Selfridges targets 45% of all sales to be from circular products and services by 2030

Selfridges has announced a new target to ensure that 45% of its transactions across stores and online come from circular products, practices and services by 2030. It will also ensure that it only stocks products that meet environmental and ethical criteria.


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Selfridges targets 45% of all sales to be from circular products and services by 2030

Selfridges launched its Project Earth sustainability strategy two years ago

Selfridges launched its Project Earth sustainability strategy two years ago. It was headlined by a net-zero commitment for 2050 that has since been moved forward to 2040, after signing up to Amazon’s Climate Pledge.

On materials, it has committed to sourcing all high-impact materials used throughout the business from suppliers with third-party sustainability certifications by 2025. Building an existing target to replace palm oil with alternatives certified as sustainable in own-brand grocery products, achieved in early 2019, the new aim will cover materials such as leather and synthetic textiles used in fashion and homewares.

The company has since added to the material pillars part of the strategy, pledging to ensure that 45% of its transactions across stores and online come from circular products, practices and services by 2030. The company will also draw up stringent criteria for what it considers environmental and ethical and will strive to only stock those products.

Selfridges’ managing director Andrew Keith said: “In creating our store of tomorrow we must commit to a fundamental shift in the way that we do business and use the Selfridges platform for change. Our vision is to reinvent retail and create a more sustainable future, and Project Earth and our new targets underpin this.

“We recognise that we need to challenge ourselves to accelerate change and our ambitious circular and materials targets do just that. We don’t have all the answers, but we are committed to finding solutions, through a continued imaginative approach to retail innovation. The scale of our ambitions cannot be underestimated but we are inspired by what lies ahead and how we bring this to life for our customers.”

The ‘business models’ pillar of Selfridges’ new plans will see the retailer host repair, resale and rental services for fashion, in partnership with a swathe of the third-party brands that it stocks, including Levi Strauss and Prada.

Selfridges has deployed a range of closed-loop products and services.

After hosting a pop-up with clothing resale platform Depop at its flagship London location in 2019, Selfridges has since launched ‘Resellfridges’ – its first own-brand resale model. Shoppers are able to buy and sell vintage and modern garments and accessories from Selfridges’ own-brand labels in-store and online.

This includes a service enabling wedding parties to rent outfits and accessories or to buy second-hand. At stores, wedding parties are able to browse a curated edit of pre-owned items including designer dresses, suits and vintage accessories. There will be the option to buy or rent these items. Additionally available for rent will be a selection of contemporary pieces designed using upcycled materials.

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