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Report: Green businesses double performance of fossil fuel peers

Yep!!!! Its all about money, but not the provision of reasonably priced electricity ! Richard Phillips

UK is plugged in, as global car industry speeds away from fossil fuels - The CDP Blog

My current issue with Electric Vehicles (EV) is still range. I''m actually in the market for a new, small, car after a write off so I did look at the EV offerings. Living in the Highlands means you need the ability to drive a fair distance. The nearest "big" city is Inverness, 65 miles away and Glasgow is 107 miles. Even with rapid chargers (to 80%) these are still borderline getting there on a single charge with most small EVs. In winter in a Leaf I''d have to recharge at Tyndrum to reach Glasgow and that assumes a FULL charge not a rapid to 80%. I don''t want or need a big car but the only EVs with a suitable range (at present) are big SUV types. This includes most of the Plug in Hybrid EVs too. Until the kind of cars that many people want to drive are PHEV or EV, with at least a 200 mile REAL WORLD range and not theoretical (I mean in winter with the lights, heating, radio, windscreen wipers etc on) then they will remain an unviable option for those living in rural areas. With time and development I do see a day when {virtually} all vehicles on our roads will be zero or ultra low emission but don''t kill off the Internal Combustion Engine just yet. It''s flexibility, range and ultra rapid (ie a 55litre tank and 350-500mile range in 5 mins) refuelling plus its ability to supply on board electrical power and heat mean it still has a future.

Mine shaft energy storage and post-consumer packaging: the best green innovations of the week

Consuming power to Lift the weight during "lower" cost energy periods is based on the concept that there are hours in the day of lower energy usage. They are still there. However, the distribution use of charges costs at winter rates will be spread out further in every 24 hours, from April 18. With UOS costs reaching 60% of delivered energy cost, the renewable energy supply has to be on the load side of the lifting energy demand

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

The London Assembly report is quite wrong as the burning of such waste generates green electricity and heat for a capital city with an enormous appetite for these essentials - without using fossil fuels. Burning plastic waste takes that material out of circulation completely and eliminates any chance of it ending up in the ocean many recycling cycles later. Burning food waste is better than anaerobic digestion because you get the energy out of that waste without expensive AD plant and without the leftover digestate which still has to be disposed of after AD and there is limited potential for it to be used as fertiliser and it still requires transport to the site where the fertiliser is required, burning it provides useful electricity and heat and there is limited emission if the EfW plant exhaust is properly cleaned.

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

The London Assembly report is quite wrong as the burning of such waste generates green electricity and heat for a capital city with an enormous appetite for these essentials - without using fossil fuels. Burning plastic waste takes that material out of circulation completely and eliminates any chance of it ending up in the ocean many recycling cycles later. Burning food waste is better than anaerobic digestion because you get the energy out of that waste without expensive AD plant and without the leftover digestate which still has to be disposed of after AD and there is limited potential for it to be used as fertiliser and it still requires transport to the site where the fertiliser is required, burning it provides useful electricity and heat and there is limited emission if the EfW plant exhaust is properly cleaned.

Mine shaft energy storage and post-consumer packaging: the best green innovations of the week

Sometimes you read content wondering how much of it is - and I hate using this phrase - ''fake news''. I got that feeling reading about astronauts eating their own faeces (if it isn''t, it should be!) and ''gravitricty'' with no information about the mechanics of production.

Sustainable Business Covered podcast: Thames tours with Tideway

Ever looked out at the stern of the river ''buses''. The level of diesel smoke pollution is enormous when they accelerate between stops. Seems a bit strange to write a report on pollution from one of the most polluting forms of river transport.

London Assembly: Energy-from-Waste a 'last resort' option

Leonie Cooper needs to get a grip on reality. There is no alternative to W2E. Recycling only works if somebody somewhere has a commercially viable system to process recyclables. China doesn''t want our plastic. Mixed waste paper is 10 per tonne. How can the councils or private sector make that work? Without W2E, we will drown in un-recyclable plastics in the years to come.

BBC vows to 'lead the way' with single-use plastics ban by 2020

I am so encouraged by this action. I hope the government is also encouraged. Meanwhile, we are storing our single use plastics until we can find a way for them to be recycled: meat trays, fruit trays, margarine and yoghurt containers,, plastic wrapping, broken plant pots, bubble wrap, etc.

