not to be moved around in the same way. Alvin - I am intrigued by your Hydrogen Hybrid Rotary Engine concept and the idea of "onboard Hydrogen generation". How does this work and what is the feedstock for the hydrogen generation? For me the problem with Hydrogen is the fact it leaks, the pressure vessel to carry it is extremely heavy and it is difficult to produce (well my experience of lab grade H2 Generators suggests this). Burning H2 will still potentially produce NOx in the same way burning hydrocarbons does but if you can produce enough H2 to use in an efficient Fuel Cell then I don''t see any reason why not. One further thought about EVs - modern cars have a lot of electrical gadgets that we have all come to take for granted. The power for all this is provided by the ICE through the alternator. In an EV the power for all these gizmos has to come from the battery pack meaning a larger, heavier battery. How does this affect the performance of the battery? Or is this balanced by taking the weight of the engine and fuel tank away?

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

To me the path of travel is quite clear. The ultimate aim is that fossil fueled vehicles will be phased out. Nothing you have said can be argued with, it is clear that currently our grid is not fit to deal with the increase in electric vehicle usage aligned with the desired uptake. To position this in the context of a case against electric vehicles however is incorrect and that is where it does seem like a ploy by the oil industry to stall or slow the inevitable by providing facts that whilst are true are one part of the picture and one of the many challenges that we are planning to overcome. The switch to electric vehicles is one small part in the goal to decarbonise transport in the long term, this has to be supported by all of the initiatives you have mentioned. Short term, yes it does somewhat shift the problem but the major benefit of this is that we will start to see the huge urban concentrations of poisonous fumes start to dissipate and substantially improve air quality and public health in those centres. Everyone working in this area are considering all technologies, this works on a spectrum from fuel cell and autonomous vehicles to pushing for better Nitrous Oxide traps on diesel vehicles and more efficient petrol vehicles. I work for a transport authority and we are not against personal vehicles as every mode has its place, most certainly within a social context but we must also push initiatives that provide health, environmental and economical benefits, providing a truly sustainable transport network, fit for the ever growing future requirements. Also the aim of vehicle to grid technology will be to ensure that it would serve the needs of both the vehicle user and the grid. It is likely as with demand response and the use of UPS batteries, the demand will only skim capacity of batteries at specified times.

M&S first major retailer to source RSPCA Assured fresh milk

There is no such thing as cruelty free dairy milk for human consumption. The cows will only continue to give milk if they have calves. The male calves are taken away for slaughter after birth, and to make the cow continue producing milk it is continuously re-impreganted to keep having more calves, and the cycle of slaughter is continued. The female cow is worn out after five years and is then slaughtered itself. There is no such thing as cruelty-free dairy milk, despite the RSPCA''s best efforts.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Keiron Your blog does make lots of interesting points, particularly getting people [and business] to stop wasting energy. And indeed to use all resources in a sensible and affordable way. In a recent article by Andrew Warren [energy in buildings July 2017] produces information that the UK has reduced it''s energy consumption by 16.2% in 10 years starting in 2005. The core data comes from Government Collated and published figures [December 2016]. Compare the actual with the published forecast growth of 15% for the same 10 years. In that same period GNP has risen every year. So it seems that all the various sticks and carrots towards improving energy efficiency has worked. So putting EV into the power demand forecast is not crucial part of the issue. The major Impact from forcing people to use EV''s is on the local energy infrastructure. How will it be funded, and how will the networks be installed? The UK local networks have been installed over the last 70 or more years, and nearly always were paid for by the property developers [or at least with a substantial capex contribution]. The funding of network investment due to EV requirements needs a major rethink. By the way, a huge volume of road and rail traffic will be powered by diesel long after the advent of EV cars

Scotland commits to diesel phase out and plastic bottle deposit return scheme

The energy for charging EV will come from wind power. Lots of that in Scotland Solar pv may also be used So force all charging points to be connected to renewable energy

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

There''s a couple of items I''d like to respond to, I will try to respond to all points as soon as possible I promise. I''m, in a way, delighted by the response this post has had so far. With luck it will help us come up with a proper, coherent policy rather than the slap dash, knee jerk, political BS that we have right now. Aldous - yes I am acutely aware of the impact we are having on the other species we share the planet with. Being a sailor I see all to often the impact of our wasteful ways on our seas and as a mountain biker I see the same (similar) impact of plastics in our hills and glens. I''m not sure about EVs playing a part in energy storage as that implies we are willing to allow the battery of our vehicle to be drained if the Grid requires it, would you like to get in the car in the morning and find a flat battery? I may be wrong in this matter but I think we need to have a proper Grid scale storage system before we rely on small batteries with a different role. Carl - actually not all liquid fuelled vehicles run on petrol or diesel some run on LPG, on Compressed Natural Gas and even pure Ethanol. I know Reading Busses have a fleet of CHG Hybrid busses so this is why I suggest perhaps alternative liquid fuels should also be considered as part of the mix. I hope that vehicle use habits will change with time and I do question why anyone in our major conurbations needs a 3 tonne 4x4 to drive a mile but for many people personal transport is an essential so I don''t see usage dropping significantly soon. I do agree that changes in the way we work in particular need to be addressed as it seems pointless to drive to an office to sit at a PC doing a job that could just as easily be done on your dining room table given a reliable high speed internet connection. To everyone that corrected my appalling maths and provided links I say a heartfelt thanks. I will read all the links and reply to each in turn as soon as I can. Please keep the discussion going

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Thanks Joe - I will certainly have a look at the full report but to me the summary lacks substance. A a good starting point would be to recognize the sheer UTILITY of a family-size, weatherproof transportation device available at the instant, exclusive, autonomous and discretionary use of the owner - rather than pretend people would regard its LOSS as anything other than a massive reduction in their quality-of-life After all we live and I hope we will continue to live in a democracy. All these aspirations need primary legislation to implement and if at the next election one party stands on a manifesto `we will take away your cars and foreign holidays` and the other party doesn''t it`s obvious what will happen

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Trevor, that''s brilliant. A very thorough study of the path to decarbonisation has been commissioned by the Centre for Alternative Technology and can be found via this URL: - http://zerocarbonbritain.com/en/ I recommend it.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Thanks for the comments below. Your point ref a disclaimer has been noted and flagged with tech. Best, Will

