Archive Discussions archive on edie.net


Extinction Rebellion: Role of business in society is being defined by climate change

Farhana Yamin is loud in her voice on climate matters, but she has a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics, and further graduate qualifications in Law. As a lawyer she is well qualified. This does not qualify her to speak on the causes of climate change which lie entirely within the boundaries of Physics and Chemistry, and then in Engineering. I do not suppose that one in ten thousand of the protestors has any mastery of the complexity of climate science, or any idea that policy is driven strongly by business with only profit in mind. Richard Phillips

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

The tail of big business indeed! The interest in wind farms is not the generation of "green" electricity, but lucrative profit. Since the withdrawal of subsidies for new build wind turbines, none have been built; in spite of planning permission for hundreds being passed. Back in 1989, Mrs T terminated our leading nuclear industry. All nuclear work at Harwell was terminated at a weeks notice. Hundreds of professional scientists and chartered engineers were given early retirement. "If we need new reactors, the Market will provide them, no need for us to design them" Just so, Wylfa and Moorside take note. Richard Phillips

JLL 'on track' for 100% renewables target by 2020

2% reduction on its own footprint is hardly credible target. Simply buying REC''s doesn''t account for actual hard reductions within the operating envelope of any business or building. Great coat tail stories of its clients initiatives & ideas and publishing as their own.

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Richard That would pretty much go for anyone in parliament or position of legislative authority. The tail of big business wags the dog! Ben

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Just a little addendum. Re Claire Perry. She is a Geographer. We have never had a minister responsible for any energy related affairs with any graduate qualification in the physical sciences. Yet they still hold forth in their ignorance, and specifically refuse any offer of technical advice. For myself, former ARIC., FRIC., 35 years as a scientist at AERE Harwell, I do pretend to know just a little about it. We need saving from the green green amateurs! Richard Phillips

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

This is merely a reflection of demand, and the policy to give pride of place to unreliable, intermittent, expensive and land consuming renewables. The former grid met demand by bringing in generation in order of increasing costs, and reducing it in a similar fashion. It was all well under control. Without fossil fuel or nuclear power, the chaotic generation of renewables would be impossible to handle. As it is the costs of incorporating it in the grid is enormous, so embarrassingly so that National Grid will not divulge anything about the costs of subsidies or others unique to renewables (cabling, frequency, voltage and phase correction etc). The public is taken for a ride!! Both John and Ben are spot on. Richard Phillips

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

The Cumbrian mine is coking coal to replace imports, not for energy

UK breaks coal-free power generation record by huge margin

Still just point in time measurements of coal percentages., Even today bright sunshine outside but still the grid is supported by 3.8% with coal power. I still roll my eyes at these outlandish claims of coal free power.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

So A hydrogen fuel cell stack and associated systems costs around 13 times the price of an equivalent powered diesel engine. We have a long way to go before we will have an economic truck that runs on hydrogen fuel cell. Then there is the hydrogen storage issues and weight of the unit to consider against The legislation on the weight of a tractor unit or a rigid truck. Finally There is the issue of vibration and its affect on a fuel cell stack. Much still to do.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

So A hydrogen fuel cell stack and associated systems costs around 13 times the price of an equivalent powered diesel engine. We have a long way to go before we will have an economic truck that runs on hydrogen fuel cell. Then there is the hydrogen storage issues and weight of the unit to consider against The legislation on the weight of a tractor unit or a rigid truck. Finally There is the issue of vibration and its affect on a fuel cell stack. Much still to do.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

I don''t know about the efficacy, but there is a huge volume of waste such as plastics, and especially tyres, that are being produced and exist in millions of tonnes in waste dumps, as well floating in our waterways and oceans. This type of high temperature reduction is a good way of cleaning up this waste stream and making it safe, as well as removing existing pollution. Hydrogen has lots of potential and especially for heavy vehicles like trucks and trains, and, perhaps, shipping. Electrical power via batteries may well be the answer for lighter vehicles but hydrogen powered systems seems like a good option across all transport areas.

Plans to build UK's first plastic-to-hydrogen recycling plant unveiled

Big question is how much energy is this process actually going to take to produce the 1 tonne of Hydrogen? And how much "pollution" from the process? If it is net energy positive, ie more energy from the Hydrogen than it took to produce it, and there is minimal atmospheric pollution from the process then this could be a very valuable addition to the waste and energy system. But if it takes more energy (electricity) than you get back then cut out the middle man and just use the electricity direct. However I am all for new and innovative solutions to both our waste management problems and our desire for cleaner energy but they must be truly accounted and be truly clean

The trends transforming mobility's future - The McKinsey blog

A rather US-centric view, especially in the final section on shared mobility, which should be a whole lot more than just ridesharing. Improved connectivity around public transport, including more real time information on matters such as delays (already quite good for trains) and train seat (or bike rental) availability is likely to have a bigger impact on the future of mobility than "miniature holographic waiters".

Amazon to support three major new wind power projects

Just a couple of points ; "and deliver 1229MW of power to Amazon annually" MW is a measure of the RATE of delivery of power. It is analogous to the speed of a car; MWh is analogous to the distance covered. Unless the difference between MW and MWh is clearly understood by writers on energy matters, reporting will be confused and erroneous. I note that Senator Jerry Hill graduated in Law, not physics. Claims of the use of "green" energy can only be credible if the total use claimed by customers can be matched to the amount generated at the time of use. If the amount generated at any moment is less that that being generated, the balance is being filled by conventional generation. Richard Phillips

Renewable energy could meet 86% of global power demand by 2050, IRENA concludes

86% of electricity needs if transportation is electrified but what about if heating is included in that calculation? I could easily provide all my electricity needs for my house with a 2kw array on the roof but to heat the house and provide all my hot water with electricity? That''s 2 orders of magnitude more panels and a few hectares of land needed to replace the 3 cubic metres of heating oil I currently use annually. That''s the crunch issue for renewables. How do we heat our homes, business, schools, hospitals etc without burning things (gas, oil, biomass etc) and how do we do it without hammering the bills? Oil costs 5p per kwhr, gas 4p. My electricity tariff is 15p per kwhr so 3 times as much to heat my house and hot water if I electrify. That''s a big ouch in anyone''s wallet.

Government urged to focus on lifecycle emissions as part of net-zero target

No point in developing something just because it sounds "green" when the overall net impact might be huge. Biomass is a case in point. When you factor in the volume of fuel oil used to ship wood pellets across the Atlantic just to burn them in a power station it sounds "green" but add in the hundreds of cubic metres of oil and suddenly it''s not. A cubic meter of concrete is a tonne of CO2, do we factor that into the green credentials of wind turbines? Add in the CO2 released when you dig up peat moorland and it is even worse. Hydrogen sounds green as the resultant waste product is water and you can reuse that to make more but water vapour is even more potent as a greenhouse gas than CO2, so burning H2 in central heating systems might actually make things worse than burning CH4. Especially if to make the H2 you crack CH4. At the end of the day the equation has got to add up and result in as low an impact as reasonably practicable. Sometimes that may mean the low carbon option might actually be what we are doing right now but with a minor tweak to improve the efficiency.

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Richard Spot on, these think tanks amount to nothing more than w@$k tanks of business mans hopes and dreams. We need actual people of common sense and a robust time spent in electrical engineering industry to even comment on these initiatives or even grasp the concepts of energy systems. All I''ve seen is my companies power bills increase by 30% in the last 4 years but the whole sale price is falling. These taxes are going where I ask the Government ? Ben

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Absolutely right, Ben. All these schemes are devices to make money. They sound wonderful to the totally uninitiated. We have to remember that we have never had a Minister, with responsibility for energy, who has any career involving the essential physical sciences. A degree in classics or economics, does not tell the holder much about electricity generation. But politicians have to appear all knowledgeable, and businessmen must make money. The huge Li-ion battery at Swindon will be 50MW, 50MWh, one twentieth of a normal power station for one hour, cost ~ 25 million. Just scale it up! Renewable energy is so unreliable, and the ancillary systems to make it compatible with demand-lead generation, that the costs have to be hidden; just lumped into your bill, un-itemised. And we do not have a satisfactory explanation for the vaunted importance of CO2 on global warming. A lot of jumping, shouting and waving of flags by schoolchildren, who know it all, of course. O for sanity! Richard Phillips

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

Looks like another government pink elephant project. Id love to see the due diligent report into the viability of these claims. This is much like the Tesla battery in South Australia, can only run everyone''s TV for 30mins before going flat. Battery storage will need 2.5x the renewable generation and storage capacity to even come close to taking up the UK''s demand. Essentially a recouping revenue streams for the struggling energy generators as they want the power price to increase through the perceived energy crisis that the Green parties have created.

Virtual power plants and 'super hubs': Four smart UK energy systems projects launched by Claire Per

To be clever with the distribution of electricity, it has first to be generated, but Government policies are in total disarray. It then has to be distributed, a whole technology in itself. Only then can the talking shop chatter about virtual power plants (?) and "super hubs". From the article I have still have very idea of what, exactly, they are. And I have the impression that they are little more than paper giants. Nowhere can I find the cool hand of the experienced Chartered Electrical Engineer. Richard Phillips

Shrinking renewables sector dealt further blow with Renewables Obligation closure

We have the ability to generate 215kw / day from a micro generator, however there is zero incentive to buy this, we currently burn logs and oil. If anyone knows if there is a way to export this back to the grid and receive some payment then great let us know. Unfortunately there is zero incentive to invest in any form of green or renewable energy now!

Nestl? set to launch its first plastic-free packaging in 2019

Innovative Solution Systems (ISS) is the sole agency responsible for the promotion and distribution of waste-to-energy equipment (manufactured by Biomass Energy Systems Inc. (BESI) in the West African Sub-Region. The objective of ISS is to promote the use of waste to energy technology in Ghana and the entire West African Sub-Region to ensure energy sustainability and clean environmental. We are sincerely looking forward to assisting Ghanaian and Africans making sustainable environmental and economic changes to the current infrastructure. We have made great strides in providing similar support, providing solutions to waste and energy issues for our clients in Costa Rica and India. We know that our capabilities and responsible and practical approach will be ideal for what you are striving to achieve in Africa. BESI is a Woman Owned Business Enterprise, located outside of Chicago, Illinois. We are providing solutions to issues regarding waste management and alternative energy to a wide variety of stakeholders, as well as developing the supporting training and university curriculum. We have provided extensive support for the United States military, working towards zero- landfill bases, providing waste assessment, custom designed turnkey systems, and delivering significant performance data. We currently have two facilities owned by the USAir Force that are managed by BESI which support the US military research into materials conversion and baseload renewable energy at utility and battlefield scale. We have additional facilities operating and in construction at our India offices, which have tremendous environmental significance for their entire industrial base, cleanly converting wastes and producing steam for use onsite, reducing operating costs for local industries. This is an economically sustainable strategy for the entire region. BESI would endeavor to provide a similar strategic and beneficial approach to the areas of Ghana in which we work The patented gasification process used by BESI is the TURNW2E Advanced Gasification system. Gasification is the process by which a material undergoes exothermic and endothermic reactions within a vessel and harvests the gaseous material it emits- generally undertaken to provide energy. BESI s process is customized to client requirements and delivered as a turnkey solution for our clients. A turnkey system consists of the four-step process of preprocessing/shredding, gasification, gas cleanup, and gas utilization, with each unit integrated and optimized for maximum output. Using the BESI design and deliver approach, Africa factories and industrial concerns will be able to gasify much of their waste to produce the best value alternative energy output, which can include water desalination, air conditioning, cold storage, hot water, heat, steam, or electricity. A key differentiating feature of BESI s process is its flexibility. The system can be scaled from 5 TPD to 100 TPD, and can be designed to reliably operate at lower volumes, as needed, by the location requirements. Materials of different densities are readily accommodated, as the system can change and control reactions called shift-on-the-fly to maximize conversion efficiency. As a general rule of thumb, our systems can convert 100 TPD of 7000 btu/lb waste and convert it into 3 MW/h of energy. Modules of 100 TPD can be supplied to accommodate volumes over 500 TPD. Typical simple payback can range from one to seven years, depending upon the client requirements and economic strategy employed. The system does not emit any harmful emissions or particulates. Everything in our turnkey systems is engineered with environmental well-being in mind, as well as providing an economically sustainable solution to waste management and energy generation. BESI has successfully supported clients working on projects funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Currently, a project in Costa Rica is moving ahead, with the USAID providing pre-development funding to BESI s client. This project will have BESI deliver a complete design, turnkey system and installations and operations support for 100 TPD of wastes and an additional 40 TPD of tires. BESI will support your group as needed for similar efforts, with the expectation of tremendous success in Africa. https://spark.adobe.com/page/wV2rF6TNws1dx/?fbclid=IwAR1VZd40RFnIAsadgMnxserkXMOPeju1SuoamqzcUFwyGkBsVlrHfKgi6Ww

How are big oil and gas firms approaching the low-carbon transition?

Ian, the 45% came from an infographic produced by the API (American Petroleum Institute) a few years ago so could well be out of date but the fact that oil has many more uses than just burning is still true though regardless of the actual % Modern life relies on petrochemicals and petroleum based products. Yes some may be replaceable with biological alternatives at some point but not all. That isn''t going to change overnight so the oil industry will still be hunting for and developing new reserves of oil (and gas) for a long time and we will continue to do it in as environmental sensitive manner as we possibly can, which contrary to popular belief we do do.