Top investors call on global food brands to make plant-based shift

Hi Haydn, The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that livestock systems account for 14.5% of total global GHG emissions from human activities. Thanks, George

Top investors call on global food brands to make plant-based shift

Could you please inform me of what source you are quoting Ghg livestock at 14:5% of total emissions Thank you Haydn evans

London, Barcelona or Singapore: Which will be the best smart city in the world?

It is good to see London amongst the leaders and making a big contribution.

Achieving a sustainable future is Mission Possible - Cranfield University Blog

Mission Possible is ambitious but achievable. If we all put a bit of effort, I am sure we can make it possible. Mariale, Thanks for sharing and inspiring. Best, Alberto

8 global sustainability trends to watch out for in 2018 - The Schneider Electric blog

This is highly valuable and informative blog for people who love sustainability and sustainability professionals.

8 global sustainability trends to watch out for in 2018 - The Schneider Electric blog

This is highly valuable and informative blog for people who love sustainability and sustainability professionals.

Plastics now a 'competitive issue' for business, CIWM chief warns

I wonder when all the noise quietens down, the papers move to the next emergency, whether anything will have changed ? I remember talking to a major coffee retailer last year, six months after the coffee cups scandal exploded. He admitted that beyond a few meetings to show the outside world they are attempting to do something, his business model had not changed at all. Nor had his chain lost one pound of sales. Indeed they continue to sell coffee in non recyclable cups. If we want things to stay as they are, things have to change or words to that effect from The Leopard.

Auto giants launch EV-sharing platform in China

Time for a car-sharing app in UK? Electric cars ideal, but not a prerequisite to get the system going.

How business can play a part in the new Northern Forest - The Creative Concern blog

The need for timber trees and professional management in new planting projects By Chris Yarrow Nowadays woodland management and silviculture often feature as after-thoughts in the case of new tree planting in Britain. Is this because the initiators are too engrossed in raising funds, getting consents and persuading politicians? Is it because, in these days of multi-purpose forestry, nobody is prepared to agree a suitable mix of benefits? Or is that no-one can guarantee funding to care for and administer the resulting woodlands? For the past four decades public debate about trees and woodlands has been dominated by environmental aspects, and commercial afforestation, especially of productive conifers, has dropped off markedly. It is easy to promote a simple message such as exotics bad; natives good , just as many were swayed by the message Make America great again. The implication of such simplistic slogans on British forestry is that timber production and planting the most appropriate trees for the site are lost in the clamour of thinking that we are saving the environment by simply increasing woodland cover. Work in established plantations has often overturned original long-term objectives by felling trees, irrespective of commercial or aesthetic merit, purely because they are considered to be alien. Under pressure from naturalist and other pressure groups, PAWS Restoration is now official policy. Very little communication with the public currently deals with woodland management, compared with, for example, coverage of tree-planting events. (Hemery, undated). Perhaps the multiplicity of forestry organisations in this country means that the profession and industry fail to come together to speak with one voice, and the well-funded environmental groups are better organised at influencing Government on matters of forest policy. As Roger Richardson argued last year, as a profession we tend to preach to the converted (Richardson, 2017) and we have only ourselves to blame if the public ignores us. Although tending trees for timber goes on for several decades, UK grants for tree-planting have far outweighed support for management, and we are all familiar with neglected plantations direly in need of thinning, pest control, or access for harvesting. It is no surprise, therefore, that over forty percent of English woods are neglected. Production of good timber is the result of long-term skilled application of good silviculture. With a lifetime s experience as a chartered forester I know only too well how under-appreciated are the skills of my profession compared with almost any other. Who among us has not seen inappropriate, or downright amateur prescriptions handed out by untrained advisers or those with another agenda? The recent announcement of the creation of a new Northern Forest will be welcomed by many. It is proposed to plant over a 25-year period 62,000 acres between Liverpool and Hull, incorporating five community forests, at a cost of 500 million, and starting in Bolton this March. Apparently, the project will be overseen by The Woodland Trust and the Community Forest Trust. The Government has pledged 5.7 million, but it is anticipated that most of the funding will come from charities. Among the stated objectives of landscape, conservation and flood control benefits, there is no mention of timber production. With eighty percent of our timber needs met by imports, should we not, post-Brexit, be looking to increase our self-sufficiency in any new large-scale afforestation? I do not argue that timber production is always a profitable venture, but its inclusion of a nurse crop in a multiple-use management regime can assist establishment, as well as offset early costs. This will be especially true in planting up often-inhospitable Pennine sites, and Britain s foresters can claim unparalleled expertise in this field. The increasing demand for biofuel and plastic substitutes is reason alone to include exposure-tolerant conifer nurse species. By doing so a whole raft of benefits would accrue, not least of which would be better-formed broadleaves, if these are the long-term objective. On suitable locations a catch-crop of Christmas trees can offset establishment costs, as well as provide an attraction for visits and associated purchases, activities and the like. At Wilderness Wood we sold some 2,500 trees each Christmas, and our source for a number of years was an area we re-established after the 1987 Great Storm (Yarrow, 2015). I do not posit that our 63-acre venture would be applicable to all conditions, but elements of its management would fit into some areas within easy access to population centres. The source of plants is of considerable concern if we wish to obtain useable timber. The Forestry Commission set up Registered Seed Stands many years ago complemented by the BIHIP in 1991, rebranded as the Future Trees Trust, in order to improve planting stock of trees planted in the UK. Who of us has not had to inspect or manage a stand where the seed source must have been sweepings off a road or a parkland tree? One such 1960 stand in Wilderness Wood had beech so badly forked there was hardly a tree worth retaining, and in the interests of good silviculture, the stand became principally the pine with which it had been planted (Yarrow, op. cit.). Let us hope that, among the laudable aims of genetic diversity and local provenance, tree form is now to be given adequate status. It seems inconceivable that bodies, including Natural Resources Wales under its Acorns Antics programme, are encouraging schoolchildren to collect mast for replanting local forests and woodlands, irrespective of tree quality. (Natural Resources Wales, 2017). Would any farmer let a runt ram loose in his herd of prize ewes just because it was local? No reasonable person can suggest that timber trees of good form are in any way incompatible with all the other benefits that a multiple-use wood can offer, unless they crave impenetrable thickets of overgrown scrub. Sadly, there is no shortage of such woods for them to seek out and enjoy from the edges! Surely it is time that groups such as Woodland Heritage and Future Trees Trust were actively involved in the planning stages of all new planting initiatives of any size. In this way our successors will have worthwhile trees, as well as a protected landscape. Refs. HEMERY, G.(Undated) Reviving a wood culture in the UK In: The State of the UK s Forests, Woods and Trees, Woodland Trust. NATURAL RESOURCES WALES (Newsletter, 28/11/2017) Acorn Antics Achievement RICHARDSON, R. (2017) Future success? Woodland Heritage YARROW, C. (2015) Thirty Years in Wilderness Wood. Troubador The above will be published in this year''s Woodland Heritage magazine. Let me know if you would like an amended version. Chris Yarrow.