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Ok, so it looks like I should have done some of my own research! I now appreciate that this blog is not representative of edie as a whole. While Kieron makes a disclaimer about this being his personal musings, I think it could be useful for edie to make a public disclaimer on blog pages. Kieron, I''m a geologist as well (though lapsed for a long while now). Now my tuppence ha''penny''s worth: electric vehicles represent a fundamental shift in our transportation system, enabling many new technologies to be utilised, not to mention societal and behavioural change. It is a technology which will unlock autonomous vehicles, which will have a broad range of benefits around safety, efficiency and quality of life. Yes, initially we will still be using roughly the same amount of energy, just burning it in a different place, but we will be able to take much more control over those energy flows. Storage is a crucial part of an electricity grid supplied by renewable energy, and EVs potentially represent a significant player in this role. As a geologist you probably have a good appreciation of how rapidly we are altering the global environment, and how this is causing what some are calling the sixth mass (or great) extinctinction (http://time.com/3035872/sixth-great-extinction/) (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124095489104774). Using new technologies which give us the potential to reduce our rate of consumption of hydrocarbons is arguably an essential part of mitigating this effect as much as we are capable of.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I`d like to see someone publish a roadmap to decarbonisation worthy of the name: one that shows the direction of travel, the roads you take and the places you pass through en route to the destination The Stanford University study http://www.cell.com/joule/pdf/S2542-4351(17)30012-0.pdf was SO disappointing: as a roadmap it is about as much use as a land-based version of the sea chart (a featureless sheet of blue paper) in Lewis Carroll`s `Hunting of the Snark`: He had bought a large map representing the sea, Without the least vestige of land: And the crew were much pleased when they found it to be A map they could all understand. `What`s the good of Mercator`s North Poles and Equators, Tropics, Zones, and Meridian Lines?` So the Bellman would cry: and the crew would reply `They are merely conventional signs!` `Other maps are such shapes, with their islands and capes! But we''ve got our brave Captain to thank` (So the crew would protest) `that he''s bought us the best- A perfect and absolute blank!`

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

You are aware that non-electric vehicles are powered using petrol/diesel? EVs are an essential part of decarbonisation along with changes in mindset around how we live, I infer from your piece that there is an assumption that vehicle usage will continue as per today which is highly unlikely. The switch away from the combustion engine will need to be done in conjunction with greater investment in mass transit, public transport, changes in working practices, greater connectivity etc.

Scotland commits to diesel phase out and plastic bottle deposit return scheme

And where will the power come from to charge all theses EPVs??? Dreamland??? Richard Phillips

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Many thanks to everyone who has responded. My aim with my personal blog is to spark debate and discussion, to air my thoughts and to learn more from others about the entire Sustainable future (not just energy). It is my personal blog and my personal thoughts so please do not point finger at Edie or their staff. I am grateful for their support by allowing me to publish my personal thoughts and ideas. I''m not an engineer or a researcher merely a jobbing Geologist so please accept my apologies if my math is garbage as +/- 1 million years is usually close enough for my work. Where I have made a glaring error in the past and it has been pointed out I have gone back and edited my article. I will also apologise for any errors I may have made but again I humbly ask for my readers support by providing evidence of these errors so that I and others can learn from these mistakes. I''m only human and a geologist. I''ve never claimed to be an authority in this subject. Again my aim is to spark open and lively debate about various subjects. it seems that this article in particular has achieved that. I will read through all the responses in due course and follow up on any links shared. Many thanks again to all contributors Keiron

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Dear Mr Everard, Please see our previous comments. This is a user-generated blog in an open forum on edie. It has not been authored or edited by the edie team. However, the author is aware of the comments this piece is generating and may well respond to you directly on this forum. Best, Will Parsons Content director

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I''m sad that this poorly researched article has been published. It is propagating false information, and has wasted my time. I expect better from edie. With the rollout of electric vehicles there will be an increase in demand for electricity (of course). There is also likely be a corresponding drop in demand from oil. So perhaps the question is should we burn oil individually in cars, or centrally in power stations, where emissions can be better controlled?

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

*Reference Scenario tab

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I guess it all comes down to which set of assumptions you are working to; if you look at the > tab here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/599592/Annex-f-final-energy-demand.xls it shows TOTAL energy consumption for transport going from 56,586 in 2000 to a projected 55,540 by 2035. The contribution from electricity over the same 35 year time-span is 373 in 2000 rising to 1,662 in 2035, which is an impressive % rise over the period but still only 3% of the total. If the UK governments own projections assume 97% of energy for transport will still come from fossil fuels in 2035, maybe we don''t need those extra power stations after all (Units are - I think - TTOE)

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Hi Nikki, This is a user-generated blog and not authored by the edie editorial team. However, we have made the author aware that there are comments on this post that they may want to respond to. Many thanks, Will

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I''m really surprised Edie has published this. First, please refer to the National Grid''s recent statement rebutting arguments that we are going to need umpteen new power plants. Please look at their New Energy Futures publication. http://fes.nationalgrid.com/media/1264/ev-myth-buster-v032.pdf Second, it is completely wrong to say we are perilously close to running out of energy on the grid. There were fears a couple of years ago but demand management has moved on a lot since, as has our installed capacity. As the National Grid says, they have ''all the tools in the box'' necessary and the demand for baseload is ''outdated''. Please also note that we have almost 400 clean tech projects backed up, waiting for regulatory approval and FiTs. The government has imposed a quarterly cap which means that many of these projects won''t get commissioned till 2019 at the earliest. If we are serious about decarbonising, we have plenty of low cost options here. As the National Infrastructure Committee points out, moving towards a dynamic grid with dispersed generation will save us more than 8bn per year... Please look at how much we are continuing to subsidise oil, gas and coal. (See 2016 IMF report and more recent on tax breaks to industry in North Sea and through capacity payments.) https://www.newpower.info/2017/08/wind-generators-to-queue-until-second-quarter-of-2019-for-uncertain-feed-in-tariff-rate/ Yes, we used more gas in electricity generation last year because of our drop in coal, and it is correct that we are not fully analysing the life cycle of gas to account for all its greenhouse gas emissions. But this year is the first year that BEIS has built in any projections for batteries! - It''s incredible. The government has (as the National Grid state quite clearly) been harping on about big new major power plants rather than addressing the future. The last auction saw battery supply over-subscribed six times... Yes, walking, cycling and public transport are what we need for transport. But please don''t over-state the barriers to electrification. Nikki Jones

?1bn solar project set to power 800,000 UK homes

While solar power achieves many things it does not stop the waste of energy that needs to be cut. If the existing "poor" quality energy efficiency was dealt with, the energy savings would provide the reduction in household bills

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Trevor S. You have lost me, you connect hydrogen with Hydro back up on demand generation. You or anyone else can produce hydrogen in your front room safely admittedly that would be a low volume, such as my model Hydrogen sports car bought as a birthday present. Small 12 volt hydrolyser, feeds Hydrogen through a pipe into the car which passes through a change valve to a balloon. When full, turn the change valve to the pipe to the Fuel Cell and the model car speeds across the floor. So where is the problem with scaling this up to full sized cars and other vehicles. There has not been any problem in scaling the technology, the problem has been and remains that there are many people who simply do not even want to look at the detail of a Hydrogen engine which might just be such an answer. Take a look at Riversimple, they have seen that one half of the equation is to produce a vehicle which is the minimum weight possible, they have got rid of big heavy and costly batteries and replaced with super capacitors. This allows a very small Fuel Cell to be used to power the vehicle. Small Fuel Cell equals small amount of fuel for a decent range again lower weight. This thinking process would no doubt work well with a development in New Mexico where a Hydrogen on board the vehicle unit is being trialed in a FC EV. Trevor there has been some innovative improvement on different techniques and improved materials used as electrodes and electrolyte. One unit in Bulgaria is now running on 6 watts input with a reasonable output. I am also interested in another unit from Eire which produces 330 l/Kwh of HHO. So I think that your analogy of a Pumped Hydro system for Holland as being a failure and that hydrogen is a similar failure is simply devoid of knowledge of the innovation in the public domain. As stated there are very wealthy forces which do not want Hydrogen in this route to get to a wider audience. Also as stated the media give plenty of time to people in the pay of these people or with vested interests but there is very little exposure of innovation from the "man in the Garage". As an example Lord Nigel Lawson keeps appearing on BBC to cast doubts on Global Warming and resulting Climate Change. It is well known that he does not have a Science Degree of any nature. So why is he allowed Nationwide TV slots to make unfounded claims. Big Oil and Gas it appears can pull strings anywhere.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Hydrogen power is a bit like a proposal for a hydro-electric scheme in Holland we don t actually have any mountain lakes or for that matter, mountains so let s construct at great cost a huge array of elevated water tanks, so we can generate electricity from those Only problem is where does the power come to pump the water up (or make the hydrogen) in the first place?