Policy needed to solve the 'Rubik's cube' of energy storage

The energy has to be generated in the first place. Converting it to another form involves losses due to inevitable inefficiencies. Further losses are incurred in the reverse process. Energy has also to be deployed in driving the processes, as well as the overhead cost of the plant involved. It can all be made to sound wonderful to those without the scientific and technical understanding of the processes involved. And this circumstance is not unusual in the political and business sectors. Richard Philips

Tesco to trial plastic-to-oil innovation which makes all packaging 'recyclable'

Interesting technological response to the plastic problem. Turning currently un recycled waste back into the raw material to make new products is a step forward in the drive to reduce waste. Be very interesting to see how the trial goes and I hope consumers embrace the idea of bringing stuff back to the retailer rather than relying on kerbside collection.

Sustainable strategies: Learning from the (many) mistakes of Brexit - Matt Mace's blog

How appropriate, that''s probably the most important thing anyone has written about both Brexit & for that matter Sustainability/Sustainable Development Thank you very much & I hope you''re similarly sending it to not only No 10 & Parliament but also your fellow journalists

How are big oil and gas firms approaching the low-carbon transition?

Keiron, I don''t think that''s right. According to the US Government Agency, the EIA, in the USA in 2017 on average 47% was motor gasoline (includes ethanol), 20% was distillate fuel (heating oil and diesel fuel), and 8% was jet fuel. The balance was used for fuel oils for heating and electricity generation; asphalt and road oil; and feedstocks for making the chemicals, plastics, and synthetic materials. By my reckoning at least 75% is burned one way or another. See https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=41&t=6. In Europe we tweak the barrel to produce more middle distillate (diesel) and less petrol. The fraction that goes to chemicals may be a little higher in NW Europe (Rotterdam and Antwerp in particular), but globally I wouldn''t expect them to be much different from the US figures.

How are big oil and gas firms viewing the low-carbon transition?

What you have to remember is only 45% of a barrel of oil goes to fuel. The remainder goes to the petrochemical industry to make the millions of everyday products our modern life demands and needs. From pharmaceuticals to lipstick, plastic to synthetic clothing, medical equipment to mobile phones. Burning it may decrease but people like me will still be heading out into the worst Mother Nature can throw at us to find and develop the raw material all these things are made of for years to come.

Battery storage and solar farms to power 100 UK 'Electric Forecourts'

"industrial-scale solar farms and a 27MW battery storage facility" To quote the power which a facility can supply, without quoting its capacity, MWhours, is of little meaning. Can it supply power at 27MW for ten minutes or the hours????? Understand the units!!!!!! Richard Phillips

One hour, no power: Millions of kWh of energy to be saved as landmarks switch off for Earth Hour

Why not put a timer switch on all these lights so they automatically switch off at midnight? Does any building need to be floodlit all night? Offices should have systems to shut down lights and equipment outside of office hours or when there is no activity in the building. Automatic sensors can turn on "security" lighting when the guards make their rounds or if motion is detected. Billions of kwh are wasted every single minute of every single hour of every day of the year. A small change every minute builds up rather than some daft symbolic gesture that does nothing in the long term. As the ARP Wardens used to shout "Turn that bloody light off!"

In charts: The UK's record-breaking year for low-carbon energy generation

The same old TWhours. It is the hours that give it away, the bundled up parcel, not whether they were generated when they were needed. All renewable electricity is generated as and when nature chooses, NOT at all necessarily when we need it. And it is difficult and expensive to store on an industrial scale. Hydro storage is limited by our geography. Batteries will never be cheap enough to be really economic on an industrial scale, and they wear out. A multiplicity of mechanical devices are little more than expensive toys. Without gas turbine backup to the full extent of the deployed wind potential, turbines are NOT a secure energy supply. Indeed only last June the whole 20GW potential was reduced to less than 1GW for more than five days, over 120 hours!!! Gas turbines simply met demand. Wind turbines are not installed to generate electricity, they generate MONEY, at sea they still do, as they are built. On land, new turbines are not subsidised. In spite of a hundred and more approved planning applications, none have been built. In spite of claims of how cheaply they generate electricity; one might have thought with such generators there would be a rush to build and connect to the Grid???? I don''t think that Ms Pinchbeck has it quite correct. But correct technical evaluation must come from a technical background. This is not the case for all policy makers in administrative roles. And especially, perhaps, politicians. A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, specially to the country. Richard Phillips

Why General Mills want supply chains to become regenerative stewards of the environment

Sounds like a real wake up call for General Mills. Late but a wake up call none the less. Soil health regeneration will be a big task for predominately monoculture or arable operations though.

CCC calls for stamp duty and winter fuel payment reform to help decarbonise homes

Why not just make it easier for all households to (slowly but surely) replace fossil fuel based heating systems with cleaner, more efficient and ideally non fossil fuel systems. I have an A rated Oil Fired Condensing Boiler for my wet heating system, it is 2 years old but eventually I will have to replace it. But what with? I''m not going to install Underfloor Heating or a Ground Source Heat Pump as it is simply too expensive ( 18k plus for GSHP) and if I switch to an electric boiler (simplest) I will see my energy bills jump by a factor of 3 as electricity is 3x the price per kw-hr as oil or gas. All of a sudden I am energy poor despite thoroughly insulating my home (at my expense with no government assistance). What alternative systems are available to me? What grants or support are available? If we really want to decarbonise heating then affordable options MUST be available to all households not just those on benefits or the so called energy poor.

BNEF: Battery storage costs have 'plummeted' in past year

There is a widespread belief which this article fosters, that "green" technology is actually clean and therefore is in some way, more moral and deserving of uncritical support than coal, oil and gas. This is certainly the case with the (wonderful) lithium ion battery and its much hyped use, on a TWh scale, in grid storage. TWh-scale storage will certainly be needed if intermittent renewable energies are to contribute anything more than a very small fraction of the energy needed by the World''s burgeoning population. In fact, the cost of the lithium ion battery depends increasingly on the cost of the materials of which it is composed, as the costs of its manufacture in vast giga-factories heads toward an asymptote. At https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05752-3, you will read a carefully researched paper on the facts of life as regards the availability of the relatively scarce metals needed. In Deutsche Welle''s well researched documentary "The true cost of electric cars" (https://www.dw.com/en/the-true-cost-of-electric-cars/av-46457917 ), you will see a small fraction of the appalling damage to the environment already caused by mining lithium in the Atacama desert at only the start of global EV manufacturing. Furthermore, as you must know already, 50 years after the invention of the lithium ion battery, there is not a single, commercially viable process anywhere in the world, that can recycle these at the end of their relatively short lives, no matter which battery chemistry is used. By "commercial", I mean a process that can deliver the metals used in their manufacture as economically as freshly mined metals at the (usually Chinese) refinery where the mined metals are refined to the purity needed to make these incendiary batteries safe. I would welcome Edie''s corrections, if I am wrong! No! lithium ion batteries are not about to

'I certainly didn't do it for sales': Iceland boss sheds fresh light on palm oil phase-out

If you look at companies like Unilever, with its massive profits, it could easily use the old alternatives to #palmoil. But will not, because it puts profits before people and planet. The WWF, is at fault as well, as it knew about the problems in 2005, but continued to support a failed certification system. That is why, I no longer support the #wwf.

Tesco trials plastic-free fruit and veg selection

"The supermarket will survey shoppers to gauge reaction and food waste levels of each product will be monitored to see if packaging serves a purpose." Basically if it will increase Tesco''s handling costs and weather or not to increase the price of the food.

Nestlé backs P&G's closed-loop solution for plastics

Hello Daniel. I really do not think that either of the bodies will overrule a multitude of private companies whose raison d''etre is to operate at a profit. The changes essential to their present operating procedures will not be well received without something near to, if not quite, nationalisation. The present Administration is not well placed for such a traumatic move, having become used, for almost 30 years now, to having to put all such operations to open tender. It does not get my vote, I believe that such matters should function in the national interest; and this concept also covers gas, water and electricity. Richard Phillips

Nestl? backs P&G's closed-loop solution for plastics

what about FDA and EFSA?

Sharp rise in Arctic temperatures now inevitable, UN warns

Fear not dear Lady! H.L.Mencken "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed and hence clamorous to be led to safety by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." Well said HL Richard Phillips

European lawsuit on biomass rules threatens Drax plant

Add in the huge volume of fuel oil required to ship said wood from USA to Drax, the diesel used to move the lorries, the petrol used for the chainsaws and suddenly biomass is no longer green but very, very brown. And of course the government are talking about banning log burning stoves or open fires so how can they justify Drax burning wood or the Renewable Heat Incentive for pellet boilers?

Old Toyota manufacturing plant set to re-open as hydrogen 'hub'

The politicians and business interests really do like hydrogen!!! It has that air of scientific simplicity; and they don''t do complex science, or even much simple, come to that. But a little reality. Volume for volume, hydrogen contains only one third of the energy of methane. Thus the domestic central heating "boiler" will consume three times as much. Costs?????? Perhaps even more importantly, hydrogen does not occur naturally. It has to be manufactured. This process, by whatever route will never be able to yield a product which give more energy when used, than that which has been used to produce it. Methane is ready made for us, drill a hole in the ground. The ratio of energy used to obtain it is thousands of times less than that obtained from its use - a "low carbon" bargain. It is also awkward to handle, store, has very wide explosive limits and requires special materials of construction in its handling. But, yes, it burns very cleanly, and at a high temperature. Production is simple in principle, but not in practice. A process little heard of in political and business circles is the so-called iodine/sulphur process, of interest because it could be directly driven by the high temperature reactor; up to ~900oC. You don''t get owt for nowt!! Certainly not with hydrogen. Mention is made of the IPCC predictions of global temperatures later in the century. These mathematical models, and there are over 150 or so of them, all use an Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity (qv) of between 3 and 3.4. Detailed statistical examination of the values of this parameter over the last thirty years or so reveal that to fit reality it should be 1-1.5. This makes a huge difference to the forecasts of overwhelming disaster. But this is not good for business. Richard Phillips

Energy Catapult launches SME support for low carbon heating and cooling

The fundamental facts of this proposition are simply disregarded. To heat or cool any structure requires energy. this has to be generated, somehow, somewhere. If this energy generation is not to be principally from fossil fuel, it has to come from nuclear fission. The quantity and reliability of renewable sources places them in a minor position, always having to have their equivalent generation in reserve from dispatchable sources. It is also notable that our principal renewable, wind, requires subsidy, on everybody''s bill. Since subsidies were withdrawn from land based wind farms, not one single turbine has been installed. Cheap, profitable, hardly. It all means more reactors, but getting them built is a problem since Mrs T destroyed our indigenous industry. Unfortunately the politicians are technically ignorant, and resolutely resistant to any learning. Tough but true, just do the sums. Richard Phillips Storage o energy has no viable solution in prospect when industrial scale systems are to be considered.

England could run short of water within 25 years

Water authorities need to get their own house in order when they shout about water wastage, I have lost count of the number of burst water pipes that throw out gallons of water for periods of a week or longer with no urgency to repair. Does fining them really work, when all they do is put these costs onto consumers?

