Tesco adds first zero-emission electric lorry to delivery fleet

Tesco has launched its first zero-emission electric lorry to make deliveries across Great London, with plans in place to add more to its service over the coming months.


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Tesco adds first zero-emission electric lorry to delivery fleet

The lorry is expected to replace around 30,000 miles of diesel truck transport, saving around 23 tonnes of CO2e annually

Tesco’s first zero-emission electric lorry has been provided by Renault Trucks and is currently delivering to more than 400 stores in Greater London. The lorry has a range of up to 130 miles with the same carry capacity as the conventional diesel trucks it is replacing.

The lorry is expected to replace around 30,000 miles of diesel truck transport, saving around 23 tonnes of CO2e annually. Tesco has also introduced an EV charge point at its Dagenham distribution centre to provide clean energy charging.

The Renault D Wide E-Tech truck is also able to operate at multiple temperature levels, allowing it to move different stock that requires different temperature needs.

Tesco has also confirmed it is working with Volta Trucks on a prototype full-electric lorry for transportation around urban areas. Tesco will add more zero-emission HGVs to its fleet over the coming months.

Tesco’s chief executive Jason Tarry, said: “We all want to see improved air quality and less pollution in our towns and cities, and electric vehicles will play a crucial role in achieving this. The Tesco distribution network is one of the largest in the UK and provides us with a great opportunity to roll out new technologies like this industry-leading E Tech electric truck from Renault Trucks.

“Together with our switch to electric home delivery vans and rolling out electric vehicle charging points for our customers, we’re really excited about the improvements we’re making across our business, and our transition to electric vehicles.”

EVs and solar PV

Heavy goods vehicles account for around 16% of the UK’s domestic transport emissions and Tesco is introducing an array of solutions to tackle this source of emissions to help deliver its own net-zero ambition.

Earlier in the year, the retailer confirmed it was introducing new HGV refrigeration units that will be powered by solar panels, in a move that reduces diesel use and builds towards the retailer’s net-zero commitment for 2035.

Tesco has confirmed that its first 13.6-metre refrigerated trailer has been fitted with 12 lightweight solar panels and lithium batteries to power the unit with clean energy. The trailer, based at Tesco’s Peterborough Distribution Centre, is already delivering stock to stores across the East of England, with three more units planned for the site later this year.

Tesco is also working with other businesses through the Government’s Electric Vehicle Fleet Accelerator (EVFA) to increase the uptake of electric vehicle (EV) fleets in the UK.

Tesco has a net-zero target for operational emissions by 2035 in the UK. UK operations have already been provided with interim decarbonisation targets, set against a 2015 baseline: delivering a 35% cut by 2020; 60% by 2025 and 85% by 2030.

Last year, the retail giant committed to reaching net-zero emissions across the entire value chain, including all supply chains and the customer use of sold products. A 2050 deadline has been set for tackling these emissions, which make up more than 90% of Tesco’s total emissions footprint.

© Faversham House Ltd 2022 edie news articles may be copied or forwarded for individual use only. No other reproduction or distribution is permitted without prior written consent.

Comments (1)

  1. Richard Phillips says:

    Fine, zero emission from the lorry.
    But the electricity has to be generated, and our largest generation is from natural gas. Emissions.
    The whole story has to be told.
    Electricity generation is not the sole source of emissions, there is the battery. The manufacture of a large number of batteries is China, not a pleasant process.
    We really should consider whole story in these matters.
    Even with nuclear power, the fuel story is not one of total purity, but in full, probably better than most.
    It is not at all simple, but there it is!
    Sorry!
    Richard Phillips

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