Homebase pledges zero-waste-to-landfill by 2021

Home improvement retailer Homebase has pledged to achieve zero-waste-to-landfill status by 2021, after partnering with recycling and waste management firm Reconomy.

Homebase's contract with Reconomy will run for three years 

Homebase's contract with Reconomy will run for three years 

The pledge covers all waste from Homebase’s 168 stores and three distribution centres across the UK and Ireland.

Homebase has said it will work with Reconomy to develop a sustainability strategy including measures to achieve “net-zero waste”.

As a first step, the retailer will provide training and support to its 7,500 stores and distribution centre team staff to ensure that they follow new recycling processes. Training will emphasise the environmental benefits and cost reductions likely to be reaped by diverting waste from landfill.

Most interpretations of “zero-waste-to-landfill, and certifications around the term, involve diverting a minimum of 99% of generated waste. This can be achieved by reuse, recycling, composting or generating energy-from-waste.

"We're committed to reducing our impact on the environment and to helping our customers make sustainable choices in their own homes and gardens,” Homebase’s director of property, procurement and productivity Sarah Taitt said.

By working together with Reconomy, we'll have a greater impact on the communities in which we operate, as well as our overall environmental contribution."

Homebase does not currently publicly disclose data around its waste footprint but states that it is “committed to reducing [its] impact on the environment in all areas of [its] business”, with an overarching ethos of raising awareness and changing behaviours among staff, suppliers, customers and communities.

Zero-waste transition

With consumer awareness around humanity’s over-consumption of resources and growing production of waste mounting – and with landfill in the UK now costing more than £80 per tonne in tax – Homebase is one of many businesses investing in zero-waste-to-landfill schemes.

A select few have already achieved zero-waste-to-landfill certification, including pub chain and brewer Marston’s; automotive giant Jaguar Land Rover and property developer Landsec.

Business action in this space is broadly expected to escalate in 2020, amid ongoing consumer activism and legislation changes. In the UK, for example, many key consultations around the Resources and Waste Strategy – the first major policy shake-up in this field for more than a decade – are closing in the coming weeks and months.


Hear from Reconomy during edie's Business Leadership Inspiration Sessions

Registration is now open for the Business Leadership Inspiration Sessions: an afternoon of three live, interactive webinar presentations and discussions all dedicated to helping businesses collaborate, innovate and actuate to eliminate single-use plastics.

This exclusive online event, sponsored by Nestlé, PHS Group and Reconomy, is being hosted by the edie editorial team on the afternoon of Thursday 16 January 2020. Registrants will gain access to three live and interactive webinar sessions: a Q&A debate (1pm–1.45pm); a selection of best-practice case studies (2pm–3pm); and a 45-minute masterclass (3.15pm–4pm).

For further information and to register for free, click here. 


Sarah George



Tags

| Reuse | waste management | Resource Management | Retail

Topics

Waste & resource management | CSR & ethics


Click a keyword to see more stories on that topic, view related news, or find more related items.

Comments

You need to be logged in to make a comment. Don't have an account? Set one up right now in seconds!


© Faversham House Ltd 2020. edie news articles may be copied or forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution is permitted without prior written consent.