FedEx plans to deliver 'future of aviation' with biofuels drive

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WATCH: Michael Gove, Claire Perry and Paul Polman support school climate strikes

Dear Mr Scott Let me now address some of the points you make. On the point of the "single number". This pivotal number is the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity, expressed in Kelvin, ie, a temperature. It is the temperature rise to be expected from a doubling of the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. It is expressed as the ratio of the two logarithms of the respective concentrations, to the base 2. The IPCC selected the number 3 as its "favoured" value, back in 1980. It seems not to have had any rigorously derived basis; but I am open to correction. It is the value used in all 150 or so climate models derived under governmental auspices. And without exception, they all over-estimate the temperature rises. Examination of the most reliable data from satellite, weather balloons, and ocean data from Argo buoys, indicate a value for this number of 1-1.5. These have been detailed statistical analyses of data over different times and lengths of time. An expected rise of less than half that promoted is significant, especially as it applies to a doubling of the CO2 concentration; the impact of the CO2 increases thus become less severe as concentrations rise. I am not sufficiently knowledgeable on the bio- matters you mention, to pass any meaningful comment. Certainly in order to preserve and improve not only our standards of living but internationally, it is essential that we have available sufficient electrical power. This will have to come form nuclear or fossil sources if it is to be reliable and in sufficient amount, on demand. There is no renewable source which can supply industrial quantities of power, ON DEMAND. Renewables being variable, from full down, to zero, backup has to be available. This scenario was addressed by the French with 83% nuclear and other generators. You will note that since the subsidy was withdrawn from land-based wind turbine generation, not one turbine has been constructed, in spite of all planning permissions being in place. Not money, Huh? This generation is supposed to be so cheap. No problem with building heavily subsidised off-shore farms - "loads ''o money", and we have to buy ALL the power generated, needed or not. I agree that our present policies are heading for the rocks, but we have an administration which devoid of scientific awareness. May we have your provenance please? Richard Phillips

Sharp rise in Arctic temperatures now inevitable, UN warns

Something nice for our children and future generations to look forward to! #climatechange

Government launches major review on future of transport

The biggest thing that needs to be sorted is kerbside charging. If you live in an apartment, flat, shared house or any accommodation that does not have a dedicated parking space for your EV how do you charge it? Bloody long extension cable across the pavement?? Around town or city driving means no one needs 300 mile range. 100 would probably do which means more emphasis on small EVs rather than massive SUV and performance models. So consumers need to feel safe in a smaller car and encouraged to ditch the massive "Chelsea" tractors in town and cities. That could be as simple as making residential streets too narrow for them or have narrow contraflow lanes to allow small vehicles to "bypass" one way systems. If it takes you twice as long in your big car because you have to go round the houses but a small (single or twin seat vehicle) can nip down a dedicated lane and cut the corners you''ll soon think about downsizing. I''d go for a modern Messerschmitt style bubble car if I could zip round town and avoid the traffic. Then focus on all the other forms of low carbon or low energy transport. Improve the cycle infrastructure with dedicated lanes, separate from main traffic flows, secure weatherproof storage, changing and drying stations. Invest in mass transport, such as the trains and tube, so it is fit for the 21st century needs - Ditch HS2 and invest the billions better improving local networks. Encourage walking. Open up old disused railways as green lanes to link parts of towns and cities and create a pleasant walk to work or school away from the traffic. Use the canal/river side paths to do the same. Bring nature into the city, trees filter the air and convert CO2 to O2 remember. Ban idling full stop. Not just outside schools but everywhere. Taxi drivers are notorious for sitting at the rank waiting for a fare with their diesel engines running. Stop it now! But at the same time accept that for some people Electric transport is always going to be a difficult option. Remote areas may never have the charging infrastructure to make a 200 mile range viable so don''t dismiss liquid fuel hybrids completely

WATCH: Michael Gove, Claire Perry and Paul Polman support school climate strikes

Since you ask, Mr Scott: I am a retired research scientist, having spent the last 35 years of my professional career at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Oxfordshire. Since retirement I have continued to take a keen interest in all energy matters, and have a wide circle of very experienced contacts in all aspects of the industry. I have thus acquired a wide knowledge of the spectrum of energy matters from nuclear generation to renewables. I became, by examination, an Associate of the Royal Institute of Chemistry in 1954, and was elected a Fellow in 1971. Richard Phillips

WATCH: Michael Gove, Claire Perry and Paul Polman support school climate strikes

I wonder what your credentials, Richard Phillips, are for your dismissive comments. If you are suggesting the problem is overstated, and that it is all a con so that renewable energy businesses can make a lot of money, I would like to see your evidence for those statements. The idea that the whole Climate situation depends on a single number that is a guess strikes me as absurd. The evidence is wide ranging that we face an unprecedented situation ahead, involving not only Climate Change, but also Loss of Biodiversity, Soil Infertility, Desertification, Air quality, Plastic. Our excessive overuse of fossil fuels is at the root of the problem and a planned lessening of their use is necessary, to the point where as soon as possible we do not use them at all. If we do not do that, and quickly, we face the doom and disaster you mention. If instead we make the transition we will all be better off for it. We may not own as much ''stuff'' but our lives will have the potential to be much richer. The present economic system is ''The Age Of Stupid''. Peter Scott

Nestlé backs P&G's closed-loop solution for plastics

Interesting developments. I have always regarded the problem as near insoluble, having regard to the enormous complexity of the materials gathered as "plastic waste". The re-use of easily separable items, transparent drinks bottles, and the opaque milk-type containers would certainly be possible, and even practical at a primary level. Many products are however mixed products with specialised uses, is this problem soluble? A unified national approach would be needed, among a multitude of private operators, a great deal to ask! One solution is certainly to remove the obvious bottle component, and incinerate the rest, in specialised power generating plants. And the CO2 is less significant than the value "preferred" by the IPCC for the Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity would indicate. That value of 3-3.3 should be, and measurement shows it, nearer to 1-1.5 degrees. But there is no money in that!!!!! Richard Phillips

Asda removes 6,500 tonnes of plastic from own-brand packaging

Proof that where there is the will there is a way. Asda, along with other supermarkets, should be congratulated for their actions but there is still a long way to go to reduce the massive amount of waste in our shopping baskets. Not just packaging, which is bad enough, but wasted food as well.

Spring Statement: What can the green economy expect from Philip Hammond's announcement?

Why do we continue to allow new builds without PV and or solar thermal installed? Yes, it adds to the sale price, but its a lot cheaper than after build.

Spring Statement: Chancellor unveils biodiversity plans and low-carbon homes requirements

...and what about emissions embodied by practical completion of about 50% of ''whole life'' (see reports by NHBC, RICS, UKGBC and Committee on Climate Change) but occurring in the short term when the savings must be made. Incentives are required so that most of the 300,000 ''new dwellings'' Government say are need every year will have to be created as sub-divisions of under-occupied houses so that the space being occupied is heated and insulated.

European lawsuit on biomass rules threatens Drax plant

I have a domestic biomass boiler running on wood pellets. My payments are based on an assessment made of the needs of a house like mine. I use only the minimum of fuel needed for comfort. However, there are biomass systems classed as commercial that are paid according to the amount of fuel burned. As a result, some people are burning wood just for the sake of gaining higher payments when they don''t actually need the heat! This is extremely wasteful of resources and should be stopped.

Ikea creates blockchain solution to "democratise" renewable energy

The disposal of high level nuclear waste was resoled well over 40 years ago at AERE Harwell. It involves vitrification and containment in stainless steel vessels which are stored in underground facilities. It all decays in 700 years. The problems lie with public and political perception, not with the job itself. Richard Phillips

Honda to only sell electric vehicles in Europe by 2025

It''s surprising that there''s no mention of Hydrogen fueled electric vehicles (FCEVs) at the Geneva show, considering that they are available in Germany where there are now over 50 hydrogen filling stations in operation. The UK has about 10 hydrogen filling stations, mainly in London. A hydrogen FCEV can be refilled just as quickly as petrol or diesel, and its power density per kilo is much higher than a battery, so they will replace EV''s over the next 10 years. Maybe the British reporter didn''t think FCEVs were worth mentioning? Either way, the electric power to charge an EV or to hydrolyse water to hydrogen still needs to come from a fossil-free source.

Government urged to rethink road taxation policy to spur EV uptake

Road charging, with differential rates for vehicle type, is probably the only long-term solution. The Government is going to need to find a way of replacing vehicle fuel duty, but without taxing domestic electricity supplies at a greatly increased rate. Initially rates should favour EVs or other low emission vehicles (eg. H2 fuel cells), but as petrol and diesel use declines, road charges for all vehicles will have to rise. Of course, this will be fought tooth and nail by the civil libertarians, as whether transponder or GPS technology is used, Governments will "know" where a vehicle was at any time (although not who was in it, of course). There will also be issues about common standards when crossing international borders, and the need to make systems tamper and hack-proof. But it''s the only realistic solution that I can see in the long term. In the very long term, it may be possible to link vehicle use to personal carbon allowances, but I do find that rather more "Big Brother"-ish than relatively simple schemes for road charging.

Report: Airlines warned of investment losses over lack of climate action

Please note this report comes from the Grantham Institute, financed by Jeremy Grantham, who used his New York-based asset management company to support the results of the recent IPPR report that claimed climate change was causing a huge increase in extreme weather events. This was subsequently found to be based on extremely poor data, and "2005" really should have been "1950". Personally, I would regard all pronouncements from the Grantham Institute as less than reliable, and certainly not scientifically objective.

Government urged to rethink road taxation policy to spur EV uptake

What would convince this motorist to purchase an EV as a first choice (when I come to replace my current petrol vehicle) is not the tax regime, as let''s be honest the government will find some way to screw every penny out of us they can, but things like the price of the EV, the actual real world range, the comfort, style, features of the vehicles themselves. I didn''t buy my current car for its tax status. I bought it because I liked it, it is comfortable, cruises happily on the motorway at 70 (ish), gets 450 miles to a tank and I can throw 2 mountain bikes or 2 inflatable kayaks in the back. Show me a mid sized, family hatchback EV that can do that and I''d consider it. Talking to a local taxi driver who runs an EV fleet (Nissan Leafs and a Tesla) he was saying that even his newest Leaf can only just get to Crianlarich and back from Fort William on a full charge, if he turns the heated seats off and it isn''t raining. The Tesla can get to Glasgow Airport and back but even he admits it''s an expensive vehicle to run as a taxi, nice but expensive. Whilst no one "needs" 450 mile range you do realistically need to have 3hrs at motorway cruising speeds so 240 miles, ideally on 70% of charge which equates to 343 miles on a full charge. I say 70% as that is the 80% fast charge less a 10% reserve. If you can find a charger and it can top you back to 80% in 15 mins at a services then it isn''t much different from stopping, having a comfort break then filling the car up with liquid fuel (apart from the fact I only need to do that every other stop). Forget worrying about road taxes, vehicle taxes and other stuff and concentrate on building the charge infrastructure for all and making EVs that people want and can afford. Not everyone can pay 30,000 plus for a basic EV (which of course has 20% VAT on it so taxed again.)

3M pledges to source 100% renewable electricity

I believe that I would correct when I understand that "100% renewable" means really that the total MWh consumed are charged as renewable, without, necessarily, being generated from renewable sources, at the moment of usage. I am, of course, open to correction. Richard Phillips

Corporates yet to take responsibility for role in the plastics crisis, report warns

Businesses are run by people and they are the ones refusing to act because it appears easier to do nothing or be lazy about consequences. The same problem applies to energy efficiency and water waste. Politicians are people too - and they are the ones we must now rely upon to legislate. We have had decades of this and we do not have decades left to prevaricate. Do not impose a ban, simply require proper collection and processing costs to be built in to purchase price. Business will find the cheapest way - they just need rules to follow. When schoolchildren are telling adults to please do something, you know you have a problem, or should do.....

Corporates yet to take responsibility for role in the plastics crisis, report warns

Walking along a street or a beach one can''t help but notice all the corporate branded waste strewn everywhere and it is easy to blame the companies but while they should and must make more efforts to reduce or remove waste the buck has to stop with the consumer, end of story. It is the consumer who wants take out coffee, who wants cheap take out food, in cheap, easy to use single use materials. It is then the lazy consumer who then can''t be arsed to find a bin and who just throws it out of the car window or drops it in the street. Perhaps big companies could sponsor bins and bin collection in their neighbourhoods as well as encouraging reuse through discounts and loyalty schemes. Maybe they could fund and organise large scale litter pick ups. Perhaps we will stop dropping litter. Perhaps I''ll wake up

We need to put jobs and poverty at the centre of climate action - The Jeremy Leggett blog

As a community organisation lead who has spent over a year planning a small scale community energy project I fully agree. All I want the community to see is generating our own energy will allow us to set the price of that energy for at least 21 years. The Local Authority are not seeing the benefit to the schools. More local energy models are needed so the benefits of community owned initiatives that create jobs can create those jobs along with lower energy charges in every village / town. A place based approach benefits all its residents.

MPs debate climate after school strike - but only a handful turn up

Quite separately, Kieron is absolutely correct in his point: "What is needed is a cross party, non politically motivated panel of MPs, Scientists, Economists and other experts in various fields to sit round a big (recycled) table and thrash out a sensible, realistic plan for the next 50 years not the next 5." It is not as if such persons are not available, but business lobbyists are to avoided like the plague. Richard Phillips

MPs debate climate after school strike - but only a handful turn up

I note that Ms Moran stands out as the sole MP who has graduate qualifications in the Physical Sciences. In spite of Chairing the Env Audit Committee, Ms Creagh is a graduate in European Studies and languages. Ms Lucas holds both a degree and doctorate in English Literature. Mr Goldsmith holds no graduate titles. But the subject under discussion is pivotal upon an understanding of the science behind any change in global temperature, and its putative influence upon a lasting (for generations), trend in a changing world climate pattern. These are complex scientific issues, certainly not yet well understood. Reliance upon mathematical modelling has profound weaknesses, if ALL parameters are not properly quantified, the model will reflect this, and in the climate field it is a both brave and foolish man who will not recognise this fact. The "Hockey Stick" is a case in point. Several versions have been produced, three I believe, and the statistical mathematics have been overturned by the highest statisticians in the US Government, years ago. But as long as "the system" must elect only MPs to positions requiring broad technical knowledge, and in this area they are almost non-existent, we shall continue to be deep in the mire. We have never had a Ministerial post in the energy sector, filled by a physical science or engineering graduate, never! Richard Phillips

MPs debate climate after school strike - but only a handful turn up

Mr Kettle meet Mrs Pot - calling kids standing up for what they believe in, and for their future, truants then not bothering to turn up to debate and maybe take some concrete action smacks of hypocrisy of the highest kind. Mind you what do we expect from our elected representatives really. While parliament bickers and works to the next 5 years and re-election can we really expect any of them to make the tough decisions that might be needed to halt the damage let alone repair it? What is needed is a cross party, non politically motivated panel of MPs, Scientists, Economists and other experts in various fields to sit round a big (recycled) table and thrash out a sensible, realistic plan for the next 50 years not the next 5. I say well done to the kids for standing up and making a noise. I''m of the "Hammer to Fall" generation - "we who grew up tall and proud, in the shadow of the mushroom cloud". Today''s kids are growing up in a much more scary shadow so it is up to them to "scream it louder and louder".

edie's Plastics Thinkathon results (Part Two): Solving the behaviour change challenge

Sounds like this was a really productive session, thank you for sharing the results. Here at Jump (https://www.teamjump.co.uk/), tackling behaviour change is at the crux of what we do. Our employee engagement programmes have a large focus on waste reduction, and single use plastic is a key priority so this Thinkathon was very relevant. Great that rewarding good behaviour , gamification and digital tools came up as we see these as key elements of an effective behaviour change programme. We look forward to reading about the next Thinkathon!

