Arsenal's Emirates Stadium inks deal to source 100% renewable energy

Arsenal Football Club's 60,000-seater stadium in North London has become the first Premier League stadium to source 100% of its electricity needs from renewables, after the club extended its supplier deal with Octopus Energy.

(L to R) Octopus Energy founder Greg Jackson, Arsenal Manager Arsene Wenger and Chief Executive Officer Ivan Gazidis

(L to R) Octopus Energy founder Greg Jackson, Arsenal Manager Arsene Wenger and Chief Executive Officer Ivan Gazidis

Announced late last week, the deal will see Octopus Energy power Arsenal’s Emirates Stadium using renewable energy generated across an array of solar farms operated by the energy start-up firm.

The move follows a year-long trial at Arsenal which boosted the club’s use of renewable energy. Arsenal’s chief executive Ivan Gazidis noted that it was “important” that football clubs take steps in this area.

Octopus Energy’s chief executive Greg Jackson added: “The technology to create electricity from renewable sources is now so efficient, that we can offer 'green' energy to our customers which is cheaper than many 'non-green' tariffs. Being green doesn't have to cost the earth.

"We have been delighted to work with such an awesome club as Arsenal, and are looking forward to continuing our partnership into the future."

While the deal with Octopus Energy makes Arsenal the first Premier League club to switch to 100% renewables to power a stadium, the club has previously implemented various sustainability initiatives at the ground in Ashburton Grove.

The Emirates Stadium is fitted with water recycling systems, while all surplus or waste food is sent to an anaerobic digestion (AD) plant, which is turned into energy that is then fed back to the club. The use of voltage optimisation equipment and LED lights have also reduced power use by up to 20%.

Gunning for green

The club’s former midfielder Mathieu Flamini is also making waves in the low-carbon market, after revealing an eight-year secret plan that has seen him set up a market-leading biofuel technology firm in a sector worth up to £20bn.

The French footballer set up GF Biochemicals in 2008, and it is reportedly a leader in developing levulinic acid (LA) – a green alternative to oil that can be used in biofuels, cosmetics, plastics and food preservatives.

Elsewhere in the Premier League, newly-promoted Newcastle United is pursuing a “carbon positive” status and recently installed a combined heat and power (CHP) system at its own St James Park Stadium, to reduce the football club’s emissions by more than 390 tonnes every year.

On the back of Manchester City Football Club partnering with an energy storage company earlier this year, edie took a closer look at how the club incorporated sustainable business practices into its multi-billion pound transformation, in line with its rise up the Premier League table.

Matt Mace


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