Oil giant to build world’s largest solar project in Philippines

The oil giant, BP, has announced that it is to build the world’s largest solar project in the Philippines, at a cost of US$48 million, which will benefit over 400,000 people in 150 villages.


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The scheme is being financed by the Spanish Government as part of a co-operative agreement between the two countries, a BP spokesperson told edie, and will begin in September with the first phase involving 35 local authorities, known as agrarian reform communities (ARCs), in the Mindanao region in the south east of the country. The programme will include the installation of 428 solar systems, providing lighting to 5,500 homes, 25 irrigation systems, 97 potable water and distribution systems, and power to 35 health clinics.

The second phase of the project will commence in two years time, and will provide a further 44 ARCs in the area with 9,500 home lighting systems, 44 irrigation systems, and power to 79 schools. Both phases will also involve training for the recipient communities.

“This project reminds us that in the world’s most isolated areas, solar is often the most cost effective way to supply basic essential needs such as lighting, water pumping, irrigation, and refrigeration for vaccines and medications,” said Harry Shimp, President of BP Solar. “We have been honoured to work with outstanding representatives from the Spanish and Philippine governments to ensure that each village receives the help it most needs to get on the road to real economic development.”

BP has also recently completed a $30 million rural electrification project in the Philippines, and a similar $30 million project in Indonesia.

© Faversham House Ltd 2022 edie news articles may be copied or forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution is permitted without prior written consent.

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