London pollution alert issued as regional air quality deemed 'unsafe'

Mayor Khan seems to be fighting a losing battle against pollution in London. As an asthma sufferer, let''s hope when the ULEZ (Ultra-low emission zone) is introduced in April it has a more positive effect. Somehow I doubt it though. A few points which I have not seen mentioned elsewhere are (a) With regards to these air-pollution "Hot Spots" - I am very surprised that nobody has mentioned the 300 - 500 tall air purifiers or smog-towers currently being trialled in Xian in China. These deliver significant improvements in air quality over 4 or more square miles and are cheap to run using solar panels - https://www.coastcaptureair.com/blog/transport-for-london-ulez-and-all-your-latest-atmospheric-quality-news . (b) Currently, drivers of old diesel vehicles pay a daily 10 Toxicity Charge plus the 11.50 congestion charge. Present total charge = 21.50. However, the T-Charge is going to be scrapped and replaced with a 24hr 12.50 ulez zone charge. New Total charge = 24.00 My point is this - For drivers whose entire livelihood absolutely depends on them driving into the city during the day. Is a measly 2.50 increase in charges really going to stop them from driving in? I don''t think so! Possibly it might put off some drivers who deliver overnight. My third and final point (c) concerns the scrappage scheme. I happen to own a 2004 diesel van and run a small business with less than 10 employees. I have to drive into London on most days. So I was delighted to hear Mayor Khan say, with much fanfare, that people just like me could trade in their old vehicle and receive a reasonable discount on a newer model. Guess what! My vehicle is too old to qualify for the Mayor''s scheme.

Report: EV industry must make charging network more accessible

V2G? I think that IF I had an EV, I would give considerable thought to the possibility of not having a fully charged battery, just because I have allowed the Grid have access it. Distance capacity is quite low enough as it is. Richard Phillips

Industrial-scale solar and battery facilities to be built in West Midlands

We have again a reference to battery storage in terms of mega-watts. This is meaningless without the fellow reference to the capacity, the mega-watt-hour figure. The absence of the latter leaves us without any knowledge of the length of time that the battery will be able to deliver power at 27 mega-watts. It is headlined as industrial scale. Hardly. Even the large battery to be built in Swindon, 50MW, 50MWh, is able to replace one twentieth of a "standard" power station of 1GW, for one hour. Orders of magnitude are involved here, let us be clear on the scale of operations. Richard Phillips

New tech on the block: 8 ways businesses are using blockchain to drive sustainability

These are all great initiatives. How are the claims going to be verified and audited to retain confidence in the market, which is already getting heavily questioned over the varacity of schemes and the robustness of the requirements?

Europe agrees sales targets for 'clean' buses in cities

Very good news! However, there is a common and unfortunate misconception conveyed by this text. "...buses in Germany and Sweden should be zero-emission by 2025 - i.e. electric." Only in Norway is en electrical bus a "zero emission vehicle". Buses built for running on gas ("Natural Gas Vehicles") fueled with biomethane have a lower carbon footprint than electrical buses. And since NGVs have ultra low emissions of particles as well as NOx, from a health perspective, they can be considered "zero emission vehicles". This is the reason why Swedish government have approved their use in city centers. So, it s a wiser investment for a city to opt for gas buses fuels with locally produced biomethane than for electrically charged buses. For both environmental and economical reasons. Dr Jan Rapp MD and founder of Biogas Academy

London Mayor launches ?23m van scrappage fund

I will be interested to see how the scheme ensures that the polluting vehicle is properly scrapped and does not make its way into the outer regions of the UK For use there. Given the substantial lead time for Euro 6 and EV Vans is the scheme really going to have much effect by 8 April ?

Evian's reusable water bottles and VW's 'carbon-neutral' EVs: The sustainability success stories of

The Evian water bottle is an absolutely ridiculous waste of time, why does it need a silicon sleeve? Why not simply a recyclable glass bottle?

Iceland removes plastic packaging from fresh produce lines in 'greengrocer' scheme

If the consumer doesn''t have a choice but to buy loose in paper bags then that is what they will do. Simples really. Morrisons already have paper bags instead of plastic for their loose fruit and veg. Personally I would prefer all fruit and veg to be loose so I can buy 1 parsnip or 1 onion instead of being forced to buy 5 or 6 in a plastic bag. Not every household is 4 or 5 people, some of us live alone or as a couple and don''t need family packs of veg.

Volvo Trucks' first all-electric vehicles land in Europe

It may be noted that with respect to hydrogen, this gas does not, (as does methane), occur naturally. Every molecule must be manufactured, and when it is burned, less energy than that required for its production, is liberated. Litre for litre, it produces only one third as much energy as methane. Difficult to handle. But don''t tell the politicians, they might query why the business element is so keen. The answer could possibly be in all the subsidies to be garnered from the public purse. This latter, for these purposes, seems to have no bottom!!! Richard Phillips

Volvo Trucks' first all-electric vehicles land in Europe

Anybody know what the payload is on this vehicle compared to a standard trucks 10.5 tonnes? 300kWh of batteries will weigh some 3 tonnes alone. Are they LiFePO4? Air cooled or liquid cooled?

Ikea's air-purifying curtains and solar space stations: The best green innovations of the week

Each ROAM unit has a storage capacity of 700Wh and a power output of 1kWm. I am puzzled by 1kWm, may we have some explanation, please.? 390g of liquid hydrogen is over 5 litres, and difficult to contain. This does not seem quite correct to me. Perhaps this referred to a number of flights? Richard Phillips

The Sustainability Oscars 2019: Celebrating the best of climate activism

Matt, RSVP do you ever include fictional movies called cli-fi genre features? I coined thirteen in 2011 for movies and novels, see cli-fi.net...also see my clifi movie blog on korgw101.Blogspot.com and maybe next year start including fiction movies in your list too. RSVP . Dan bloom age 70

The Sustainability Oscars 2019: Celebrating the best of climate activism

Matt, do you ever include fictional movies called cli-fi genre features? I coined thirteen in 2011 for movies and novels, see cli-fi.net...also see my clifi movie blog on korgw101.Blogspot.com and maybe next year start including fiction movies in your list too. RSVP . Dan bloom age 70

The Sustainability Oscars 2019: Celebrating the best of climate activism

Matt, do you ever include fictional movies called cli-fi genre features? I coined thirteen in 2011 for movies and novels, see cli-fi.net...also see my movie blog on korgw101.Blogspot.com and maybe next year start including fiction movies in your list too. RSVP . Dan bloom age 70

UK homes jeopardising national climate targets, report warns

The CCC, tarnished by revelations about its Chairman, Lord Deben, might be unaware of, but are more likely wilfully ignoring, burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear power reactors? They have never mentioned the unique BWRX-300 SMR, which is a reactor design that is so simple, and therefore cost-effective, it is unlikely to be bettered from an overnight cost perspective. In 15 years time the 300 MWe, BWRX-300 will be available at a cost of 462 million. It will have its EPZ at the boundary fence of its tiny site, meaning it can be located close to centres of population. It is rated at 900 MWt so can be configured for CHP operation and provide not only 24/7, low-carbon electricity, but also much of the heating and hot water to buildings which, of itself, accounts for 40% of all of the UK''s energy use. The UK uses 340 TWh per year. 150 of these BWRX-300 SMRs would supply 100% of the 24/7 electricity and much of the heat and hot water we use, for 60 years at a cost of 70 billion. For renewables to supply 340 TWh, desecrating our countryside is a big issue, so maybe solar would creep up to 10% and wind would probably split to 30% onshore and 60% offshore for the rest. Solar would cost 43 billion, onshore 48 billion, offshore 115 billion. Then, when the Sun don t shine and the wind don t blow, we d have to have 38 billion of CCGTs. Backed-up intermittent electricity for just 25/30 years tots up to 244 billion. So for 60 years that would be around 553 billion. We can choose to pay 70 billion for guaranteed 24/7, low-carbon electricity and much of the heat and hot water for buildings for 60 years. Or we can choose to pay 7.9X more in overnight cost and 100X more cost in terms of scenic desecration, resource waste, ecosystem destruction, species wipe out and waste mountains. The CCC is Hell-bent on advising the Government to go the way of the latter option and it will be us - the bill payers and tax payers - who shoulder the financial burden. Instead of spending our own money on our own lifestyle choices, we''ll be putting money into the pockets of people like Lord Deben.

UK gas must be 'completely' decarbonised by 2050, says think-tank

All forms of gas powered, water filled house central heating are obsolete and have been for a very long time - the Romans would laugh if they saw our current central heating dependence on gas and water. Instead, we should be building well insulated properties with heating from ground source heat pumps or thermostatically controlled, timer assisted, fan assisted, renewables powered, electric heaters in each room so that you have the heat where you want it, when you want it and at the level you require. Moving to modular house built in factories from materials with a hign mu factor and then assembled on site should also be pursued. These measures would greatly reduce emissions and tackle the REAL problem we are facing, namely GLOBAL POLLUTION, not climate change which is a cycle planet Earth has been going through since it first formed.

CCC advises government against rolling over carbon budget surplus

It might be useful if edie produced an explanation, suitable for layman''s eyes, of the meaning of EQUIVALENT in "2,782 megatonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (MtCO2e)". Richard Phillips

UK homes jeopardising national climate targets, report warns

Energy Efficiency Grants should be available to all households and not just those on benefits, even though low income households are likely to see the biggest impact on their energy expenditure it isn''t fair to penalise those who pay the taxes to exclude them from grants. Not every working household can afford the cost of improved loft insulation or a new condensing central heating boiler or other energy efficiency measures but unless you are claiming benefits most times you can not get help.

Waitrose installs Formula One technology to boost energy savings from fridges

Fitting doors to the fridges would be a good start instead of trying to refrigerate the entire store then heating it back up again. If Co-Op can do it, Lidl, Aldi, even Tesco Metro then every supermarket chain in the country should be able to. Don''t need F1 tech just plain common sense

The new kids on the climate block - Matt Mace's blog

Respect to all the students for stating their concerns about global warming!

Audi to install Europe's largest rooftop solar array in 'climate-neutral' bid

Does the array also capture emissions resulting from the dieselgate scandal?

Energy resilience roundtable: Paving the path to a clean energy future

The whole nub of the discussion devolves, in the first place, upon the second paragraph: While historically the UK is used to stable supplies and relatively stable prices, resilience is moving up the agenda as the energy landscape undergoes a radical transformation from large centralised coal plants to an increasingly renewable and smaller-scale gas-fired world. My concern is primarily with electricity. All the problems arise from the body politic, being almost entirely bereft of scientific and engineering knowledge, being persuaded by business interests, that renewable energy was the saviour of the world. Those interests were not concerned in the least with the generation of "clean", (CO2 free) energy, but with access to almost limitless public funds. Renewable energy, of every description, is dependent upon natural forces which are essentially totally outside any human control. All of them. This overawing disadvantage is the origin of the tsunami of corrective devices introduced to bring us back to a reliable electricity supply. It is a problem with Medusa-like properties. The ideal electricity supply is that which meets demand on all occasions, at an affordable cost to the consumer. It drives industry. We have the problem of energy storage, hydro systems, battery complexes, electrolysis, tidal currents and lagoons, river dams, and a plethora of mechanical devices. All are huge, expensive, and, due the nature of electricity, relatively very short-term systems; long term is a few days. But nature can shut down for as long as two weeks. Not the sun, certainly, but that is a nightly outage. The problem is being tackled at the wrong end. Utilise a generating system which is dependable), and "clean", and most of all totally under our control. And that system is NUCLEAR. But a certain Mrs T destroyed it in 1989. "We do not need a nuclear industry, we can buy reactors in the market as need arises" . Fat chance after Moorside and Wylfa. The present system of dispersed generation gives rise to the SMART brigade. The smart grid, and most reviled of all, the smart meter, totally unable to save money per se, but costing, eventually it is estimated, about 20bn. The object of the device is ultimately to vary costs at will. But will HMG listen, of course not, why should a Historian listen to a scientist or electrical engineer when electricity is under discussion. Silly me. Richard Phillips I am a retired research scientist, having spent the last 35 years of my professional career at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Oxfordshire. Since retirement I have continued to take a keen interest in all energy matters, and have a wide circle of very experienced contacts in all aspects of the industry. I have thus acquired a wide knowledge of the spectrum of energy matters from nuclear generation to renewables. I became, by examination, an Associate of the Royal Institute of Chemistry in 1954, and was elected a Fellow in 1971.

