New partnership tackles building efficiency compliance

Businesses looking to comply with forthcoming EU building efficiency laws can now take advantage of a new transatlantic partnership, as UK building science centre BRE has teamed up with Green Generation Solutions - a US-based firms specialising in retrofitting energy efficiency.


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The partners aim help businesses comply with EU legislation, taking effect within three years, which will make it illegal to rent out a business premise with an energy performance certificate (EPC) rating below E. 

BRE will carry out independent energy audits on buildings to identify quick wins and long-term improvements that can be implemented and GreenGen will then provide cost-and-return data to clients and manage the delivery of work.

CEO of GreenGen Brad Dockser said: “We have a tried and tested method for assessing and implementing energy efficiency solutions that provides real economic benefit and improved profitability to our clients and their assets.

“We know the built assets in the UK and Europe will be challenging because of the age profile, but we have BRE’s expertise and years of data in this field to ensure we continue to achieve positive financial results.”

Rooms for improvement

Solutions will include improvements to the building envelope, mechanical systems, controls and lighting, with an additional focus on policy, procedures and occupant behaviour.

Head of BRE’s Building Futures Group Simon Cross said: ‘We have a critical need in the UK to drive down operating costs and reduce risk for aging property portfolios so owners and managers of built assets can improve building performance and their energy performance certificate ratings.

Earlier this week the UK government announced a similar policy for domestic landlords, requiring them to upgrade their properties to at least grade E before letting them out.

Just yesterday, the University of Bath unveiled one innovative solution to the problem of inefficient homes, with a prototype straw house, which could reduce heating bills by 90% over a brick-built home.

edie staff

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