Leading infrastructure firms make carbon-cutting pledge

Five more firms have committed to slashing their emissions by joining the Infrastructure Carbon Review (ICR).

ICR say its recommendations have the potential to save the UK £1.46 billion a year by 2050

ICR say its recommendations have the potential to save the UK £1.46 billion a year by 2050

Thames Tideway Tunnel, Lafarge Tarmac, Temple Group, Kier Infrastructure and Barhale Trant Utilities are the latest companies to sign up to the joint government and industry initiative which aims to reduce carbon from the construction and operation of the UK's infrastructure.

ICR says its recommendations have the potential to reduce up to 24 million tonnes of carbon and save the UK £1.46 billion a year by 2050. It now has a core group of some 30 signatories, including National Grid, Mott Macdonald and Heathrow Airport.

Speaking at the ICR One Year On conference, where the five new signatories were announced, Business, Innovation and Skills Minister Nick Boles said: "All the evidence shows that cutting carbon is good for business. That's why companies responsible for some of the country's largest infrastructure projects have made this important commitment.

"Companies like HS2 Ltd, National Grid, Skanska and their supply chains are leading the way in efforts to reduce carbon, saving valuable resources as well as reducing costs. I'd like to extend this challenge to infrastructure companies and organisations across the UK so they can claim their share of the economic rewards of reducing carbon."


Thames Tideway Tunnel's environment manager Suzanne Burgoyne added: "We are proud to pledge to lower our carbon emissions as part of our project to tackle pollution of the tidal River Thames. Through the Infrastructure Carbon Review we are demonstrating our commitment to low carbon and the protection of the wider environment."

One of the successes of the scheme so far is Connect Plus, developed by Balfour Beatty, Skanska, Atkins and Egis, which speeds up the road repair process using ultra-rapid cure concrete. This has cut the time needed for M25 land and carriageway closures from 1,500 hours to just 300 per annum, together with a carbon saving of 500 tonnes.

In August, manufacturers called for the creation of an independent authority to address Britain's long-term strategic infrastructure requirements and encourage investment in energy and roads.

Brad Allen


| Infrastructure


Energy efficiency & low-carbon
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