Scotlands first 'recycling superstore' opens in the Highlands

Zero Waste Scotland has launched its first recycling superstore in the Scottsih Highlands

The store also features a Repair Club, with staff demonstrating sewing skills and furniture repairs to the general public

The store also features a Repair Club, with staff demonstrating sewing skills and furniture repairs to the general public

The Blythswood Care’s store - opened on June 5 - is the first of Zero Waste Scotland’s re-use ‘hubs’, which it hopes will popularise the concept of a circular economy.

The shop in Dingwall will sell a variety of second-hand items ranging from furniture and kitchen appliances, to carpets, toys and clothes.

The store also features a Repair Club, with staff demonstrating sewing skills and furniture repairs to customers.

Leading the way

Zero Waste Scotland’s head of circular economy, Louise McGregor, called the scheme “a terrific example of a third sector organisation trying out a unique and innovative model by teaming up with other organisations from across the country to source a really wide range of high-quality goods from all over Scotland.”

She said that more superstores will be rolled out across Scotland this year, aiming to make the re-use sector a big player in Scottish retail.

McGregor added: “As well as preventing items going to landfill needlessly, encouraging consumers to choose re-use helps boost the Scottish economy and create local jobs - all part of reducing our reliance on an unsustainable economic model of take, make and dispose.”

A 10% increase in re-use in the Highlands would generate almost £50,000 and generate carbon savings equivalent to taking more than 300 cars off the road.

Embracing a circular economy throughout the UK could create 200,000 jobs, according to WRAP.

Carrer bags

In related news, Asda has awarded £156,000 funding to Scottish social enterprises from cash it raised during the first six months of the Scottish carrier bag tax.

All told, the retailer generated more than £300,000 from the 5p charge on single-use carrier bags.

Organisations that will benefit from the £10,000-£50,000 loans include a gymnastics club, a local radio station and a conservation group.

The funds were distributed by Social Investment Scotland (SIS), the country's leading funder to voluntary groups.

Asda senior director for Scotland Kevin McBride said: "At Asda, we want the carrier bag charge to have long-term social, as well as environmental, benefits.

"Our partnership with SIS is about using the scale and expertise of Asda to make a real difference to the third sector and help nurture more resilient communities. We're proud to be involved."

--- Read edie's rundown of shocking carrier bag sustainability statistics --- 

Brad Allen


Tags

Circular economy | Retail | Scotland | WRAP

Topics

Waste & resource management
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