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

A plea: TRY to understand the difference between kilowatts, megawatts etc. and kilowatt-hours, megawatt-hours if you don t, how can we expect politicians to? The World Oil article states BRITAIN will need to add 52 terawatt-hours of power capacity between now and 2040, or 16% of what s available now (16% of present generating capacity is CLEARLY not going to be 8 billion household s worth) According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_in_the_United_Kingdom Energy use in the United Kingdom stood at 2,249 TWh ... in 2014 ... Demand for electricity in 2014 was 34.42GW on average ... (301.7TWh over the year) coming from a total electricity generation of 335.0TWh And indeed 52 TWh is around 16% of that 335 TWh figure. Now if you want to translate that into generating POWER capacity, you need to know there are 8,760 hours in a non-leap year and 1,000 GWh = 1 TWh. 52,000 GWh 8,760 h = 5.9 GW averaged out over the whole year, which is a little short of two Hinkley Point C s worth The business case for building new generating capacity that only runs at night or when the wind stops blowing is piss-poor. The World Oil article s analysis that the industry will opt for the lowest possible capital cost generating capacity = OCGT seems about right to me

?1bn solar project set to power 800,000 UK homes

Two things [or more] Will this be more successful than smart meters? Will suppliers and installers actually be paid on time? Who will get the fits? Will tenants be able to choose power suppliers?

Keeping up with the customers - why CSR is no longer enough - The Carbon Smart blog

Interesting article Imogen, thanks. While I agree with it there are some aspects that should also be included - 1. CSR/Sustainability is enough (ref title) - as to be truly sustainable should include all three aspects of economic, environmental and social activities and impacts of an organisation, the very backbone of the existence of a company. 2. In keeping with transparency, balance and authenticity, both positive and negative aspects should be openly disclosed or else the organisation is in danger of creating a glossy one sided PR exercise. Regards, Eva

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Good article, thanks. It is certainly a good idea to encourage debate on these important issues, but the WorldOil article isn''t a very helpful starting point. Its reference to "52 Terrawatt-hours of power capacity between now and 2040" is nonsensical as power capacity is measured in Watts, or Terrawatts, ie a rate of generation, rather than watt-hours which is a fixed quantity of energy. That statistic is meaningless. If they mean 52 Terrawatt hours per day or per year, that at least makes sense but which is it? Per day would require 2,166 GW of generation; per year would need 5.9GW which is no big deal at all. 16% of our current generation capacity could indeed, as you suggest, be found by making efficiency savings. If an internal combustion engine is, say, 25% efficient at converting the energy in petrol to motive power, then an Open-Cycle Gas station at 33% is a major improvement. Whilst a portion of the country''s EVs are taking on power, the others, already almost fully charged, will be providing ''balancing services'' to keep the grid in balance. I believe EVs are a big part of the solution to the UK''s future power vulnerabilities rather than a problem increasing them, and I''m not alone. I love the idea of your lightweight one/two-seat commuter vehicles a la Messerschmidt and Trojan. Come on you automotive engineers out there; get to it!

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Good article, thanks. It is certainly a good idea to encourage debate on these important issues, but the WorldOil article isn''t a very helpful starting point. Its reference to "52 Terrawatt-hours of power capacity between now and 2040" is nonsensical as power capacity is measured in Watts, or Terrawatts, ie a rate of generation, rather than watt-hours which is a fixed quantity of energy. That statistic is meaningless. If they mean 52 Terrawatt hours per day or per year, that at least makes sense but which is it? Per day would require 2,166 GW of generation; per year would need 5.9GW which is no big deal at all. 16% of our current generation capacity could indeed, as you suggest, be found by making efficiency savings. If an internal combustion engine is, say, 25% efficient at converting the energy in petrol to motive power, then an Open-Cycle Gas station at 33% is a major improvement. Whilst a portion of the country''s EVs are taking on power, the others, already almost fully charged, will be providing ''balancing services'' to keep the grid in balance. I believe EVs are a big part of the solution to the UK''s future power vulnerabilities rather than a problem increasing them, and I''m not alone. I love the idea of your lightweight one/two-seat commuter vehicles a la Messerschmidt and Trojan. Come on you automotive engineers out there; get to it!

£1bn solar project set to power 800,000 UK homes

Why does a project like this need foreign investment when the UK has a Green Investment Bank specifically for this type of thing? Targeting solar energy in the North East and North West where the intensity of solar radiation is relatively low will be far less effective than improved insulation. Low income housing often relies on electric heating systems! Another billion of tax payers money spent by HMG chasing targets and headlines rather than engaging strategic planning.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Intersting that neither Kieron, nor those replying so far, have mentioned either the fact that the UK''s Energy use has been falling in recent years, &/or this HMG''s considerable cuts (since 2015''s election) to public investment in insulation.

?1bn solar project set to power 800,000 UK homes

Thanks for & further to this stimulating piece on HMG action ref getting solar power for some of the UK''s poorest households, albeit that the really important point is in the last paragraph (& we have to remember that this HMG is the same one that''s been heavily cutting HMG support to home insulation & related measures) i.e. your articles last para is as follows: Households are responsible for an estimated 20% of the UK s total climate emissions. Unless this is addressed, the UK is likely to fall short of its climate change targets by as much as 30% by 2025, according to research released at the weekend by WWF. That report warned that it will take more than a century to fully decarbonise the existing UK housing stock at current home insulation rates.

?1bn solar project set to power 800,000 UK homes

Thanks for & further to this stimulating piece on HMG action ref getting solar power for some of the UK''s poorest households, albeit that the really important point is in the last paragraph (& we have to remember that this HMG is the same one that''s been heavily cutting HMG support to home insulation & related measures) i.e. your articles last para is as follows: Households are responsible for an estimated 20% of the UK s total climate emissions. Unless this is addressed, the UK is likely to fall short of its climate change targets by as much as 30% by 2025, according to research released at the weekend by WWF. That report warned that it will take more than a century to fully decarbonise the existing UK housing stock at current home insulation rates.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Hi Again, There is a National Grid Myth Buster article which challenges these kind of figures 52 Tw I think that was a reference to the Global or the US needs. N. Grid Spokesperson said that there will be a need for an extra 5 Gw and then slips in the there will need to be flexibility in the Grid and that will be Gas fired Generation. Given the waste in the Grid that is just a little better than petrol engines. In a one sentence the NG person slipped in that "it would then be necessary to consider Trucks, trains and other heavy vehicles. By my reckoning those vehicle will be about 75 % of the need for extra generation . My guestimate would be that the grid will need to add in the region of 20 Gw of generation. As some person with qualification said some time back, somewhere around 4.9 new power stations and storage That does not take into account new house builds etc. Globally it is monumental, however it is also worth noting that there are countries without E or G grid, is it right that for a second time these people are left in the dark. My earlier comment would most certainly be usable for these people and countries

