Regent's Place 'exemplar' for sustainable development

Regents Place, a 13-acre mixed-use site, located north of the Euston Road, has undergone a transformation to establish the building as an exemplar of sustainable development.

Regent's Place: 24.6% of construction materials came from recycled sources

Regent's Place: 24.6% of construction materials came from recycled sources

The estate's sustainability features include a PV installation, producing more than 15,000kW/h each year and a water management system, which harvests around 2.4 million litres of rainwater annually. This is recycled for toilet and urinal flushing as well as irrigation purposes.

In addition, a 1750m2 (22,000 sq ft) green roof has been installed, which aims to encourage biodiversity at the site.

During the planning phase, British Land, who carried out the project, incorporated resource efficiency measures. This has seen 24.6% of construction materials coming from recycled sources. All of the timber is certified sustainable, and over 85% of the development waste was either reused or recycled.

The estate, as a whole, is designed to be up to 32% more carbon efficient than current standards. Contributing factors include enhanced building air tightness, high performance glazing, motion and daylight sensors, electronic energy monitoring and high efficiency centralized heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.

British Land's sustainable developments executive, Sarah Cary, said: "Ensuring our developments are equipped with leading edge technologies, optimally integrated within the building and operated according to the most advanced methods in order to ensure the highest possible energy reduction, plays a key role in our commitment to improve energy performance of each building in our portfolio".

In total, landlord-influenced energy use has been cut across all like-for-like buildings, saving occupiers £527,000 and reducing carbon emissions by 4,200 tonnes.

Meanwhile, Central St Giles, a former Ministry of Defence building near Tottenham Court Road and New Oxford Street, London, received the same treatment and is now home to companies such as WPP, Google and NBCUniversal.

Leigh Stringer


| sustainable development | construction_waste


Energy efficiency & low-carbon
Click a keyword to see more stories on that topic, view related news, or find more related items.


You need to be logged in to make a comment. Don't have an account? Set one up right now in seconds!

© Faversham House Group Ltd 2013. edie news articles may be copied or forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution is permitted without prior written consent.