Government unveils deposit return scheme blueprints as part of waste management revamp

"We are committed to cementing our place as a world leader in resource efficiency" This sort of crap makes me furious. Chapter 6 of Decembers waste review was entitled "Leading the world Showing by example or some such nonsense. Germany has had all this in place for 25 years. It works well, is documented and refined and the UK would do well to adopt it without delay. Why cant politicians and Gove seems to be amongst the worst just say we will do a lot better and this is what we are going to do based on our experience and other countries experience. Why do we have to lead the f***ing world every time some sort of action has to be taken especially when it is obvious to a half wit that we are going to come up short again. I have read the report and it is clear that while things will get better, they will be still be a long way off countries like Germany.

Audi to install Europe's largest rooftop solar array in 'climate-neutral' bid

The old GWh quoted, no mention of the variation of the rate of generation. Lots of noonday summer power, but none at the ends of the day. And storage is expensive. No renewable replaces dispatchable generation, make it when its needed, not catch ne if you can!! Richard Phillips

Government unveils vision for national deposit return scheme

Do people have the extra money to pay upfront?

Pollutant-trapping pavements and electric rickshaws: The best green innovations to tackle air qualit

"Contrary to popular belief, carbon isn't inherently evil" It is truly extraordinary that such a statement could ever see the light of day. There is nothing "evil" about carbon; it is the very staff of life. Firstly, the uninitiated speak of "carbon" mean carbon dioxide. Carbon is a solid element, better known as graphite, (in our pencils), or diamond. And the gas, CO2, is utterly vital to life itself. Below a concentration of about 150ppm, photo-synthesis ceases. No plant life, no vegetable matter, no animals, no food. We would never ever have evolved. During the last thirty years or so, CO2 increases have made our planet greener by about 13%, this includes better crops. And it is a far weaker greenhouse gas than water vapour, being some sixty times less abundant. It is reputed to punch far above weight as a greenhouse gas. The "explanation" of this, by an ex-chief scientist from the Met Office, is as difficult to justify as the very incomplete radiational explanations of the IPCC, whose temperature rise forecasts are so hugely variable. The subject is not well understood at a scientific level. So lets be a little objective for a change. Richard Phillips

Pollutant-trapping pavements and electric rickshaws: The best green innovations to tackle air qualit

I am so pleased to see SEAT moving forward with the NOX reducing concrete technology, I remember giving a sustainability presentation on this technology with Ecopurer to one of the worlds biggest construction and project management companies and one of the worlds biggest oil companies 20 years ago and they laughed me out of the building. Its a shame that are approach to environmental problems is still often a reactive one as opposed to a proactive one.

Hydrogen bikes and electric 'delivery dogs': The best green innovations of CES 2019

Hydrogen Bikes? Compressed Hydrogen between your knees? Really? That''s like sitting with a compressed Hindenberg inches from your delicates. And what happens when you get "volvo''d" and the tank ruptures? Hell, Road, Intentions, Good, Paved, to, is, with - rearrange accordingly

Valentine's Day: How the cocoa supply chain is falling in love with ethical practices

Olam Cocoa procures more than 9.5 metric tonnes of cocoa every year,----- factor of a million or so out?

Electric cars are already cheaper to own and run, says study

Okay, a couple of points that need to be clarified in this report. Firstly what is the cost of the electricity that is used in the analysis? public charging points can range from 12p per kilowatt hour to 35p per kilowatt hour. Not everybody can recharge at the lower UK domestic rate of around 6p per kWh. Secondly there is a big difference between the cost of an electric vehicle and the profitability of the electric vehicle. They will only achieve mass market when the manufacturers Make the same profitability as they get with traditional cars. No one seems to be addressing this current differential. If battery prices are dropping how come LG have just increased the prices to Audi for the new model? Finally nothing is taken into account of the loss of fuel duty revenue and how that will be recovered from the owners of electric cars which in turn will affect the running costs of those vehicles. There is still a long way to go before we have a profitable transition to electric vehicles.

Electric cars are already cheaper to own and run, says study

Okay, a couple of points that need to be clarified in this report. Firstly what is the cost of the electricity that is used in the analysis? public charging points can range from 12p per kilowatt hour to 35p per kilowatt hour. Not everybody can recharge at the lower UK domestic rate of around 6p per kWh. Secondly there is a big difference between the cost of an electric vehicle and the profitability of the electric vehicle. They will only achieve mass market when the manufacturers Make the same profitability as they get with traditional cars. No one seems to be addressing this current differential. If battery prices are dropping how come LG have just increased the prices to Audi for the new model? Finally nothing is taken into account of the loss of fuel duty revenue and how that will be recovered from the owners of electric cars which in turn will affect the running costs of those vehicles. There is still a long way to go before we have a profitable transition to electric vehicles.

Palm oil: Certified but NOT sustainable - The Changing Markets blog

Palm oil: Certified but NOT sustainable - The Changing Markets blog

I am very pleased to see this article as I was very disappointed to read JP''s thoughts. It seems to me there is growing concern regarding the use of certification schemes and what they actually mean in practice. This particular scheme seems to be masking other issues, such as why has palm oil become so prevalent (because it''s cheap, maybe..? and why is it cheap, I wonder..) the issue of how we will feed a growing population. Why is there a need to de-forest at all? Calling slowing down of habitat destruction, or doing it ''more thoughtfully'', seems like a nonsense to me. Because of this I don''t buy in to some these schemes as a consumer; there is a danger that schemes that are actually delivering benefits will be overlooked as a result.

Palm oil: Certified but NOT sustainable - The Changing Markets blog

I am very pleased to see this article as I was very disappointed to read JP''s thoughts. It seems to me there is growing concern regarding the use of certification schemes and what they actually mean in practice. This particular scheme seems to be masking other issues, such as why has palm oil become so prevalent (because it''s cheap, maybe..? and why is it cheap, I wonder..) the issue of how we will feed a growing population. Why is there a need to de-forest at all? Calling slowing down of habitat destruction, or doing it ''more thoughtfully'', seems like a nonsense to me. Because of this I don''t buy in to some these schemes as a consumer; there is a danger that schemes that are actually delivering benefits will be overlooked as a result.

Lord Deben: Closed-loop plastic system 'perfectly possible' with revamped policy

New research in the Journal of Industrial Ecology from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) shows that, when accounting for the plastic quality and presence of impurities, less than 55% of post-consumer plastic can be recovered with contamination levels low enough for further recycling. The researchers estimate that only about 40% of our plastic loops can be closed using current technology and recycling systems. If we truly wish to close our material loops, we need to rethink the way we recycle plastic. See the article at https://rdcu.be/bb1qL

#ThisIsACrisis: 7 harsh realities of the global climate crisis

Alice C, I respect your criticism, but these comments are hardly the place to give such references. I mentioned Paul Homewood as his "Not a lot of people know that" website explores the full data behind these alarmist statements. I have found them convincing without knowing anything of Mr Homewood himself. He relies on published data that often goes back to 1760 or so. "Since records began" might just mean the satellite records of no more than 40 years! For what it''s worth, I have four degrees in agricultural engineering, including a PhD in agricultural pollution, and retain a very sceptical frame of mind - especially when viewing the sort of stuff Grantham puts out. I have no axe to grind. Others often want to change the basis of our society. Hence their enthusiasm for EVs or hydrogen as a fuel, without any appreciation of the source of the energy needed, or an understanding of the 2nd law of thermodynamics, which I used to teach!

#ThisIsACrisis: 7 harsh realities of the global climate crisis

Ken, I trust that you have scientific or peer-reviewed articles to base your critique off. No the IPPR is not a scientific report, however it does reference a large number of peer-reviewed articles which I can only assume you also have to back up your statements. I don''t think Paul Homewood (the retired accountant with no biographical information on his blog) quite ticks the box here. Surely we are too intelligent and well-informed to regard your comment as worthy of note (without any credible sources).

How meeting the Paris Agreement will improve global economic growth

The report also looks at the future of the transport sector - the UK s largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting sector last year, accounting for 28% of national emissions. Under the scenario, local authorities would need to create legislative frameworks that ensure electric vehicles (EVs) are a mainstream mode of transportation by 2020. A proportional tax on vehicle registration related to their carbon emissions per kilometre would also need to be introduced immediately. I know we are not supposed to take any of this stuff seriously, but even so, 2020 has to be a typo. That''s next year!!! And EVs need to be the mainstream mode of transport??? And it begs the question of where the energy comes from. On a windy day like today, renewables are providing 33% of our electricity needs. So, multiply that by 3 to replace the CCGT, that is offering half of our needs,and all the other sources. Oh, and then add enough to power all those EVs - 20-30 million of them. At this point, you just decide that the lunatics have taken over the asylum - or at least that green environmentalists failed their GCSE maths!

#ThisIsACrisis: 7 harsh realities of the global climate crisis

I trust that readers of edie are too intelligent and well informed to regard this stuff from IPPR as worthy of note. Most of what they say is wrong or at least questionable. 1. Extreme weather events are not getting more frequent 2. What is the "dangerous destabilisation" to be caused by CO2 levels? They claim that the levels are "stagnating" at 405 ppm. Pretty serious effect for a 16% increase over the ideal of 350 ppm, and about one third the optimum level for plant growth 3. Does anyone believe that 58,000 species are becoming extinct every year? 4. The soil has been treated the same way for generations. East Anglian soil is disappearing because it is peat - and that oxidises when disturbed. Has done for generations. 5. Ocean acidification much mentioned. It used to be pH8.3. Now it is pH8.2. That is still very alkaline. Neutral is 7.0 and it is a logarithmic scale. The word is totally inappropriate, and only used to scare the ignorant. 6. Plastics are universal and essential. We just need to dispose of them properly - ideally by incineration, to liberate heat and electricity. 7. Crop yields have been increasing continually for decades. We eat better now than ever. What is wrong with people eating a lot of maize, wheat and rice? Note that NASA says the planet is getting greener, as we grow more forests and crops. This IPPR report is a political statement referring to Jeremy Grantham''s asset management company''s report and not scientific papers. Read Paul Homewood for a comprehensive debunking of the whole scare story...

How meeting the Paris Agreement will improve global economic growth

There appears to be a contradiction in terms here. The Paris agreement/COP 24 States quite clearly that we need to have a 50% reduction in fossil fuel use within 15 years and achieved zero fossil fuels by 2050. Though this is caged in terms of fossil fuel emissions on the dream basis that CCS will deliver all and thus implies that there is a business as usual element to it. The bottom line on GDP is that it does not measure wealth, well-being, or even include debt. What it actually primarily measures is gross (Direct and embedded) fossil fuel consumption. Thus to potentially nail global warming to 1.5 C (and this avoid catastrophic climate change) we need to deliver zero fossil fuel consumption and also achieve an increase in GDP? Contradiction in terms? Or maybe we need to develop a metric for a well-being index to replace the nonsense of GDP?

Living Lagom in London: Inside Ikea's new 'leading' sustainable store

Thanks for the article, hope this is going to be the template for NZ''s first ever IKEA... #liveinhope

Drax begins capturing biomass carbon emissions in 'world first'

Quite so, Kieron. Drax already receiving large subsidies, paid for by all in heir electricity bills, just how much this "new" process will cost is anybody''s guess. The process does not seem to fundamentally different to those already attempted, without economic success. The difference lies in the adsorber. The scale of plant to be constructed, running costs in plant operation and final disposal costs cannot be radically different from fore-runners. The CEO of Drax, Will Gardiner, is quoted as exalting the technology, but hardly an engineer or scientist. In LinkedIn his graduate qualifications are quoted as International Relations and Economics, and Soviet Studies. Excellent in their field, no doubt whatsoever; but involving not too much thermodynamics. And should we be felling whole forest areas in the USA just to feed out power stations? Wood is a poor fuel for this purpose, mainly a carbohydrate, cellulose, half of its weight is water, chemically combined. This is boiled off by the combustion of the carbon, the steam produced is heated to about 190oC, and blown up the chimney! Our domestic gas "boilers", have to recover this heat, condensing boilers; not Drax, we pay them to do it. Oh dear! Richard Phillips

Drax begins capturing biomass carbon emissions in 'world first'

Seriously? Drax to be the first negative emission power station? Do you really expect us to believe that garbage? Firstly factor in the oil used to cut down the trees, then the power used to process the wood into pellets then add in the fuel oil used to transport the pellets thousands of miles across the sea, now add in the fuel used to transport the pellets to Drax to be burnt. Finally add in the power used by this BECCS unit. OK so how much Carbon Dioxide will Drax have to remove to be negative emissions? Now I am not saying the technology itself is bad, far from it. If it works then it may well help but until the true energy cost of Biomass is taken into account there is no way it can ever be called "green".

Adidas to double production of ocean plastic trainers in 2019

Good afternoon Sarah. I just wondered if Adidas is planning to reduce the quantity of its other trainers produced - or is there simply going to be an increase in the quantity that it produces. Also how does the life cycle of the trainer compare with other trainers. Also could you find out what happens to the trainer at the end of its life - can it be recycled? Thank you!

