On-Line Low level Trace Metal analysis for process and enivironmental control


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28/09/2012 15:4

The presentation will introduce the anodic stripping voltammetry technology that is effectively used to detect trace metals, on-line at low concentrations. We will look at the benefits of online realtime monitoring and discuss the value of having meaningful data representing the water quality trends. Case studies will be presented where the instruments are used in control wastewater treatment and discharge applications and also for raw water in drinking water and other industrial processes. These will include examples across Europe, Asia and the Americas. The attendees should include Operators, Environmental Managers, Regulators, Consultants and Treatment equipment suppliers. Delegates will learn the principals of the technology and gain an understanding of how the world is waking up to the value of on-line, real time trace metal monitoring.

Video: On-Line Low level Trace Metal analysis for process and enivironmental control
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