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Keiron, I like the question, it is high time that someone such as yourself started a list or a search on such as edie.net for innovators to post their new ideas. A go to place for investors or people and Politicians to see what is available and what has potential. For instance. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles have been an sale for 18 months why are the companies and advocates of the approach still been awarded 23 million when there has not been one private sale of a H2 FCEV in the UK. WHY? Because they cost over 50,000 not because there are few H2 fuel stations. There has been several other funding awards to Fuel Cell companies and yet the approach has not moved any further than 2012. Before we go any further I think that it would be a good idea to also assess the hurdles which Battery EVs will have to overcome in order that they will be manufactured at a rate of about 50 million per year over a period of 20 years or so. Lets take a recent publicity, New Fuel Cell mass assembly plant in Chins at full production it will produce 10,000 per year. If they are looking at FCs taking 25% of EV market even if there are 100 such factories that is 1 million units per year which will take 250 years to meet that 250 million units target. Even battery Giga Factories will need to be several hundred and it will need hundreds of millions of tonnes of Lithium. There will be a question mark over Cobalt production.???? I would suggest that there is a known answer, at present engine plants provide engines for existing vehicles 2016 that was over 50 million sales(I think it was 65 million world wide) I make the point that this industry already has the capacity to meet the dire needs of the Planet. Research and develop a Zero emissions Hydrogen engine. They might start with my concept for a Hydrogen Hybrid Rotary Engine-generator or indeed a competitor the Eco 1 Hydrogen Rotary Engine, Scotland. My point being that there have been these two engine crying out for funding and development, Kenneth R Taylor since 2013 myself since 2015 with this latest version. Both innovators of these engines intend to have Hydrogen production On board the EV. YES you read that correctly,in my case I intend it to be "On demand, that is Hydrogen production will be geared to meet the needs of the running engine, which will run at a constant speed to generate electricity. Again in my case it is not simply a Hydrogen combustion engine but I term it a hybrid because it has a second internal phase to be more efficient and low fuel usage. On Demand On Board fuel production, ""It cannot work, that would be over unity"" say the many people in the industry and places of development. They are stuck with the one way of doing things. There is a innovative system on trial in a Fuel Cell vehicle in New Mexico. It produces 99.999% hydrogen for low input and high output. The people who say No, have not made themselves aware of innovators around the world. In the case of Cars I have copies of Patent documents where the US Auto makers were deeply involved with On Board Hydrogen decades ago. It becomes clear that the Oil and Gas industry have blocked or caused this direction of development not to get anywhere near funding. I would add to that it is well known, that any innovation which challenges the Status Quo will have many hoops to get through and even then funding will prove beyond reach. To conclude my point, a Zero emission Hydrogen Engine is only a matter of "We can do that Attitude" and likewise development of On Demand On Board Hydrogen production needs the same focused attention. There are several options on Linked IN Emil in Bulgaria, Robert Hudson in Australia and more. The Truth may be a bit hard to swallow, these innovative people are ignored, whilst 3.5 million was awarded to Daimler for instance to adapt KERS from F1 to diesel coaches to save 17% emissions, as an individual innovator disenfranchised by rules geared to Large Multi nationals to fund step changes. More Corporate Welfare to cover the costs of R&D and not funding real inventive innovation. At long last there is someone in Government who has forces Hydrogen to the top of the agenda 50 billion to convert the Gas Grid to Hydrogen. However there is no need for large infrastructure, there could be a small unit in your garage or on a balcony of a flat to produce hydrogen either from excess in the Grid or RE electricity, already in use in Japan. Use as gas or to generate electricity when needed, (move to lower voltage electricity circuits.) The reality is that vast majority of people are totally oblivious to where and what provide energy or indeed what fuels the car and where it comes from. Politicians appoint experts from the existing systems providers and clearly they are in most instances not geared to Out the Box thinking. The fuel has been available for over 150 years quite simply it was not what the Oil industry wanted, Still applies. Engines concepts are there to be developed but there is a need for H2 Fuel Hydrogen production units and systems are advanced way beyond what the Politicians are being informed. Lastly, the publications like this are not paying attentions and publicising new innovation.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Diversity of fuel is as important as diversity of thoughts and ideas. It''s easy to get billions, trillions, and tera''s mixed up at this level but it''s unlikely that all that transport energy could ever be all-electric. Hinkley C operating 24/7/52 is a large part of the energy required but averages and peaks will be the biggest risks just as they are in today''s low capacity margin world. De-carbonisation is the key thing in the ''big picture'' and the life-cycle assessment of both the machine and the energy source must be factored-in to enable an honest assessment. We also need to consider that many people do not live in cities, travel as part of their work, cannot share rides/need to carry ''stuff'', and make as necessary a contribution as ''desk-drivers''. We need them on the roads as a much as we need unnecessary journeys reduced. The industry is designing and building the tools - where are the government energy strategy and energy-efficiency measures we need to free-up and make available the energy sources that a future global UK needs? Only government can drive such major changes with coherent policy and action that makes investors confident to proceed.

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Hi Keiron, where have you been.... this is why Autonomous Vehicles are so important. Shared use will at least halve the number of vehicles. With clever scheduling that''ll be down to a third of current vehicles numbers. Nick

Electric Vehicles?? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

some good points, rather spoilt by your laughably incorrect assertion that "52 Terawatt-hours is the electricity demand of 8 billion homes"

Pentland Firth tidal project sets record-breaking month for electricity generation

Congratulations to the MeyGen team for another record, continuing to show the there is a future in tidal stream. Looking forward to all the future records to be set in the next 20 years. The team at AECOM are looking forward to continuing our 5 years of engineering, environmental and project management support to future phases of MeyGen and as Atlantis move to new markets and adjacent sectors.

'Paradigm shift' to electric vehicles required to meet global climate targets

Electric vehicles might be a paradigm shift but if they are it is minor. Major paradigm shifts are essential to address a changing climate. In terms of transportation a major paradigm shift could be more and better public transportation. Less mobility, more community action and problem solving, less use of resources across the board. This means a broad economic paradigm shift which I suspect our culture/civilization won''t undertake. As a result I hope, but am skeptical we will successfully address the changing climate of the planet.

Chemical footprinting 'moves to the mainstream' for big businesses

The missing piece to all these programs (ZDHC is beginning to try) is the pollution footprint component of the chemical footprint. Although, "safer" chemicals may be used, when released to the environment, these "safer" chemicals are still hazardous.

