Young women twice as likely to help environment as men

Women are far more likely to pledge their support for the environment than their male counterparts, according to the Environment Agency.

Hollyoaks' Connie Powney brushes up on her green credentials for World Environment Day, by turning the tap off when she cleans her teeth while water-waster sister Cassie let's it flow

Hollyoaks' Connie Powney brushes up on her green credentials for World Environment Day, by turning the tap off when she cleans her teeth while water-waster sister Cassie let's it flow

The agency has analysed the results of June's World Environment Day campaign, when it sought pledges from the public, asking them to make small changes to their daily lives which would help the environment.

Women, it seems, are out-pledging men across the board with the most noticeable gap in the age range of 25-34, where they are making more than twice the number of pledges.

It is only as men get older, it seems, that the state of the environment becomes a greater concern, with pledges made by over 55s showing far more balance between the sexes.

Nick Rijke, head of stakeholder relations for the Environment Agency said: "Women are clearly taking the lead in putting the environment first in their day to day lives.

"It seems that we men have got some catching up to do, or could it be that women simply care more about the environment around us than men?"

This year over 20,000 people made pledges to help conserve water, reduce waste or cut emissions while some 200 firms made business pledges to run greener organisations.

Those who cared about the environment were invited to sign up to 'easy wins' like reusing plastic shopping bags or turning off the tap while brushing their teeth.

TV twins Connie and Cassie Powney, the Burton sisters from soap Hollyoaks were among those who showed their commitment by pledging to take a shower rather than a bath.

If pledgers stick to their promises for the whole year they will collectively save a massive 384 million litres of water, cut carbon dioxide emissions by 25 million kilograms, and avoiding the need for over 2 million plastic bags which laid end to end would stretch further than from Land's End to John O'Groats.

Those who missed out in June but are still keen to make pledges can do so online at the Environment Agency's website. By Sam Bond


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