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A power purchase agreement (PPA), is a contract between an energy generator and an energy buyer or ‘end-user'. PPAs can provide a fixed price for energy generated over the duration of the contract, removing exposure to energy price volatility and allowing for accurate and predictable cost planning.

One of BT’s flagship sustainability commitments is to help its customers cut carbon emissions by three times their own end-to-end emissions by 2020

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The long run: business has a vested interest in solving the UK energy crisis and contributing to a low-carbon future

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