Transport becomes nation's biggest polluter as UK emissions drop 5%

Why won''t the government implement a 2p/litre charge on motor fuel? It would raise a huge amount for the NHS etc, and drivers would hardly notice, as this would be well within local variations of fuel prices at the pumps. Also, why do they not subsidise the formation of a national car-share scheme, which could be managed on an Uber style basis? Anyone up for starting such a scheme?

Transport becomes nation's biggest polluter as UK emissions drop 5%

Why won''t the government implement a 2p/litre charge on motor fuel? It would raise a huge amount for the NHS etc, and drivers would hardly notice, as this would be well within local variations of fuel prices at the pumps. Also, why do they not subsidise the formation of a national car-share scheme, which could be managed on an Uber style basis? Anyone up for starting such a scheme?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

I also wish to know who is going to validate this material ? There is only currently one standard that certifies biodegradable packaging and this is the EN13432 on compostability. Will Polymateria request certification under this standard ? If not, what validation are they suggesting ?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

I wish to know also whether this is an oxo degradable plastic. The EU announced its intention to restrict the use of such materials in their communication of January 16th 2018. If this is not plastic with an additive, then what is it ?

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

Tesla uses a lot of plastics and material mixes that effectively prevent recycling. Not a great comparison. If Dunne means he''s putting his money where his mouth is then the billions of investment in UK recycling industry and new technologies would be good to hear about. Walk the walk.

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

@Dan - one big issue with glass is weight. I''m all for aluminium though as it will help secure the local jobs at the aluminium foundry here in Fort William. Plastic is perfect for many packaging uses because it is inert, clear, flexible and lightweight. There is nothing intrinsically wrong with plastic just the way we all abuse it by throwing it away recklessly

Ex-BT chief Niall Dunne on a mission to create the 'Tesla of plastics'

lets just get back to glass packaging and aluminium and forget plastic



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