UK home insulations could take more than century at current rate, warns WWF

It is all well and good saying "we must improve the insulation in homes" but when you can not physically get at the spaces in the roof/between walls/under floors etc to install, revitalise or boost existing insulation then it is not possible or practicable. I have several sloping roof sections for instance that, when built, were fitted with the {then} standard 100m of rockwool insulation. This is now nearly 20 years old but to replace it would mean tearing off the plasterboard, replacing the insulation, rebuilding the plasterboard, plastering and painting. Or removing the roofing tiles and doing it that way. Either way it is not practicable nor cost effective. Can I get a grant or subsidy to improve the insulation in my home? No because I''m not on benefits and I''m self employed. How much would it cost to give every household in UK a one off energy efficiency grant of a couple of grand? or a voucher for 10 rolls of loft insulation? or 10 LED lightbulbs? Probably less than we think

ABB to deliver battery storage system for Burbo Bank windfarm

And where does the other 88MW come from when wind speeds in Morecombe Bay are below the minimum generation threshold for all these wind turbines? Which is about 10mph winds if any one is interested. If storage is to work then it has to be meaningful. 2MW for a 90MW {peak} capacity is a joke and will be used up in a few minutes of normal nationwide demand. Batteries are not going to be the storage solution in anything other than small scale domestic or village applications. We need to develop large GW storage options to properly smooth out the vagaries of renewable generation and to provide a power buffer of several days demand or we will see the lights go out.

Pentland Firth tidal project sets record-breaking month for electricity generation

Fantastic news and something we should be celebrating. This country has some of the highest tidal ranges and fastest tidal streams on the planet and we should be harnessing them all around the country. Tidal is clean, reliable and consistent plus as it is at least 20m below the sea surface pretty much out of sight and out of mind. Now let''s use a similar technology to harness the vast volumes of water flowing down our major rivers every single day and stop defacing the countryside with solar farms and wind turbines.

ABB to deliver battery storage system for Burbo Bank windfarm

I agree with Iain Whyte''s criticism. This relatively insignificant battery is not up to much. It''s like the wind farm sector feels an obligation to appear to be seeking solutions for the intermittent nature of wind power generation but can''t quite bring itself to face up to the enormity of what is really required in terms of required additional energy storage and / or back-up power generation in order to produce reliable power on demand, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year. Check this link for a design tool giving good 24/7/52 power on demand system configuration options for a 90MW wind farm. http://scottish.scienceontheweb.net/Wind%20power%20storage%20back-up%20calculator.htm?wind=90#wind Wind, storage and back-up system designer Peak demand, wind and back-up power / energy usage and storage capacity calculator For the specification and design of renewable energy electricity generation systems which successfully smooth intermittent wind generation to serve customer demand, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and 52 weeks a year. Adopting the recommendation derived from scientific computer modelling that the energy storage capacity be about 5 hours times the wind power capacity, the tables offer rows of previously successful modelled system configurations - row A, a configuration with no back-up power and rows B to G offering alternative ratios of wind power to back-up power. Columns consist of adjustable power and energy values in proportion to fixed multiplier factors. Replies, comments and questions about using the Wind, storage and back-up system designer at this link please. https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/wind-storage-and-back-up-system-designer

ABB to deliver battery storage system for Burbo Bank windfarm

2MW is only 66 x 30kW Tesla car battery packs which can only absorb just over 2% of peak power output from the generator array. Why is this special news - 66 x 30kW batteries would fit easily within my garage - so It''s not a major investment when seen against the cost of building the generators.

Consumers 'betrayed' over sustainability of world's biggest tuna fishery

No one needs to eat Tuna. If you dislike the MSC and fisheries approach to sustainability do your own thing and boycott Tuna. Simple

A greener footprint: How Timberland's boots ignited a decade of circular economy progress

Is there any information on how easy it is to disassemble/recycle the EarthKeeper boots at the end of their life?

World Water Week: 10 shocking facts about the global water crisis

Good article but why is there no mention of Cape Town in South Africa who are about to run out of water altogether?

Windfarm could boost Scottish economy by £827 million

Fantastic news about the Fife windfarm.the uk needs as many windfarms as it takes to keep the country runnin.,Lights burning,radios and tv s on and houses warm. Wind and hydro the answers, no nuclear please (far too risky and very difficult to clean up once its done) I hope the "old wrinklies and the RSPB don''t ruin the job prospects for the next generation millions spent on protecting birds,the money the RSPB case is costing is a scandal,it could build houses, roads etc. I live near a windfarm next to the sea and there seem to be more birds in that area than ever before even saw a fed kite flying next to one turbine. I visited this local windfarm, next to the sea, 2 weeks ago... One of the many visitors ..quote " This place was beautiful before they "polluted it with a windfarm". At the same moment her three dogs covered the grass and the formerly pristine beach, with their mess..and two of the dogs caught a young rabbit and killed it in front of some small kids.. Steve..

Windfarm could boost Scottish economy by ?827 million

Open Letter to the Scottish Government SUBJECT - "What the Scottish Government can do to progress the NnG Offshore Wind Farm" Minister for Business, Innovation and Energy for the Scottish Government Dear Mr Paul Wheelhouse MSP, I support the NnG Offshore Wind Farm Coalition. https://www.nngcoalition.com/ The Scottish Government could tell RSPB that if they do not end this legal action then the Scottish Government will reduce funding of Scottish National Heritage (SNH) with a view to impacting on SNH''s ability to combat some of the pressures on seabirds, including the control of predators, such as brown rats and American mink, along the Scottish coast and on islands. The Scottish Government ought to make RSPB face up to the consequences of insisting on further hated legal action which would definitely increase the propects of revenge cuts to SNH and much greater harm to the "world-leading breeding grounds" for sea-birds if there was an explosion in the numbers of predators such as brown rats and American mink. Scots are prepared to compromise but we are not prepared to have our economy ruined by bird-watchers. Ask RSPB - "Do you want to play hardball twitchers?" Yours anonymously, Scottish Scientist Independent Scientific Adviser for Scotland https://scottishscientist.wordpress.com/ * Wind, storage and back-up system designer * Double Tidal Lagoon Baseload Scheme * Off-Shore Electricity from Wind, Solar and Hydrogen Power * World s biggest-ever pumped-storage hydro-scheme, for Scotland? * Modelling of wind and pumped-storage power * Scotland Electricity Generation my plan for 2020 * South America GREAT for Renewable Energy

Ministers give double boost for low-carbon road transport and aviation

Words nearly fail me. I have a Hydrogen Hybrid Rotary Engine-generator concept which needs funding for development, initial modelling to see if it is viable and there is millions for buses which plug into the Grid or powered by Gas Both of which still have a Fossil Fuel input. There level of low-carbon is disputed in some circles, the grid is about 50% fossil fuels at anyone time and Gas is most certainly a Fossil Fuel and when leaks of methane are taken into account, the fact that methane is over 20 times worse than CO2 challenges the thinking behind Fracking and the use of Gas for major generation, still causing billions of Tonnes of CO2. There has to be funding for any innovative idea with a 50% chance of being viable. It has taken 3 years to get my H2 engine to assessment and even then it is vying for funding with petrol engines. Am I missing something here, the Government has stated that new petrol and diesel cars and vans will be banned from 2040 what is the point even in continuing development projects which cut 20% emissions. More important to accept that there is either BEVs or hydrogen FCs or Hydrogen engines, it follows to redirect that funding to clean energy engines. What these people need is a complete change of thinking, Fossil Fuels are ending time for a "We can do it attitude".