Plastic waste: UK should not pass buck to world's poorest, say MPs

The UK has no coherent programme for the manner in which all plastic waste should be disposed. Until HMG controls the whole of the system, a hotch-potch of means of disposal will be used which provides for that particular operator to work at a profit, irrespective of the landfill or export consequences. But Mr Gove''s heart, indeed the poicy, is set against a uniform government policy. The real answer is to separate distinct streams, and burn the rest. These streams could be milk-type bottles and clear bottles. Richard Phillips

Jonathon Porritt: Silence 'no longer an option' for business sustainability

The end of life on earth as we know it today is being forecast, he added, so silence really is not an option any longer and ignorance as to these things is certainly no longer an available excuse. Does anyone reading this column actually believe this? We have had warnings like this for decades, and they have all proved false. This one, be it from Jonathan or the IPCC, is no different, just more shrill. It would be good to take a poll of readers of edie to see how many have done anything to seek to achieve the sort of result Mr Porritt and the IPCC want to see - in the next 12 years...

Call for decentralised energy optimisation as FIT regime due to end

The electrical generating system seems to be going back 100 years. The Electricity Supply Act of 1926 dictated the generation of electricity to be from large centralised power stations, all connected to a country-wide Grid of high voltage of 132KV, (later 250 and 400KV). We all had the same current, no additional corrective devices were needed. And the whole change paid for itself in efficiency, and prices fell. Now every turbine and solar panel needs own system before it contributes to our power system. And it all costs more, but the costs, including subsidies, which we all pay, are hidden, just included in our bills. These monies, moreover go to predominantly overseas companies. But it is all dominated not by Electrical Engineers but by finance, because the object is not to generated useful power, but money. Richard Phillips

Carbon Brief: UK's emissions could have doubled since 1990 without renewable energy

This a very helpful analysis from Carbon Brief.Just a couple of real world observations. The first is that most of the emission savings in buildings have come not from changes in electricity usage, but from the decline in natural gas consumption( down 28% since 2005). The main use of energy in buildings is for heating- where gas has an over 80% dominance. Electricity is critical just for appliances, particularly lighting and white goods - where there have as reported been quantum improvements in energy efficiency The second is that particularly over the last quarter century, there has not been that significant a change from heavy to light industry. It is commercial services and the public sector which have seen growth, and less efficiency gains than there should have been. There remains enormous potential to decrease consumption way further, without damaging productivity. The French call it energy sobriety!

Carbon Brief: UK's emissions could have doubled since 1990 without renewable energy

Could have, would have all meaningless phrases when we know they haven''t.

EV100: Corporate demand for green fleets now outstripping charging infrastructure improvements

The technically knowledgeable was warning of the problem of establishing charging points, years ago. But do the administrators listen; only with an airy wave of the hand, "It will all work out". It still does not seem to have sunk in; huge numbers of these points have to established in order to meet demand. This is not a simple "stich up the post" affair. that "post" has to be connected to the mains, at a high demand rate. That means heavy cabling. And that means an upgrade in the local transformer point; which then has to take its current from the Grid. It all means a lot of digging in the roads, and the placing of more copper in the ground. And to back it all, more generation. And we have just lost the construction of two major nuclear plants, which would have generated some 5,500,000 megawatts between them. Vehicles on the road, some 3 million cars unless I am mistaken, and then the heavies, and there may be 145,000 EVs by 2030.??? By that time we may be realising, when the voice of the more rational elements of scientific view of climate change begins to be heard, that CO2 does not punch with the outrageously heavy hand proclaimed at the moment, and we realise that perhaps the sun has something to do with it. I will still have my nice clean diesel and will fill up for 500 miles in five minutes flat. Richard Phillips

UK cities to become climate 'hubs' under new £3.5m scheme

Yes, Ken, quite. Its words again, with very little meaning. How many of the people involved will have the faintest idea of how to develop "a network of research facilities" And the nature of the "research"? They will take the money and produce a lot of paperwork, all meaningless. The only exception will be finance bit, and 3.5m will vanish in a wealth of confetti. Rubbish, but the BEIS. Richard Phillips

Carbon Brief: UK's emissions could have doubled since 1990 without renewable energy

I don''t think many "individuals turned to energy-efficiency measures like ... electric heating to reduce their bills". Although technologies such as Ground Source Heat Pumps are a great technology, they are hard to retrofit and have a tiny market share. Domestically the savings in heat energy have come from two main things: 1) gas condensing boilers (which typically use around 15-20% less fuel per unit of heat output, and are often accompanied by upgraded controls which increase the savings further), and 2) better insulation, with the cumulative effect of publicly supported schemes for cavity walls and loft insulation more than offsetting the sometimes slow take-up in the private sector. The only reason emissions have not fallen further has been the move to more (though often smaller) household numbers.

Sustainable snow days: How remote working can reduce environmental impacts for business

I work from home for three days a week and in the office for two days. I have an hour''s drive each way into the office. This arrangement allows me a good mix of interaction with colleagues and meetings and time to concentrate on projects. It is definitely good for saving on food packaging waste and fuel usage. As my partner is semi-retired and works from home, this doesn''t create a lot more energy use in the home as it is being heated anyway and we use low energy light bulbs. The best thing is that it aids a good work/life balance and helps keep me sane!

UK cities to become climate 'hubs' under new ?3.5m scheme

Does anyone really believe that 3.5 million over 5 years is going to achieve anything in this area? We could barely build a single pedestrian footbridge for that money. And yet it is going to establish a network of research facilities across the country and " will explore innovative approaches to sustainable finance, renewable energy and low-carbon projects". I wish them luck, but will not be holding my breath...

Scotland's first coffee cup recycling scheme launched in Glasgow

We have a plant that can recycle 100 million coffee cups a year .This plant can take the plastic out of the cups in one piece and leave the paper 100% free of plastic. Dennis Australia

Onshore limits on turbine size could make offshore wind cheaper

But guess what? They still only generate when the wind blows!! At this moment 12.30 Thursday, wind energy is at 2.37GW, and coal at 5.39GW. Demand is 48GW. Rather cold day. This does rather emphasize the significance of the ability to respond to demand. Renewables cannot and will not ever, be able to do it. Richard Phillips

Ben & Jerry's pledges to ban all single-use plastics by 2020

I can recycle your Ice cream cups and coffee cups as my process can take out the plastic from the cups and save the paper to be used again Dennis Collins Australia

Corporate clean energy purchases smash record in 2018

It would be interesting to know just how GW can be purchased. GW are a measure of the Rate at which energy is being generated. It is analogous to the speed of car as opposed to the distance travelled. It really is high time that the basics of the electrical energy system are understood by those who write about it. Richard Phillips

VW and Ford forge partnership to spur low-carbon transport transition

But where will all the power come from to charge all these vehicles. We have just lost two potential nuclear power stations, HMG has indicated that coal fired generation will continue to be closed. I cannot avoid the conclusion that HMG has not the fundamental understanding of the electrical power industry, and does not, moreover have any intention to remedy this defect. I see no end to this madness. Richard Phillips

In numbers: How the UK public is shunning sustainable actions in favour of convenience

Showing the the stat that shows 23% still ask for paperless bills carries the implication this is a bad thing. The alternative of an email bill carries huge energy costs for creation, cloud storage and retrieval, let alone your inbox is then fair game for the supplier. A significant proportion of people who opt for an e Bill go on to print out at home for high value items. I suspect that a full life cycle comparison between point of sale paper Bill (recyclable at end of life) versus e Bill (forever in the cloud) would make people think twice about thinking paper=bad .

In numbers: How the UK public is shunning sustainable actions in favour of convenience

Unfortunately people are by nature lazy and even those that purport to hold ''green views'' will often only do what is convenient. A multi layered approach is needed combining education and information with practical measures, investment in affordable practical public transport and meaningful and enforceable legislation that encourages sustainability and penalises those that chose to waste precious resources and pollute our environment.

Why sustainable business leadership must become the new normal post-IPCC

Whilst I wholly agree with Tim I believe that insufficient numbers of businesses will adopt a strong sustainability policy let alone enact one. We therefore need legislation with material penalties to force the changes needed to make a real difference.

From charging innovations to rival collaborations: 7 ways the EV revolution is accelerating in 2019

Key point not yet discussed is when will there be profit parity for electric vehicles versus their diesel /petrol counterparts. Cost is one thing, profit is another. Secondly there needs to be improved by a protection on residual battery life for the second hand user vehicle market, There is currently precious little protection and clarity relating to this factor which is key to ensuring long-term market penetration.

Tesco launches community cookery school in food redistribution drive

An interesting idea and this type of initiative needs to be constantly reinforced to gain some real traction.

Stepping up the global energy transformation: Why Mars Australia commits to 100% renewable electrici

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Nottingham unveils bid to become the UK's first carbon-neutral city

Electric and Biomethane buses not hydrogen.

Top 10 tips to eliminate single-use plastics from your business

I wish you would add a print-friendly option to the "Share list". Too many ads and poor formatting waste ink & paper!

How Microsoft is 'going beyond its four walls' to solve global sustainability challenges

Laudible from Microsoft, but I wonder if they have calculated how much unnecessary energy is used globally by computers running Windows and Office 365 being left running, when they are required to download and install mandatory updates. Updates which may contain apps the user may not want or need.

Experts or the Crowd: Who should we listen to? - The ICRS Blog

Richard and I are in agreement again :-) With 21 years experience in the offshore oil and gas industry as a degree qualified Geologist I find it worrying that expertise is a bad word today. If experts are not being listened to and respected what is the point in going to University? Or doing research if it is to be shouted down by the "crowd of sheeples"? Take decommissioning of oil platforms for instance. Current expert advice is to "dead head" the steel jackets down to a safe depth below sea surface and leave them in place. Why? In the 40 years many have been standing in the North Sea they have become thriving ecosystems based around an artificial reef. The abundance of sea life on and around these structures is phenomenal (I''ve seen it for myself thanks to ROV footage). Some of the biggest fish you are ever likely to see and amazing sea lilies, cold water corals and other invertebrates. Leave the steel jackets to slowly rust away and we create one of the largest submarine ecosystems on the planet in the middle of the North Sea. However the "greens" are demanding total removal of all subsea structures and returning the seabed to the state it was 40 years ago. In other words a trawled and destroyed wasteland devoid of all sea life. Who do you believe? The sheep on their bandwagons or the experts who have spent years researching and observing the environment? Personally I''ll trust the experts on this one.

Toyota and Panasonic forge partnership to develop EV batteries

I question the concept of "a battery with fifty times more capacity than the average 2018 model". The meaning is, presumably, a battery of the similar dimensions, but with fifty times the number of kilowatt-hours contained therein. The manner in which this type battery operates depends upon a specific reversible reaction, which is associated with one or more electrons. The mass of the chemicals involved in each reaction is fixed according to the chemical equation involved. The reduction in the weight of these seems highly unlikely to be reduced by a factor of fifty; this seems like some administrative dream, but I stand to be corrected. Richard Phillips

Nuclear strategy in 'meltdown' after Wylfa suspension

""... In many ways, the challenge of financing new nuclear is one of falling costs and greater abundance of alternative technologies, which means that nuclear is being outcompeted. ...."" This is our Secretary of State for energy; utterly oblivious to burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactors. The FOAK GE-Hitachi will be operational in 2030 at $3,000/kW. In 15 years time, the NOAK will be down to $2,000/kW. The UK uses 340 TWh per year. 150 of these BWRX-300 SMRs would supply 100% of the 24/7 electricity we use, for 60 years at a cost of 70 billion. The USA''s Nuclear regulator says the Emergency Planning Zone [EPZ] for SMRs will be at the boundary fence, compared to the 10 mile radius EPZs for current nuclear. They are 100s or even 1,000s of times safer and can be sited near population centres to provide much of the heat too. For renewables to supply 340 TWh, desecrating our countryside is a big issue, so maybe solar would creep up to 5% and wind would probably split to 1/3 onshore and 2/3 offshore for the rest. Solar would cost 21.6 billion, onshore 63.9 billion, offshore 121.4 billion. Then, when the Sun don''t shine and the wind don''t blow, we''d have to have 30 billion of CCGTs. Backed-up intermittent electricity for just 25/30 years tots up to 236.9 billion So for 60 years that would be around 560 billion. Super safe BWRX-300 needing 50 sites, with 3 per site near to population centres would not only supply 100% of the 24/7 electricity needed, but in CHP mode supply much of the heat too. That''s twice the bang for their bucks for investors and well on the way to solving the Government''s biggest headache of decarbonising heating. 70 billion for guaranteed 24/7 electricity for 60 years or 8X more cost, scenic desecration, resource waste, ecosystem destruction, species wipe out and waste mountains. He''s going to decide for us all, if we let him.

'A 1.5C world is circular': Nations urged to drive resource productivity to reach climate goals

Hi Joel, the report is at https://www.circularity-gap.world/ - just click ''full report''.

'A 1.5C world is circular': Nations urged to drive resource productivity to reach climate goals

Good morning and thank you for pointing this. It the report available?

