Disney launches new Micky Mouse-shaped solar farm

A 22-acre solar facility arranged in the shape of Micky Mouse's head will provide 5MW of renewable energy at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Florida.

An aerial shot of Disney World's new solar farm, which has been designed in the shape of Mickey Mouse's head. Photo: Nearmap

An aerial shot of Disney World's new solar farm, which has been designed in the shape of Mickey Mouse's head. Photo: Nearmap

A total of 48,000 on-site solar panels will produce the power - which is equivalent of 1,000 residential solar rooftops systems - for the entertainment and recreation facility along with its partners such as the Four Seasons Resort and Hotel Plaza Boulevard hoteliers.

Walt Disney World Resort environmental integration director Angie Renner said: “As a company that cares about the environment, we continually take steps of varying sizes to benefit the environment and protect the planet. This new solar facility will help us in our efforts to conserve natural resources.”

The solar farm was designed by Duke Energy as part of an on-going renewable energy development project which will see the electric power holding company add up to 500MW of additional power to Florida by 2024.

Shades of Green

Duke Energy Florida state president Alex Glenn said: “We’re committed to providing our customers with greater access to renewable energy, and the Walt Disney World Solar Facility is one example of how we’re doing that.

"We appreciate this unique opportunity to collaborate with Reedy Creek Improvement District and Walt Disney World Resort to expand the use of solar energy generation in Florida.”

According to Disney's latest corporate citizenship report, commitment to sustainability has been a central tenet of the company's mission to conduct its business in an ethical manner. The environmental impact of its operations have been reduced through innovations such as the trains at Disneyland Resort which run on biodiesel made with recycled cooking oil from the resort’s restaurants and hotels.

In 2015, Disney reduced net emissions by 34% from 2012 levels, with an aim to reach 50% by 2020. The company diverts 49% of waste from landfill and incineration, with a 60% goal set for 2020.

On-site solutions at edie Live

On-site sustainability solutions are one of the key topics to be discussed in depth at the edie Live 2016 exhibition at the NEC Birmingham in May. 

From the UK’s largest on-site solar installations to small-scale, single-site solutions, hear from those sustainability professionals that have already done the work and are making it happen for their business.

Register to attend edie Live 2016 here.

George Ogleby


solar | Onsite Solutions


Energy efficiency & low-carbon | Renewables
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