Audi designing solar roof for future electric vehicles

These car manufacturers should come to Brighton and see how the Big Lemon Bus company has already been using solar pv on roofs to power public buses replacing 60 petrol and diesel cars per trip Clive Bonny https://consult-smp.com/archive/2014/10/big-lemon-grows-bigger.html

Self-driving delivery truck tests to 'lower emissions and fuel costs'

This, like the internet, is the future, but also like the internet is subject to 1 great weakness - hacking! Can it really be made secure?

Scientists sketch roadmap for 139 countries to go 100% renewable by 2050

Scientists???????????????????????????????? Richard Phillips

Report: UK businesses have 'long way to go' to reduce emissions

Does anyone know when the Government will publish details of the single reporting framework mentioned in the final paragraph above?

IBM blockchain food safety programme attracts global firms

This could be used for Timber too.

New hydrogen technology could slash engine emissions by 80%

Secure Supplies , Leading 100 % Hydrogen Fueling of Combustion engines www.securesupplies.biz

Ford becomes latest car manufacturer to offer diesel scrappage scheme

I''d like to see more life cycle analysis (LCA) of the effects of accelerated scrappage schemes. I''d also like to know if anyone has done any feasibility work into upgrading the engines (and possibly drive trains) to meet Euro VI standards. Given the improvements to bodywork and other components on cars, it seems wasteful to scrap an entire vehicle just because one major component (the engine) may not be meeting current standards. When I upgrade my central heating boiler I don''t scrap the entire house! The cynic in me suspects that the private sector scrappage schemes are little more than an enhanced marketing campaign, targetting relatively affluent motorists (who can afford a new car) driving serviceable but relatively older cars.

Ford becomes latest car manufacturer to offer diesel scrappage scheme

Yet Ford have a tiny range of EV and Plug-in vehicles. How then are they contributing to clean air quality rather than merely selling cleaner vehicles that will further clutter our congested roads? Enquiring minds would like to know. And are the machines doing the scrapping `green`..? And what''s the recycling rate for those vehicles taken off the road? 15%? 25%? 80%? I''ve yet to see a vehicle scrappage scheme that delivers `zero to landfill` or `zero toxic waste`. Pardon my cynicism but this smacks of Ford bandwagon jumping and trying to influence the buying habits of (among others) VAG customers. Less `green` more `green-eyed monster`

Ford becomes latest car manufacturer to offer diesel scrappage scheme

The more I read about changing the Energy and Transport Sectors to clean energy the more I realise that relying on the people in charge of these industries are most certainly not the people to make that change happen in any reasonable timescale. For instance there is a complete conflict of interests, in all areas of Auto development. I have a hydrogen engine-generator-concept which may or may not work efficiently. It has taken several years of asking nicely to in recent months questioning the Public perception of Advanced Propulsion Centre to what they in reality are involved in delivering. As a result they introduced me/my concept to their Internal Combustion Spoke Bath University. I have now been forced to ask is there a conflict of interest here. Bath University is accepted as a place of excellence in internal combustion engines in the UK and perhaps globally. Not in question here. What I have to question is the fact that there are numerous development projects ongoing which has many millions involved in developing petrol engines to make cuts in CO2 emissions/increase performance. These projects are in collaboration and funded by awards from APC UK (APC UK run by industry even though Funded by Government and industry) and Industry such as McLaren. The question this raises is rather serious, "Is there conflict of interest here to cause those in charge to obfuscate/delay/stifle my hydrogen engine concept or other such concepts, which of course if they were proven to work would undermine all the projects involving petrol engines. To emphasize these issues, it is worth noting that Eco 1 Hydrogen Rotary Engine Generator was prototyped by The Highlands and Islands University in 2014 owned by Kenneth Taylor. Why has this engine and Mr Taylor not been supported and helped with further development. Is it because it has its own Hydrogen fuel supply and such improvements are clearly in conflict with the future intent of Fossil Fuels industries and Auto makers continued support for hydrocarbon fuels. I have had to come to the conclusion that if the UK and the rest of the World are going to move to clean energy then there has to be a New "Clean Energy Body/Ministry which is Completely separate from the Fossil Fuels and the bodies developing technology for existing Auto makers. I say "Clean Energy Body/Ministry" because there is a continual misconception creates that "Clean Energy" only applies to Transport, this could not be further from the truth. Coal, Gas, and Oil fired Power Stations are many times worse which relates to the carbon footprint of houses. The average UK family house causes approximately 5-6 Tonnes of CO2 per year whilst the family car cause approximately 1 Tonne of CO2. It is time that there is a joined up approach to the CO2 problem it needs to be addressed by a single body. This is a War on Carbon, where the potential outcome will make the events in World War II pale into insignificance so why is there not a War Ministry just like in any other War event.

New industrial air pollution ruling puts EU coal plants on 'life support'

This is a gazprom induced tacticto sell more russian gas. But coal is cheaper. And power plants are and will be as clean as regulations demand. This is includes mandatory CCS2. A Dutch environmental agency concluded that CO2 reduction is cheapest by making coal power plants climate neutral with CCS. And CCS2 is systematically cheaper, because it is not limited to the availability of old gas wells and pipelines. http://www.duurzamebrabanders.nl/blog/2017/02/regulations-are-essential-for-successful-energy-policies-wind-power/

Cost of Energy Review: will it deliver lower bills? - The ACE blog

The energy transition can and should make power cheaper, not more expensive. This is possible because todays power price is largely regulation and tax determined. Power users should not buy power, but genereate it them selves. Power users should buy generating capacity, a family size lot of a wind farm. And solar panels too, whichever has the lowest total cost of ownership, and power cost. This is the real paradigm shift, from buying power to generating it yourself. Because wind farms and solar panels work automatically, and renewable power is available for everyone, power users can own a generating capacity. Owning, so buying the capacity, gives the cheapest power, because no commercial margin is necessary, an no interest is leaking to investors or banks Fossil power is not bad, but CO2 pollution is. So not decarboninzing power, but prevent CO2 pollution. By mandatory CCS2. CCS2 is Best Available technology. http://www.duurzamebrabanders.nl/blog/2017/02/regulations-are-essential-for-successful-energy-policies-wind-power/ So, yes, reducing the amount of power a user has to buy, reduces the cost. Imagine a houshold can generate power for 2 tot 4 cent, for their own use. Then buying a heat pump f=driven by this cheap power, keeps the home warm much more cheaper than buying fuel. And electric cars will be cheaper to buy than ICE cars, and certainly be cheaper per mile travelled. So from 2019 on, a revolution will start, because who will buy a new and soon to be obsolete ICE car? By making CCS2 mandatory for all power plants, making them climate neutral, there is some time to build more wind farms. But there is already too much CO2 in the biosphere, to ignore that. So fossil power plants, with CCS2, need to be fed with biobased fuel, to make the power system of the world CO2 negative.

Hyundai pledges to build EV model with 500km range

@Andy - I don''t have a problem with biomass that uses waste wood or other waste biological products (such as sewage sludge) but I do have a problem with virgin forests being cut down just to make pellets to be transported across a sea in an oil fuelled cargo ship to be burnt to make electricity being called "clean, green or low carbon" as it plainly isn''t and isn''t sustainable. I agree the benefits of cleaner air in our towns and cities is a good thing but there are other ways to do this than simply switching all vehicles to electric, especially when the long term generation capacity isn''t in place yet. Even if we increase the renewable capacity there is still the variation in supply problem to deal with and has anyone figured out how many wind turbines it takes to generate the same power reliably that Hinkley C will produce (3.2GW)? Don''t get me wrong I want to see clean air as much as the next person but done sensibly and not for knee jerk political reasons.