Claire Perry: UK's business community must help create a 'just' low-carbon transition

"installing community-owned solar arrays at schools and other local facilities as an example of creating a win-win for disadvantaged communities" The costs of installation and payments for generation fall equally upon the poorest as on the richest, by inclusion on electricity bills, but un-itemised. Richard Phillips

Experts or the Crowd: Who should we listen to? - The ICRS Blog

I find this article rather worrying. I am a retired research scientist, having spent the last 35 years of my professional career at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell in Oxfordshire. Since retirement I have continued to take a keen interest in all energy matters, and have a wide circle of very experienced contacts in all aspects of the industry. I have thus acquired a wide knowledge of the spectrum of energy matters from nuclear generation to renewables. I became, by examination, an Associate of the Royal Institute of Chemistry in 1954, and was elected a Fellow in 1971. The question of "sustainability" is highly complex, involving not only my own area of the physical sciences, but the biological and botanical ones, and what are generally regarded as the social sciences. It is therefore a new area of study and, like "climate science", will suffer from the intrusion of an undesirable element of smart fast talkers, who, to those who are not deeply immersed in the discipline, will be taken at their own evaluation. The understanding of both our climate, and how we should better manage our impact upon our environment, are new studies, and have a long road to travel. Those in senior positions have a heavy responsibility to identify, and eliminate (by pure reason) those who seek to "make a quick buck" and move on. The climate science scandals of a few years ago should make us alive to such matters. Indeed, in climate science, I can find no analysis of the molecular mechanism by which CO2 has an influence so much beyond its concentration. Determining the fundamental truths underlying both sustainability and climate science are absolutely vital, but exceedingly difficult. REAL experts are needed. But the title "expert" is not a nice one, has anybody got a better???? As King Alfred is said to have remarked "The saddest thing about any man is that he is ignorant, and the most exciting thing is that he knows" And the again, Marie Curie Nothing in life is to be feared, it is to be understood . Richard Phillips

On demand coming soon: edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

Hi Clare, The webinar will be available on demand shortly, and can be accessed via the edie homepage once live

Renewables forecast to overtake fossil fuels in 2020

Richard, yes there are the periods of slack water with tides but these are very, very predictable and therefore manageable. Not only that the periods of slack are not the same around the country, or even up the same stretch of sea loch. I live in Fort William at the end of Loch Linnhe, here we have a 3 sea loch system linked by 5 "narrows" (Connel, Ballachulish, Kinlochlevan, Corran and Loch Eil). High tide between Oban at one end and Corpach at the other differs by 9 minutes today and at Corpach we have a 2.5m range (spring tide is 4m). I use this as an example of how a system of tidal stream generation at these 5 locations would minimise the "slack" period and how on a larger scale the Grid can manage the slack. Each of these narrows has currents that can exceed 6kts at spring tide. I''m sure there are other locations around the country that have similar characteristics. With the rivers as long as you have sufficient flow you don''t need to have the considerable drop, although the drop does help dramatically. At Caversham Locks, Reading, the flow as recorded upstream of the Lock was between 20 to 50 cubic meters per second (Q) most days (currently 19.5Q). The weir had a 2m drop and crunching the numbers that gives around 250KW potential. I agree you''d need a lot of units to harness that and make it viable in terms of the GW we need but imagine the river as a long linear power plant and doesn''t it start to make a bit more sense? The towed hydro-generator you can get for a boat does rely on the boat moving through the water. And yes that does rely on the ever erratic nature of the wind but the beauty of a boat is the sails are adjustable to extract every last joule of energy from the wind regardless of direction of travel or wind (subject to the laws of physics and being "in irons"). There are several designs but all will add valuable amps to the power system on a boat, some even flip upside down and become wind generators for when you are at anchor. Now imagine the same hydro-generator(s) lowered into a fast flowing river. Instead of the generator moving through the water the water is moving passed the generator. Same effect the turbine spins and power is generated. Apply the same linear idea and a power station is born. There is a study into this exact thing for the spillways from both the Kinlochlevan and Lochaber Hydro plants owned by the Aluminium works to extract secondary hydro from this fast flowing stream. To help here is a link to one design - https://www.wattandsea.com/en/products/cruising-hydrogenerators I agree that moving water won''t answer the problem of intermittent generation alone but the more of it we can harness the less fluctuation in power we might face in the wind/solar future that is being thrust upon the country. Currently we let millions of joules of potential energy flow through our towns and cities untapped and that to me is a waste, especially when it could be harness exactly where it is needed most. Let''s hope voices like yours and mine can make the body politic see sense before the lights do go out.

On demand coming soon: edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

I missed the webinar - is it available to stream?

Renewables forecast to overtake fossil fuels in 2020

Thank you Keiron. There is a problem with moving water in the form of tidally connected movement. At the high and low tide times, water movement all but ceases as it changes direction. This produces four two-hour periods of slack water every 24 hours. This applies to tidal lagoon proposals, such as Swansea, as well as tidal streams. The tidal stream potential is also limited, the Pentland Firth is almost unique in its velocity. Suitable site are not easily found. There is also the matter of the amount of power to be generated. The standard power station is 1000MW, 1GW. This unit would require 100 Albi units. Power from rivers usually involves considerable drops in level in the local geography, which in the Thames valley, we do not have. The Durance gives France a lot of power, but we do not have the Alps!!! The boat generator I not come across, but does it not depend upon the boat moving, and this in turn upon petrol, or back to the variable wind? Historically, our standards of living have increased with the energy which has become available to us, and this in turn upon the density of that energy. Human muscle gave way to animal muscle, and to wind and water. The great step was to steam and the Industrial Revolution. The latest most dense energy to be harnessed is of course nuclear fission. Roll on fusion, but very difficult. But the body politic seems unlikely to see sense until the lights really do go out! Richard Phillips

Renewables forecast to overtake fossil fuels in 2020

@Richard - :-) no need to be repentant someone needs to make sure the correct information is put out there rather than the very effective media spin that is put on this subject. You are correct, we could cover the country in solar panels, thousands of megawatts of installed capacity but we''d still get zero watts at night. Same with wind turbines when the wind is less than 10mph (or greater than 40mph for that matter). Moving water has power and the sooner we start harnessing all the moving water in and around our island the sooner we have a more reliable, consistent source of power. If Albi in France can harness the Tarn with a water turbine to power 10,000 homes consistently why can''t Reading do the same with the Thames? There''s a 10MW power station on the Tay so why not build more like this? We have huge tidal streams around the coasts that move massive amounts of water at speeds in excess of 6kts. We need to harness these sources of power more. You can buy a hydro generator for a boat that will charge your batteries at 3kts quite happily so why not scale up this technology? You could even use this kind of thing to harness the water flowing over weirs and under bridges. Every kilowatt counts and these are all reliable, consistent kilowatts too.

Renewables forecast to overtake fossil fuels in 2020

Well said Keiron It would seem that no matter how often it is repeated, there are a great number of influential individuals who cannot seem to understand that the TWh means only that electricity was generated, irrespective of demand. It is high time that edie newsroom took a great deal more care in this matter. To publish matter that is misleading is no help to UK plc. Yet again I will draw attention to the fact that the metered wind turbine generation for five consecutive days from 31 May to 5 June last year, was less than 1GW. Unmetered generation had exactly the same profile. This was from an installed capacity of some 20GW. During the 1st and 4th of June, the generation was effectively zero. The whole of this deficiency had to be satisfied by fossil fuel, gas and coal. No matter how many turbines are built, if the wind does not blow, as above, the whole of the deficiency has to met by fossil fuel. Storage capacity does not last beyond about a day, and is limited in volume. 80% nuclear and the rest CCGT. Forget about renewables, they just cost us money, and are largely ineffective in reducing CO2. Unrepentant. Richard Phillips

Renewables forecast to overtake fossil fuels in 2020

In some ways this is a positive thing, we can''t continue to burn a valuable resource (gas and oil) that has so many vital uses in modern life. But on the other hand without a reliable system to store energy or handle fluctuation in the generation ability of renewables there is an ever increasing risk of supply difficulties and the lights going out. Lack of investment in other technologies with better "base load" characteristics, such as hydro and tidal and even run of the river schemes, has left us with a very skewed generation capacity relying on unreliable weather. It is only a matter of time before the power goes out when the wind stops or the sun isn''t shining.

UK revealed as EU champion of fossil fuel subsidies

As long as renewable energy generators, principally wind turbines, continue to be built, fossil fuelled electricity generators will have to be built and subsidised. The reason is clear to the technically aware. ALL renewables supply electricity according to the whims of nature. The balance between their generation and demand is necessarily supplied by fossil fuelled (and nuclear) plants. Fossil fuel working in this fashion has proved inefficient and thus loss-making. But it is essential, and private generators, as they are, will not operate at a loss. Hence, to give the country a reliable supply of power, they must be subsidised. So not only do we subsidise renewable energy, this energy per se makes it essential to subsidise fossil fuel generation. But our political masters are not scientists, or electrical engineers; the only people who have the knowledge to make rational decisions concerning the industry, but who are, manifestly, excluded from any policy discussion. Come back Stanley Baldwin!! Richard Phillips

UK's first national recycling scheme launched for contact lenses

Specifically, what type of plastic is the contact lens?

M&S removes plastic packaging and 'best-before' dates from produce

M&S still have along way to go though, based on my local store. Lidl removed sell by dates on fresh produce some while ago; hopefully this will end the absurd situation I had in a Waitrose last year when they refused to sell me some perfectly good root veg because it had already passed the sell by date, even though it was still on the shelf (and marked down as reduced for quick sale)!

Crunch time for crisp makers as EU waste targets loom

Crisp packets are indeed a challenge since in contrast to plastic/aluminium laminates such as petfood, baby food and drink pouches and toothpaste and cosmetic tubes which contain a foil which can and should be recovered, they contain just enough aluminium to be a nuisance to would-be recyclers. However, Enval which has a profitable and environmentally beneficial solution for the foil-containing laminates is ready to help if the brands and the packaging producers are serious about doing something. Time to put their money where their mouth is.

Crunch time for crisp makers as EU waste targets loom

"By 2030, an average of 50% of Coca-Cola bottles will be made from recycled content." Too little, too late.

UK's first floating tidal stream turbine to be built in Scotland

It was a great disappointment about the Swansea tidal lagoon, but it''s a completely different technology (and scale) to the Orbital Power project that has just completed funding. The Orbital device floats above a tidal stream, that requires little fixed infrastructure (apart from cables and something to anchor it to the right spot), and produces energy comparable in amount to a wind turbine, rather than to a full scale power station. However it''s scalable and there are other sites around the UK coast - and internationally, of course, where this type of solution could be deployed.

Lush to open UK's first plastic-free cosmetics store in Manchester

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

To report a 49MW battery construction, is to state its capability to deliver 49MW, but for how long?. A hour perhaps, one twentieth of a standard power station, for just one hour. Certainly useful frequency support for variable, unreliable renewable energy generation, but for supplying power to customers, meaningless. Power stations capable of generating dispatchable power, the only type built before chaotic renewables, never needed any such support. It is only renewables that have spawned an avalanche of supportive devices, frequency and voltage controllers, phase correction, all very high power, solid state, and prices to match. Previously simply not required. and the customer pays. Un-itemised on the bill, for good reason. Richard Phillips

One week left to register for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

what are the impacts on our environment by using biodegradables and plant based polymers e.g increased CO2 through processing or land use, land use, pesticides, contamination of recycling, water use, communities use of land for food

Defra launches ?5m food redistribution scheme to help businesses slash waste

Let s get this clear: giving surplus food to charities will not deliver SDG 2.1. Nor will it deliver SDG 12.3 to halve food waste which is mostly post retail with some further upstream Let s not institutionalise this thinking or create mechanisms which perpetuate both waste and poverty

Hydrogen bikes and electric 'delivery dogs': The best green innovations of CES 2019

Great!

MPs call for a new Minister for Hunger to tackle food insecurity 'scandal'

Should this not say "nutrient poor but calorie rich"?

Speaker line-up confirmed for edie's single-use plastics business transformation webinar

I have registered for this because of my interest in this topic but it clashes with a meeting.

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

Apologies for my faulty memory: sea level rise running at 3mm per year at present, not 8! 30cm a century. Not exactly a cause for panic!

Global warming of oceans equivalent to an atomic bomb per second

If we produced the same energy output for each of the last 150 years, then the energy that could be taken up by the oceans would be 150 times what we produce each year now. But these researchers are claiming it is 1,000 times as much as our annual energy output. Two possibilities: we used to produce much more energy than we do now. No so, especially if you go back 150 years!!! Secondly, this figure is wrong and it is amazing that it can be published in a respectable journal. What is not surprising is that it was published in the Guardian, a newspaper that has lost all sense of critical examination of any scare about global warming! Sea level rise is running at 8mm a year and that rate is barely increasing year on year. And half of that may be due to the land level sinking - not easy to stop!

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

IAIN WHYTE ESQ / related to Fred Whyte had consultancy in London? in any case here here! PHIPIP ASPINALL we and our clients have the same problem

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

Maybe BEIS should be fitted with a smart meter to increase its intelligence. Or perhaps they just have as their ludicrous decision has been reversed. Can we have any confidence that BEIS is fit for purpose

Solar households to be paid for excess power after Government U-turn

More confusion and another Energy Minister who talks about the future rather than sorting out the present problem. Exported electricity was supposed to be measured by the smart meters that everyone is paying for through energy taxation on the bills but they don''t work!

