High-pressure water-jetting: the maths behind the motion, the physics behind the flush


Uploaded by
28/09/2012 16:1

Professor Charlie Fairfield, Professor of Civil Engineering, Edinburgh Napier University Topics covered: The jetting resistance of sewers, how cavitation cleanses, how it causes damage, and applications to next-generation sewer systems. Target audience WASCs, jetting contractors, Local Authorities Key facts imparted Safe jetting limits, optimal jet positioning, and which materials can take the pressure.

Video: High-pressure water-jetting: the maths behind the motion, the physics behind the flush
Views: 38

Related Video

Doing it in the cold

What will be discussed As our global climate warms up, the climate for action has been getting colder. For many of us, climate change has been forced way down the agenda. Regulatory uncertainty and risk, especially over Feed In Tariff, and meagre returns has caused a flight of capital. This session will discuss ways of doing and funding low carbon heat and power, in a cold financial climate. We will look at: -Benefits of renewable heat, mainly communal heating with heat pumps and biomass boilers, with case studies -Barriers and pitfalls and how to address these -Funding structures to give the property owner optimal benefits given their varying resources and ability or willingness to take on risk -Best use of RHI, CESP and CERT -Solar PV - life after 2011 FIT Review: structuring solar PV programmes with meagre Feed In Tariff levels: Who Should Attend Local Authorities and Housing Associations Private Landlords Anyone with an interest in low carbon residential heat and power. What delegates will learn Delegates will learn from the experience of iPower and its delivery partners: - about a distinctive approach to delivering low carbon heat and power -what benefits have been achieved from renewable heat installations, and barriers and risks involved -how a response can be made to the solar PV opportunity, despite low FIT levels -about options for structuring and financing low carbon energy to suit differing levels of resource and ability to take on risk.

Energy Mapping - Maximizing Environmental & Revenue Opportunities using Geographic Analysis

The Climate Change Act commits the UK Government to reduce carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. Incentives to help reach this target include Feed-in Tariffs, the Renewable Heat Incentive, Green Deal and CRC Energy Efficiency Scheme. These create opportunities to make savings through greater energy efficiency and generate income streams through the use of zero and low carbon technologies such as solar and CHP. To maximize energy savings and income generation, a robust evidence base is needed to plan strategic options and to communicate potential to stakeholders. Geographic analysis and visualisation can play a pivotal role in creating this and disseminating it to different audiences. This presentation will show how the strategic planning of energy use and generation is inherently spatial in nature and cannot be done without the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics covered will include: - Creating a property level evidence base to support decisions making - Delivering the evidence base to stakeholders - Promoting opportunities to customers/citizens Delegates will learn how tools inherent within GIS can be used with methodologies and approaches from experts in low carbon and energy efficiency to derive the information required to make evidence based decisions which justify expenditure and maximize the return in terms of revenue and carbon reduction. Examples will be drawn on work undertaken by industry experts, Esri UK and Local Authorities including Nottingham City Council. This presentation should be attended by those with an interest in the strategic planning and mapping of energy demand and future generation.

Save Money Water

ABB: a Totex approach in the water industry

Water industry product specialist, Alan Hunt, discusses how information management drives efficiency gains under Totex in this informative interview.

Proprietary and vegetative combination employed for supermarket's surface water run off

Leicester City Council has worked collaboratively with Asda, ISG and ACO Water Management to achieve a first in sustainable urban drainage within a supermarket development. The solution is integrated drainage that combines proprietary and vegetative systems to achieve effective surface water management, whilst introducing a level of biodiversity never attained before on a retail development. Working to strict planning guidelines that required two swale inlets to be incorporated onto the site, the solution moved away from a the more common permeable paving to achieve a cost effective, near to surface solution that required minimal ground works. As a result, stormwater is successfully managed on or near the surface, in an area that would have typically been highly impermeable.

You need to be logged in to make a comment. Don't have an account? Set one up right now in seconds!