Hyundai pledges to build EV model with 500km range

@Kerion Biomass in the grid represents 2.12 GW (at maximum capacity) out of a possible 40GW, which is a typical winter demand. Even if the biomass plants in the grid were running at full capacity, it would represent 5.3%. It''s a non-issue. (https://www.electricitymap.org/?lang=en&wind=false&solar=false&page=country&countryCode=GB) Yes there is still a carbon factor associated with EV vehicles but it''s reducing, there is no silver bullet solution. What about trade offs for improved air quality in cities and reducing the demand for fossil fuels as the renewable capacity improves?

Cost of Energy Review: will it deliver lower bills? - The ACE blog

The introduction of transport energy into the mix is a good strategy - it will be one of the major costs for ''hard working families'' in the near, medium, and long term. Unfortunately the political emphasis on the Big 6 and their ''extortionate'' profits masks the costs of taxes (conveniently), delivery, and waste through poor usage. Focusing energy on an all-electric future also seems less than well-thought-through. AD, and other means of cleaning up the gas grid makes its usage good for fuel diversity as well as easy conversion to heat, still our major need, and re-use of waste streams. Gas may also turn out to be good for transport uses - LNG-fuelled fuel cells may be better than batteries in the medium to long term, unless we have so much solar that it becomes the cheap solution. Insulating our buildings and getting ventilation systems working optimally for good IAQ and comfort in all seasons is the ultimate priority though. We need to be building decent homes with adequate space for families and home food production, in sufficient volumes that people will want to move from their cold and expensive-to-run older houses and apartments. Like the 60''s much that has been built in the past 20 years will be deemed unsuitable and require as much, if not more, improvement, and demolition, than the older, more spacious, homes. As in so many areas this government of ours has a long way to go before it has a strategy worthy of the name.

Uniting past and future: VW to create electric version of the iconic Microbus

I see that the distance for a single battery charge is now quoted in kilometres!!!!! I wonder how many will fall for that!!!! Richard Phillips

Hyundai pledges to build EV model with 500km range

Sorry but burning wood to generate electricity, especially when that wood has been shipped across the Atlantic by and oil powered cargo ship, is NOT clean nor low carbon. I''d even go as far as to say it isn''t even sustainable in the long term. I will give a thumbs up to Hyundai and other manufacturers for doing the work to improve range on their EV models. This will make a big difference on their appeal to the general motorist for whom being able to drive a couple of hundred miles at a time is important.

Plastic packaging: Are retailers ready to face the elephant in the room?

A certain online retailer could take note of item 3 as the number of times I''ve thought "did you really need to send that in a huge box?" when a small item has been delivered that could easily have been put in a "jfffy" bag (other padded envelopes may be available). Well done to SurfDome for taking this action and for sharing their experience for others to follow.

Every building must be 'net-zero' carbon by 2050, says WorldGBC

More construction firms need to explore new zero-carbon build designs like PassivPod if they are to meet their future legal obligations - Clive Bonny

Why a responsible business is a sustainable business - The Simply Sustainable blog

Thanks Nicola for raising this topic. From my own experience being independently assessed annually since 2012 against Responsible Business Standards as a small firm has helped me win business with large supply chains. It''s also saved me the admin and costs of ISO which are not cost-effective for small firms.

EU to enforce new energy efficiency rules for vacuum cleaners

Stop the link via the Grid to the burning of Fossil Fuels or better still DO NOT plug into the Grid, instead develop Hydrogen or other technology which does not cause emissions in use. STOP subsidising Fossil Fuels and fund Zero emissions concepts.

Scotland's largest solar farm given go-ahead

@ Neal - I lived in Aberdeen for 12 years so I am well aware of the weather in that corner of the country. Yes it gets more daylight in summer but that is not much use when it only gets 6hrs daylight in winter unless this "farm" was linked directly to a proper storage system (and I am not talking batteries). I happen to be a fan of solar but not for Grid scale generation without associated storage to deal with the night hours, bad weather hours, winter etc variations. I have solar panels on my boat to charge my 12v batteries so I know exactly how the system works and how even a small cloud drastically reduces the efficiency of the system (like a 95% drop in charge amperage). As @ Iain says Scotland is rich in sustainable alternatives from tidal stream to pumped storage hydro and traditional hydro. I can see the massive hydro scheme powering the aluminium smelter here in Fort William from where I type. I say develop more of this reliable, sustainable resource than waste taxpayers money on a scheme that is unsuitable for the latitude. If something is only viable due to subsidies then realistically is it financially viable? Should we as taxpayers be subsidising a company just to plant solar panels in a field? It is that that annoys me and not the actual development itself.

Scotland's largest solar farm given go-ahead

I agree with Keiron, a total waste of money and no doubt signed off by a muddle headed organisation who have little understanding of the true cost of solar electricity at this latitude. I suspect that overall the installation will be energy negative (took more to produce the cells than will ever be created) so how does that make sense. Scotland is rich in wave, wind and hydro - but not sun. Seems like gesture politics and greed for subsidies at work.

Scotland's largest solar farm given go-ahead

In response to Keiron, I grew up in this part of the world and, yes, while daylight is limited during the winter, the inverse of this is that there are long days through the summer months (if that''s what you can call them). Moray also has a pretty reliable micro-climate due to its position relative to the Cairngorms and you don''t tend to see much haar coming off the Moray Firth - to the east, off the North Sea, absolutely. Furthermore, it may look quite remote on the map from wherever you''re viewing it but there is a good density of population around the site. Speyside and its many distilleries is nearby, not to mention Elgin and RAF Lossiemouth. There may be more sun in the south of the country but does that mean we shouldn''t install renewables in the north? Absolutely not. All installed capacity will make a difference if it''s replacing fossil generation. I can only assume Elgin Energy have worked out that it IS financially viable. Try to be a bit more positive. :)

Scotland's largest solar farm given go-ahead

How much electricity will this actually produce? No not the peak but the actual, real world, when it is pouring down with rain or the haar rolls in capacity. Solar is of limited value this far north so I am truly sceptical it will be financially viable or even make any difference. In winter this area of Britain struggles to get 6hrs of daylight let alone sunlight. If we, as a country, want to install this kind of solar capacity then it has to be installed in the sunny, drier, SE corner where there are the people demanding the power and not stuck up in a remote corner of the North of Scotland.

Molson Coors aims to halve carbon intensity by 2025

As members of the Coors family fundraised for Trump, I would be more impressed if they spoke out in support of the Paris climate agreement....

EU to enforce new energy efficiency rules for vacuum cleaners

But how is "efficiency" defined? I will bet that it has nothing to do with the technical definitions that would spring to mind for the physicist! Tick boxes??? Richard Phillips

Hard Brexit a 'disaster scenario' for waste treatment capacity, warns Suez

Well, lets get building our own energy from waste plants then, which will provide jobs in uk. Lets spend the money required to manage our own waste and turn it into power. Marg

Post-Brexit Britain to offer circular economy for batteries with new recycling plant

Does this include lithium battery recycling?