Two-thirds of Britain's recyclable plastic packaging is not being recycled, finds Co-op

Recycling is crucial, more consumers need to be encouraged to participate. I have taken it seriously for years, I did live in Germany for a while where they do take it seriously, still room for improvement of course but leaps and bounds ahead of the UK. I have always washed my recycling with the washing up since the introduction of recycling bins but living in a block of flats I often see contaminated waste in the recycling bins. The health risks to our environment and all the life it supports should be reason enough to improve our habits regarding plastics and our use and disposal of them. When the plastics industry itself is alarmed enough to explore and invest in improving recycling rates we should take notice and do whatever we can to contribute.

Manchester commits to making all new buildings 'net-zero' by 2028

At last! Come on Central Government. But I hope that this does not provide an excuse for excessive rises in house prices.

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

The data provided leaves this item quite meaningless. To quote only the mega-wattage of an installation is merely to make a statement about the amount power it can supply per second. What is missing is a figure for the length of time for which that power can continue to be provided. Batteries, even big ones, run down and out. Without an indication of the number of hours for which power can be provided, the information is meaningless. Mention is made of the function of the batteries to stabilise frequency. This is a light duty by comparison with the provision of industrial scale power. But this function is entirely beyond any battery installation when considered over the scale of five or more windless days, as occurred at the beginning of June last year. Batteries are a business project promoted on the ignorance of the political world. As ever. Richard Phillips

Energy regulations: Coming to a home near you - The WSP Blog

Question, if I may, regarding the efficiency of Heat Pumps. As they use an electric pump and compressor to extract the heat from whichever medium is being used as the source how efficient are they in real terms? IE how much extra heat can they extract above what is required to operate the pump and compressor in real world conditions (say in London and in Glasgow). Especially Air Sourced when the air temperature is zero degrees or below. How much heat do they extract from such cold air and how much is an effect of the pump and compressor running? I''m not anti Heat Pump, in fact I strongly support development of Water Source Heat Pumps to tap the warm waters on the West Coast, but I don''t think Air and Ground Source are as efficient and cost effective as they are sometimes made out to be.

Why tree planting should be part of your climate change strategy - The Woodland Trust blog

Not just trees but any green leafed plant. Think roof top gardens, think hanging gardens, think vertical gardens. Window boxes, hedges and anywhere that green leafed plants can be grown should be encouraged. Especially in towns and cities where they also have the benefit of helping to clean the air.

Centrica completes 49MW battery facility in Cumbria

Longannet, Didcot anyone? Have to ask how long this facility can provide power for. 49MW sounds impressive but if it only lasts a couple of hours it doesn''t really mean much. If it can provide meaningful supply for days then that is something else. Then of course you have to factor in how long it takes to recharge

President Trump's environmental agenda - the story so far

No comment - words fail me...

Veganuary: Why meat-free meals could be the key to tackling climate challenges

All these new vegan products are great (I am a vegetarian myself) but what are the health and environmental implications? For example, almond milk from a dry region like California might be worse for the environment long-term. And vegan products are processed and it is not clear what they contain. Is anyone keeping an eye on potential rebound effects?

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

@Iain - I checked the performance of my EvoHome TRVs against a digital thermometer (well 2 different ones) and they were all within 0.5C. Not bad considering the TRVs are right next to the very hot radiator. Additionally we have 3 "room" thermostats to allow guests to control the temperature in the guest bedrooms which read the air temperature well away from the rads and these also show the same 0.5C tolerance. Plus with the EvoHome TRVs you can calibrate them to a know room temperature. But you are very correct in saying that we should all check how accurate our thermostats actually are. With the hot water I have a 300litre tank, which is 50% bigger than your standard domestic HW tank. The main thermostatic control is located about 1/3rd of the way up and I have a digital thermometer here to give me a read out of the tank temp at this location. This one reads 51C when the thermostat clicks off and the Motorised Valve closes. My second digital thermometer utilises the unused upper immersion element to read the temperature inside the tank. There is no thermostat at this location 2/3rd of the way up so I positioned the thermoprobe inside the tube for the immersion thermostat (with me?) so I get a very accurate temperature reading. This normally reads 56C when the tank is full. The very top of the tank (measured using an IR thermometer on the take off pipes) reads over 60C so covering the legionella problem. Plus we do a manual cycle with the thermostat periodically. With the EvoHome H/W controller you can cut a hole in the tank insulation and strap the sensor to the tank so theoretically can position it anywhere you chose or there is a probe sensor so it you have a spare immersion tube you might find this an option.

New Year Honours 2019: Sustainability champions make Queen's list

Ummm...... IPCC special report ref COP 24 states that we need to cut fossil fuel use by 50% by 2030 and zero by 2050. The contributions of these individuals to such sustainability is ............?

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

I have yet to get my new heating system fully up and running (doing a barn conversion) but have most of the components in place. One thing I have found is that the digital room thermostats are not well adjusted when supplied. I''ve checked mine against a pair of calibrated mercury-in-glass thermometers and found that they over-read by between 1 and 2.1 degrees. The floor and remote air probes also give different results even when placed next to each other. Clearly the thermistors have a production spread and the thermostats don''t seem to be set up accurately at the factory - although there is a calibration facility in the thermostat. Most people won''t think to check their thermostats. When their display resolves to 20.1 degree that''s what most people assume they are measuring. There is the dilemma now as to whether I leave them over-reading by 2 degrees so that people see them reading 22 when it''s actually 20deg and saving me money! I''m looking forward to seeing how the ''optimum start'' facility works as with UFH the response times are long but you need thermostats which work on a small differential to keep an even temperature. I also have a challenge with a large open plan area having 2 UFH zones under engineered wood flooring with a maximum surface temperature limit of 27 degree (measured using a floor probe) plus a large area under york stone slabs - think 24 hour response times! and an area of clay pamments which probably respond faster than the wooden area. So 1, 2,3 or 4 thermostats? and there is also a woodburner going in as an alternative to TV. I''m convinced that comfort is more important than temperature. I''ve not cracked the hot water yet. The insulated cylinder has its own thermostat (fairly crude) but at the bottom of the tank and It would be more useful to have one half way up as well. One thing on water temp, most of the time 50 to 55 deg will be OK, 60 degree for a weekly Legionella cycle but if you have additional demand e.g. guests you can push the temperature up to 70deg for a couple of hours when there is ''peak shower demand'' and effectively gain a larger tank.

Bill Gates: Nuclear power 'ideal' for tackling climate challenges

"...Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) has predicted that renewable energy sources will account for around three-quarters of the expected $10trn global investment into power generating technologies between now and 2040..." Ignoring burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactors could be the downfall of much investment in renewable energy sources. 2030 will see the FOAK, operational, GE-Hitachi BWRX-30 and a few years later, it s the NOAK at an overnight cost of $2,000/kW. This overnight rate could choke off investment in renewables and might even signal the collapse of renewable technologies including the multitude of proposed storage technologies in any nation with a sound grid network. A single BWRX-300, will have an overnight cost of 468 million in the UK and will deliver 142 million MWh of dividend-paying, 24/7 units of electricity. Whitelee Windfarm, the UK''s biggest version of the most cost-effective renewable technology onshore wind cost 600 million and will deliver 32 million MWh of dividend-paying, intermittent units of electricity. Investing 28% more for just 22.5% of the earnings would clearly be insane. But the killer punch is the declaration from the USA s NRC that the Emergency Planning Zone [EPZ] for SMRs can be at the boundary fence of the tiny site. This Forbes article makes it clear that SMRs can be sited close to population centres. Search for: "How Far Do You Have To Run After A Small Modular Nuclear Meltdown" So this one BWRX-300 could supply all of the electricity domestic; commercial; industrial to a UK city the size of Leicester and also decarbonise much of the heating. That''s twice the bang for our bucks. It would be politically unconscionable, to a cash-strapped electorate, for any government to continue with a policy that ignores developments in advanced nuclear reactors and continues with a policy of directing investment towards renewables.

Bill Gates: Nuclear power 'ideal' for tackling climate challenges

"...Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) has predicted that renewable energy sources will account for around three-quarters of the expected $10trn global investment into power generating technologies between now and 2040..." Ignoring burgeoning developments in advanced nuclear reactors could be the downfall of much investment in renewable energy sources. 2030 will see the FOAK, operational, GE-Hitachi BWRX-30 and a few years later, it s the NOAK at an overnight cost of $2,000/kW. This overnight rate could choke off investment in renewables and might even signal the collapse of renewable technologies including the multitude of proposed storage technologies in any nation with a sound grid network. A single BWRX-300, will have an overnight cost of 468 million in the UK and will deliver 142 million MWh of dividend-paying, 24/7 units of electricity. Whitelee Windfarm, the UK''s biggest version of the most cost-effective renewable technology onshore wind cost 600 million and will deliver 32 million MWh of dividend-paying, intermittent units of electricity. Investing 28% more for just 22.5% of the earnings would clearly be insane. But the killer punch is the declaration from the USA s NRC that the Emergency Planning Zone [EPZ] for SMRs can be at the boundary fence of the tiny site. This Forbes article makes it clear that SMRs can be sited close to population centres. Search for: "How Far Do You Have To Run After A Small Modular Nuclear Meltdown" So this one BWRX-300 could supply all of the electricity domestic; commercial; industrial to a UK city the size of Leicester and also decarbonise much of the heating. That''s twice the bang for our bucks. It would be politically unconscionable, to a cash-strapped electorate, for any government to continue with a policy that ignores developments in advanced nuclear reactors and continues with a policy of directing investment towards renewables.

Central Heating - is the future smart? - Sustainabilty Musings from the Cesspool of Life

Well, dear reader, the new year has started and the evidence is in. So what''s the result of my smart heating system? I estimate based on the purchase of heating oil from 2017 vs our purchases in 2018 that we bought at least 500 litres less oil year on year. That is about a 17% reduction in energy used. I''m pretty happy with that figure and I think we can hit 20% with a bit of fine tuning of the system settings. I''m not sure if I will add the H/W to the EvoHome system as I have optimised that quite well just by using 2 digital "fridge" thermometers to accurate monitor the water temperature and adjust the hot water tank thermostat accordingly (it was set at a shockingly high 70C initially!!). If you are thinking about upgrading your central heating control system I would definitely recommend the EvoHome

Scotland receives green light for large-scale water source heat pump project

This really is excellent news and a welcome change from the Scottish Government''s rabid focus on wind. Given the west coast of Scotland is bathed in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream / North Atlantic Drift we should be building on this on a much larger scale to harness all the gazillions joules of heat energy on our doorsteps.

In numbers: The growing consumer demand for sustainable packaging

Plastic depositing scheme by Iceland is highly commendable but only half of the solution to the global scurge of plastic pollution. The other - positive - solution is to provide an alternative packaging method for - firstly - liquid products. This we are now doing with cunsumate success in Australia, Hong Kong and , shortly, in Ireland and the US, not to mention under consideration by other UK retailers. Our company, with factories in SE Asia are producing renewable, sustainable bottles made of stainless steel and the innovative dispensers (kiosks) for providing still or sparkling fresh water. For any retailing companies interested in joining us in this environmental revolution, please contact me, Prof. Dr. Alexander Schoen: dr.schoen2@btinternet.com flag as inappropriate

Iceland collects more than 300,000 plastic bottles in reverse vending trial

Plastic depositing scheme by Iceland is highly commendable but only half of the solution to the global scurge of plastic pollution. The other - positive - solution is to provide an alternative packaging method for - firstly - liquid products. This we are now doing with cunsumate success in Australia, Hong Kong and , shortly, in Ireland and the US, not to mention under consideration by other UK retailers. Our company, with factories in SE Asia are producing renewable, sustainable bottles made of stainless steel and the innovative dispensers (kiosks) for providing still or sparkling fresh water. For any retailing companies interested in joining us in this environmental revolution, please contact me, Prof. Dr. Alexander Schoen: dr.schoen2@btinternet.com

In 2019, businesses will need to embrace sustainability, or risk being left behind - The HP Blog

It may be a small thing, but I would take more notice of HP''s views if they made it easier (and cheaper) to recycle inkjet cartridges. More positively, I''m intrigued by the idea that 3D printing may be beneficial. Historically we have been told that globalised production - while adding to transport emissions shipping goods around - was often better overall, owing to the ability to invest in more efficient manufacturing processes. It may well be that 3D printing has turned this on its head, though if the raw materials for printing are themselves shipped from (say) China, I suspect that any benefits may be marginal. But I would love it if HP could share some properly computed carbon footprinting data on this subject.

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

Just so Hugh! The electricity generated by renewables HAS to be accepted into the grid in preference to fossil or nuclear generation. By law. This takes no regard of demand, indeed renewables CANNOT respond to demand. Note that biomass generates less electricity per kg of CO2 generated, than pure coal. But money talks, as long as subsidies are available, renewables will be with us. Richard Phillips

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

No mention in this article of the huge increase of imports from the Netherlands, France and Belgium needed to keep the UK system balanced

UK power stations' electricity output lowest since 1994

VOTE: Which sustainability issue will have its 'plastics moment' in 2019?

I think Biodiversity should be on this list. The protection of ecosystems and the interconnected nature of valuing the natural capital contained within them is surely an issue of catacysmically huge proportions.