Solar gives Glastonbury bright future

The installation of a new solar panel roof at Glastonbury Festival's Worthy Farm will generate almost 45,000 kWh of electricity per year.

Michael Eavis celebrates completion of his new solar roof at Worthy Farm, site of the Glastonbury Festival

Michael Eavis celebrates completion of his new solar roof at Worthy Farm, site of the Glastonbury Festival

Festival organiser Michael Eavis has added another 200 solar photovoltaic (PV) panels to the 1,100 panels previously installed. Mr Eavis currently owns one of the largest private solar roofs in the UK.

The new panels cover an area larger than a tennis court and will save more than 25 tonnes of carbon dioxide, while earning money under the Government's feed-in tariff.

The installation of the panels will allow Mr Eavis to generate enough electricity to milk some of his 400 cows and keep their milk cool.

Mr Eavis said: "Generating our electricity using solar PV panels is fantastic and couldn't get any better. It produces no smell or dirt, there's no wages to pay for producing it and we get all this wonderful free electricity."

Hannah Spungin of renewable energy specialist, Solarsense, who completed the installation, said: "We are delighted to be able to help Michael Eavis cut the farm's carbon footprint even further.

"We hope the latest installation will encourage other farmers and businesses to think about the benefits of using renewable energy to reduce their own electricity bills and carbon emissions".

Leigh Stringer


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| feed in tariff | solar | solar_roof

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Energy efficiency & low-carbon
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