First of many: DHL and Ford unveil new electric delivery van model

When will Ford sell these vans in the United States?

Cost of Energy Review: will it deliver lower bills? - The ACE blog

Yes the biggest way we can all reduce our energy bills is to not use as much or more accurately not waste as much. Simple acts like turning off lights, using a 30 C wash cycle, hanging laundry to dry instead of the tumble dryer etc mean we reduce our demand and our waste thus reducing the amount of power we need and therefore our cost.

Aldi rolls out natural refrigerants across UK stores to cut emissions

Great! This is right! We should put pressure on our MPs to force legislation in this area (and elsewhere concerning the environment). Keep it up Aldi and Sainsbury!

Black cab turns green as London taxi firm undergoes EV rebrand

The future of zero emissions vehicle is hydrogen power. There are already TfL buses running in London on hydrogen that have the same range as petrol or diesel vehicles, so why is this new LECV taxi a petrol/electric hybrid? It should be remembered that modern petrol engines produce almost as much NOx as a diesel because their combustion flame temperature is now almost that of diesel. There are just 7 hydrogen filling stations inside the M25, so why is the Mayor of London planning to install 1,500 more electric charging points in the capital? Clearly we need a mix of both.

Post-Brexit Britain to offer circular economy for batteries with new recycling plant

Totally agree with what Martin Chilcott said. I found it amazing that the UK had no battery recycling when you think of the population and the lifestyle

London's new Environment Strategy: Five key questions answered

You're absolutely right. There isn't one mention of hydrogen... there are five. See 'Will London ever be a car-free city?' in the above.

London's new Environment Strategy: Five key questions answered

Absolutely amazing, NOT one mention of hydrogen. Time to fund and develop hydrogen technologies and then invest in scale up. It is absolutely clear that all the plans to maintain status quo have had little effect over the past 25 years. Need to go for the only clean energy avail;able at present and make it low-cost affordable to all. Way out costly tech is not going to make it when incomes have been driven down. Why is it that the car is always the mode of transport to get rid of, I see those efficient buses with a 9 litre diesel running with NO passengers at all and mostly about 6 to 12 these routes should have hydrogen mini buses. The future is hydrogen powered drones so start planning for future and not modifying the past.

Clean energy stocks outpacing fossil fuel investments in Trump era, report finds

This is a business matter, totally unconcerned with the technical virtues or vices of an intermittent power supply from dilute naturally variable sources. As long as Governmental and private speculators throw money at "renewable" electricity, the "market place" will react. Greed and fear are the driving forces. Richard Phillips

Post-Brexit Britain to offer circular economy for batteries with new recycling plant

A

Rise of electric car solves little if driven by fossil fuels, warns windfarm boss

Where are you suggesting we generate the 52 terawatt hours of extra capacity that will be needed just to cope with demand from electric vehicle charging? And how do you propose building and installing enough offshore wind turbines? There isn''t the capacity in the "jackup" installation fleet to do this in a realistic timescale. Then there is the matter of service and maintenance for these offshore turbines which requires a fleet of service ship all running on Fuel Oil so you still have the fossil fuel input. Do you propose to fill the North Sea with turbines thereby denying the waters to recreational sailing and presenting problems to commercial shipping navigating this basin? Sorry to sound so negative but someone has to ask the questions

Post-Brexit Britain to offer circular economy for batteries with new recycling plant

Great news but what has this got to do with Brexit. This could have been set up even if we were staying in the EU. No? Cheap headline. Shame on you.

Reaping the benefits of the open water market - The Water.Retail blog

A key problem is lack of awareness of water saving devices by users and complacency by suppliers. Small UK firms like Akrovalve need to be recognised and rewarded by water authorities

Sustainable Business Covered podcast: In the green room with Landsec's Sarah Beattie

Why are interviews with leaders of industry with company policies and little if any outside of the box thinking. What is perhaps needed is to have an open forum where people with concepts which may well prove to be a disruptor can have an input if they wish. At some point those people making decisions will have to move away from picking and directing winners which produce a step change and decide on any concept/project which stands a chance of working. There will obviously be losers but there will also be the all important winners. Why decide against developing a Hydrogen Rotary Engine-generator because it might not work, when the attitude should and will HAVE to be lets push this until we prove that it will not work. There is still too much support in decision making bodies for Fossil Fuels and petrol engines are being funded ????????

UK waste policy: Burning away recycling ambitions or 'sleepwalking' to capacity crisis?

Very focused article - in a good way! These are the sorts of information summary / propositions that need to be included in any local or national campaign to ensure that we DON''T as a country sleepwalk into a situation we really do not need!! Same sort of thing re nuclear energy.... where we as a country give in to the supposed need for more electricity - without the hard work (as some would see it) of the effort to cut the need for the increased usage...... The argument must start with the bottom line..... make it cheaper as well as more effective..... EXAMPLES - plastic bag usage.... a brilliant example that is easy for the man on the street to understand!! - lets do it for throwaway coffee cups!!!

It's getting hot in here: how to create warmth without burning fossil fuels - The Carbon Smart blog

I''m not convinced Hydrogen will ever be viable. It costs more to produce in terms of energy in than it gives back, is difficult to store as it leaks, is highly explosive then there is the question of what you use as the base feedstock? I may be proved wrong but I''m not holding my breath. I''m curious though as to why Water Source Heat Pumps are not mentioned? We are an island, surrounded by warm water (particularly on the West Coast with the Gulf Stream), we have large rivers flowing through our cities that carry an enormous volume of heat through and away. Could this not be a massive source of heat for buildings, homes, industry? If Scottish Canals can heat one of their amenities buildings on the Caledonian Canal at Gairlochy with one of these machines (it gives out 4kw of heat for every 1kw of energy used) with no ill effects to the canal I see no reason why London couldn''t get a lot of heat from the Thames.

British Land completes major retail rooftop solar project

Big Thumbs Up to British Land for making use of the normally unused space above our heads. Taking the lead and showing other businesses what it actually means to be sustainable and source electricity from alternative means.

'Lack of political desire' biggest barrier to establishing UK bottle deposit scheme

Why does it need "political desire"? Retailers are warming to the idea, bottle manufacturers are so why can''t it be implemented by them without the need for politics? If Tesco, Morrisons, Asda et al had a bottle recycling machine in the entry way and gave you a voucher of your shopping based on how many bottles, cans you put in I''m pretty sure people would use it.

Carbon Trust chosen to lead Government's ?9.2m industrial innovation platform

9 million? For how many businesses is this initiative? 0,1% of the sector?

It's getting hot in here: how to create warmth without burning fossil fuels - The Carbon Smart blog

Hi Dave - we''ll leave Jack to come back to you direct - but if you keep an eye on edie over the next week or so you'll see the publication of the next in our 'edie Explains' series - dedicated to CHP. Best, edie editorial team

It's getting hot in here: how to create warmth without burning fossil fuels - The Carbon Smart blog

Can you say why you are not mention in combined heat and power? Power generation rejects more heat than is needed to heat all UK buildings and is a much more energy efficient means of low carbon heating than electric heat pumps. And the trilemma is a myth - combined heat and power district heating is cheaper, more secure, and less carbon than any other option, Best Wishes Dave Andrews